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JustDucky

"mild Gluten Allergy" - What Does This Mean?

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Hello All! New here. I have some questions...I was just diagnosed via blood test with "mild gluten allergy."

I approached my dr and asked for the testing because I had a terrible scabby outbreak on the trunk of my body, and in talking to a coworker, she said she had a friend who had celiac with skin like mine. I was surprised (because I'm overweight), but after doing some research, figured that a gluten allergy could be causing the outbreak, as well as the joint pain and digestion issues I'd been having since going off of a very low calorie diet (protein drink diet) - which must have acted as an elimination diet, because I had major problems, gained a large amount of weight back after going back to "real" food.

So what does "mild" mean? My hubby thinks that I can still go to the Chinese restaurant and have soy sauce, and small amounts of gluten...but I think I will need to go gluten-free completely. So which one is correct?

But what is completely? Do I have to get rid of ALL wheat products in my kitchen? I'm vegetarian, almost vegan, and I'm mourning the loss of my Boca and Garden burgers, meatless sausage, and seitan :(. I realize that those, and my vital wheat gluten to make seitan, will have to go. What about bisquick and white flour that hubby and daughter use? Those too?

Does a "mild" gluten allergy progress to full celiac (like pre-diabetes can progress?)?

Thanks for any help you can give me. I'm looking forward to a mellow tummy, less joint pain, and clear skin!

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First, "allergy" is a bit of a misnomer, but alot of people use it because the preferred term, "intolerance," doesn't always communicate the seriousness of the condition. If you have a positive antibody blood test, you have Celiac Disease--there is no "mild" about it. If this is the case, all gluten needs to be eliminated from your diet. It's very overwhelming at first but very much worth it in the end. Most of us that are a few years out from diagnosis would never cheat--it's just not worth it no matter how good that Oreo looks!

Second, you need to call your health care provider who made the diagnosis and ask these same questions. If you don't get helpful answers (or if you aren't directed to someone who can give you helpful answers), I would seriously consider switching providers.

I have a non-gluten-free hubby, and we have a mixed kitchen. Thankfully, I was diagnosed before we got married, so he knows all about cross contamination. This is going to be your biggest issue unless the whole family goes gluten-free. As for the vegan diet, get plugged in to your local gluten-free community--usually just a google search away. Typically, you will find one or more Celiacs who are also vegetarian. They will be your greatest resource for what is available in your area.

Good luck.

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Being a 'little bit celiac' is like being a little bit pregnant. Yes it will progress if you continue to eat gluten. You need to be strict with the diet to make sure you are stopping the antibodies. As mentioned celiac is not an allergy it is an autoimmune disease and to stop the attack on your system you need to be strict. With skin lesions it is a good idea to drop iodine in your supplements and salt for a bit. Iodine will keep the antibodies active in your skin. After the lesions have been healed for a bit you can safely add the iodine back in.

Your in a good place to learn how to be safe with your food and in your home. Ask any questions you need to and I hope you are feeling better soon.

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I would ask for a copy of your test results and post them here for deciphering. You could have a mild IgE allergy to gluten and that's what they are referring to. Or you could have IgA or IgG reactions that would lead you to trying out a gluten-free diet to see how your body reacts. Or, you could have positives to some of the more specific celiac tests, and then need to decide if you want to continue eating gluten for accurate further testing or to start your recovery as quickly as possible by going gluten free.

By the sounds of your symptoms, you need to truly eliminate gluten 100%. The term mild doesn't indicate that you should have a little gluten. It means the response in your bloodwork is not severely abnormal yet, but is likely to become more so if you intentionally continue eating even small amounts of gluten. Many intolerant people get plenty sick from kissing gluten-eating spouses or cutting boards that were used for gluten months ago. To know if gluten is the culprit you should make every effort to eliminate, at least for a while, depending on the tests.

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I think there are plenty of people that are overweight and celiac/gluten intolerant. Or at least I hope there is cos I am :P

I am the only gluten-free person in my house. I ditched the flour because it was just impossible to clean up thoroughly enough that I didn't get sick. Anything powdered like that went in the bin.

I agree that 100% gluten-free is the only way...and you may find once you get onto the gluten-free diet that tiny amounts of what you used to eat a lot of will cause a reaction.

Before going gluten free I used to eat a lot of stuff with soy sauce in. Now I can't tolerate even a drop without feeling horrible for days.

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