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Hi, can anyone tell me what deamidated gliadin, Abs IgA and IgG measure. I understand what ttg measures but I can't seem to figure this one out. Does it tell me if I'm getting gluten in my diet still (after several months of gluten-free)? is this an old test? Not all doctors seem to run it with the celiac panel. thank you!

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Hi, can anyone tell me what deamidated gliadin, Abs IgA and IgG measure. I understand what ttg measures but I can't seem to figure this one out. Does it tell me if I'm getting gluten in my diet still (after several months of gluten-free)? is this an old test? Not all doctors seem to run it with the celiac panel. thank you!

DGP is a new test. It has replaced the Anti-gliadin tests by many doc and labs because it is more specific to Celiac. This is from the Mayo clinic site:

Testing for IgA and IgG antibodies to unmodified gliadin proteins is no longer recommended because of the low sensitivity and specificity of these tests for celiac disease; however, recent studies have identified specific B-cell epitopes on the gliadin molecule that, when deamidated by the enzyme tTG, have increased sensitivity and specificity for celiac disease. The tests for deamidated gliadin antibodies, IgA and IgG, replace the older gliadin antibody tests, which have been discontinued at Mayo Clinic. The sensitivity and specificity of DGP Antibodies Evaluation, IgG and IgA for untreated, biopsy-proven celiac disease were comparable to test tTG Antibodies, IgA and IgG in a study conducted at Mayo Clinic.

tTG deaminates gliadin (changes it into a toxic substance), so the DGP measures your body's response to the deaminated gliadin. It is usually the first antibody to appear in the early detection of Celiac disease, and the first one to resolve on a gluten free diet (while the tTg may remain positive longer). So yes, it can be useful in monitoring your compliance to a gluten free diet.

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DGP is a new test. It has replaced the Anti-gliadin tests by many doc and labs because it is more specific to Celiac. This is from the Mayo clinic site:

Testing for IgA and IgG antibodies to unmodified gliadin proteins is no longer recommended because of the low sensitivity and specificity of these tests for celiac disease; however, recent studies have identified specific B-cell epitopes on the gliadin molecule that, when deamidated by the enzyme tTG, have increased sensitivity and specificity for celiac disease. The tests for deamidated gliadin antibodies, IgA and IgG, replace the older gliadin antibody tests, which have been discontinued at Mayo Clinic. The sensitivity and specificity of DGP Antibodies Evaluation, IgG and IgA for untreated, biopsy-proven celiac disease were comparable to test tTG Antibodies, IgA and IgG in a study conducted at Mayo Clinic.

tTG deaminates gliadin (changes it into a toxic substance), so the DGP measures your body's response to the deaminated gliadin. It is usually the first antibody to appear in the early detection of Celiac disease, and the first one to resolve on a gluten free diet (while the tTg may remain positive longer). So yes, it can be useful in monitoring your compliance to a gluten free diet.

thanks! my numbers were still high after 4 months gluten-free so i guess i am still getting gluten somehow....

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thanks! my numbers were still high after 4 months gluten-free so i guess i am still getting gluten somehow....

Can you tell us what you typically eat? We might be able to help you figure out where you are still getting gluten. Also do you eat out frequently? That can be a problem for us as can baking with wheat flours for others or having others bake with flour in our homes. Gluten can be sneaky and I hope we are able to help you figure out where it is sneaking in.

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Can you tell us what you typically eat? We might be able to help you figure out where you are still getting gluten. Also do you eat out frequently? That can be a problem for us as can baking with wheat flours for others or having others bake with flour in our homes. Gluten can be sneaky and I hope we are able to help you figure out where it is sneaking in.

I have eaten out 3 times since diagnosis with only one favorabe result (PF changs). Was baking some with wheat flours (for my family) but haven't done that for months. I take care of my 2-year old twins and they eat gluten (bread, goldfish snacks, soups, etc). Dinners are always gluten free. I realize the risk of cross contamination with cooking for my girls. I wear gloves and try to be really careful. I guess when I was diagnosed i didn't want to deprive my children and thought it was possible to cook for them (not bake) things that have gluten and still be ok. Plus i really don't want the extra cost of doing gluten free breakfast, lunch and snacks for them.

I ate rice, potatoes, quinoa, condiments (all checked to see if g -free),fruits, vegetables, soy milk, chex, popcorn, rice cakes, gluten free breads, meat (not processed). I know any processed food is a risk. Is it time to eat only certified gluten free food? i really want to keep my life simple with having to take care of my family and cook for them.

any help is greatly appreciated. I contacted my dietician but she can't seem to help.

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I would not be baking with regular flour. It can become airborn for quite awhile and can then settle down onto an otherwise clean counter. You also could be inhaling it and swallowing it. As for the little ones I would say they are cross contaminating you. Even though you take precautions during prep they probably are touching other things around the house. It's inevitable with children that little. There are plenty of things they could eat to keep you safe and they won't be deprived. When I went gluten free almost three years ago, I banned baking with flour. I made all our baked goods gluten free. On the occasion that someone wanted something special they went to the bakery. I made all our meals gluten free. We do have a shared kitchen but there is only a small section that is for gluten the rest is gluten free area. Since my diagnosis my youngest son was diagnosed last year and I currently have my oldest son on a gluten free trial. It makes it really easy for me now. The only gluten now is my husbands bread/bagles and cereal.

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I have eaten out 3 times since diagnosis with only one favorabe result (PF changs). Was baking some with wheat flours (for my family) but haven't done that for months. I take care of my 2-year old twins and they eat gluten (bread, goldfish snacks, soups, etc). Dinners are always gluten free. I realize the risk of cross contamination with cooking for my girls. I wear gloves and try to be really careful. I guess when I was diagnosed i didn't want to deprive my children and thought it was possible to cook for them (not bake) things that have gluten and still be ok. Plus i really don't want the extra cost of doing gluten free breakfast, lunch and snacks for them.

I ate rice, potatoes, quinoa, condiments (all checked to see if g -free),fruits, vegetables, soy milk, chex, popcorn, rice cakes, gluten free breads, meat (not processed). I know any processed food is a risk. Is it time to eat only certified gluten free food? i really want to keep my life simple with having to take care of my family and cook for them.

any help is greatly appreciated. I contacted my dietician but she can't seem to help.

My doctor was very concerned about my kids consuming gluten when they may be prone to celiac disease too. In fact we tested everybody and found out we are all carrying the genes for it!

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Uhmmm, "deprive" the children of what, exactly? They don't need to be eating gluten in the home.

You have two little cross contamination vectors spreading the gluten all over the place. This is making you sick. Time to make the household gluten- free. This may also include pets, especially if they are indoor pets.

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Uhmmm, "deprive" the children of what, exactly? They don't need to be eating gluten in the home.

You have two little cross contamination vectors spreading the gluten all over the place. This is making you sick. Time to make the household gluten- free. This may also include pets, especially if they are indoor pets.

thanks, everyone. I agree! So we are a gluten free house now! the hardest part is finding gluten free snacks for my girls. they eat lots of fruit, etc but on the go it's harder to think what i can pack with me for a snack for them. and things just got really expensive. like bread! but i know it's worth it. thanks for the help!

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Do they like nuts? Nut butters are healthy and filling.

Some rice crackers are very good. Try Blue Diamond (think that's the name) - rice/nut mix. My family loves them.

I do compromise on a few things - breakfast cereal and bread. I do buy oat cereal for my son and husband. It is gluten-free, but not since oats are usually cc'd. Anyway - my point is that it's "regular" cereal but low risk to me.

I buy wheat hot dog/hamburger buns but that's the extent of the bread. I'll try them on Udi's next time and see the reaction. Tried gluten-free "flour" tortillas last night. No thanks, I'll find a good corn substitute. Gross.

I agree, 2 year olds are walking cc machines. I found a lot of wheat was empty calories and we're all better for eliminating them.

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