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sahm-i-am

Chef Needs Help!

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Hi everyone! I have a friend that is a chef for a sorority house at a university and cooks meals for up to 75 girls every weeknight. One of her girls just came back from Christmas break with a Celiac diagnosis. My chef friend (Rachel) is freaking out! Do you have any links, resources for her on how to set up her very large kitchen and how not to cross contaminate? Wow! I couldn't imagine.

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Hi everyone! I have a friend that is a chef for a sorority house at a university and cooks meals for up to 75 girls every weeknight. One of her girls just came back from Christmas break with a Celiac diagnosis. My chef friend (Rachel) is freaking out! Do you have any links, resources for her on how to set up her very large kitchen and how not to cross contaminate? Wow! I couldn't imagine.

I am sure others will be on with ideas but maybe you friend could try starting with something like this.

http://glutenfreerestaurantconsulting.com/#

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From what I understand from someone who runs a very successful restaurant, they have 2 separate areas.

Since most food is naturally gluten free and they don't want to contaminate it, rather than marking a space for the gluten free food, they actually mark the space for the gluten containing foods. Essentially, a particular area of the kitchen is for food foods containing gluten so that the entire kitchen isn't compromised. They have a smaller room they use for this while the rest of the kitchen is considered gluten free. Whenever they need to make pizza dough, they just ensure the door is shut through the process and clean everything throughly. Same with any ingredient that contains gluten, always prep it in the smaller room.

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From what I understand from someone who runs a very successful restaurant, they have 2 separate areas.

Since most food is naturally gluten free and they don't want to contaminate it, rather than marking a space for the gluten free food, they actually mark the space for the gluten containing foods. Essentially, a particular area of the kitchen is for food foods containing gluten so that the entire kitchen isn't compromised. They have a smaller room they use for this while the rest of the kitchen is considered gluten free. Whenever they need to make pizza dough, they just ensure the door is shut through the process and clean everything throughly. Same with any ingredient that contains gluten, always prep it in the smaller room.

This is a very great idea - one to really consider. Thank you! I am going to her kitchen at the sorority house Tuesday to help her.

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From what I understand from someone who runs a very successful restaurant, they have 2 separate areas.

Since most food is naturally gluten free and they don't want to contaminate it, rather than marking a space for the gluten free food, they actually mark the space for the gluten containing foods. Essentially, a particular area of the kitchen is for food foods containing gluten so that the entire kitchen isn't compromised. They have a smaller room they use for this while the rest of the kitchen is considered gluten free. Whenever they need to make pizza dough, they just ensure the door is shut through the process and clean everything throughly. Same with any ingredient that contains gluten, always prep it in the smaller room.

What an excellent solution. Why don't more places come up with ideas like this? Confine the gluten - how simple can it get? :rolleyes:

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