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jemc2

Can "gluten-Lite" Slow Onset?

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My 11 year old has a tTGA that has hovered around 40 for 3 years.

Her doctor performed an endoscopy, which was negative.

He said she could eat whatever she wanted, but confidently predicted that

in 6 months she would have full-blown celiac disease, and then would have to go totally

gluten free

My wife and I tried to go gluten-lite - no gluten at home, bu she can eat pizza, cake, etc

when offered it outside the home (which is distressingly frequent).

2 1/2 years on, her tTGA is about the same, and she has no symptoms.

Our thinking was that if gluten is making her react, the less she has, the longer till

celiac disease develops. Apparently there is no evidence that this works (or doesn't)

Has anybody else tried it?

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My 11 year old has a tTGA that has hovered around 40 for 3 years.

Her doctor performed an endoscopy, which was negative.

He said she could eat whatever she wanted, but confidently predicted that

in 6 months she would have full-blown celiac disease, and then would have to go totally

gluten free

My wife and I tried to go gluten-lite - no gluten at home, bu she can eat pizza, cake, etc

when offered it outside the home (which is distressingly frequent).

2 1/2 years on, her tTGA is about the same, and she has no symptoms.

Our thinking was that if gluten is making her react, the less she has, the longer till

celiac disease develops. Apparently there is no evidence that this works (or doesn't)

Has anybody else tried it?

Well...why did you have her initially tested? She was not symptomatic?

Many of have been diagnosed with IBS for many, many years. And often times, there may be a "trigger" that will kick in full symptoms instantly, such as mono, pregnancy, stress, flu or surgery.

Many here have found Celiac as a secondary diagnosis. Should Celiac have been primary, other disorders COULD have been prevented.

I'm not too sure I have answered you question. You seem to be keeping a close eye on her. :)

And welcome! :D

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Well...why did you have her initially tested? She was not symptomatic?

Many of have been diagnosed with IBS for many, many years. And often times, there may be a "trigger" that will kick in full symptoms instantly, such as mono, pregnancy, stress, flu or surgery.

Many here have found Celiac as a secondary diagnosis. Should Celiac have been primary, other disorders COULD have been prevented.

I'm not too sure I have answered you question. You seem to be keeping a close eye on her. :)

And welcome! :D

She is small for her age (both her parents are small too!) so her pediatrician wanted to run a battery of tests

to check that everything was okay. The only one that came up positive was tTGA.

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She is small for her age (both her parents are small too!) so her pediatrician wanted to run a battery of tests

to check that everything was okay. The only one that came up positive was tTGA.

Do you know if he ran the full panel of celiac tests ot just the tTG? There are many people who are silent celiacs, as Lisa has stated, and have no specific celiac symptoms (or symptoms that they recognize as such) and do not find out about the celiac disease until they develop another autoimmune disease like diabetes or lupus os psoriasis or one of the thyroid diseases. Also, a positive tTG is not totallly specific to celiac disease, whereas the DGP test is, also the EMA. Were either of these tests run?

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