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I have been wanting to post this for sometime but have been dealing with a real health issue and my daughter. She has HS and I think there could be a gluten connection but who knows? There is one thing I DO know. If you put something in your mouth that your body does not like it WILL come out, in some form or other, somewhere!

Anyway, back to food labeling. I noticed on the Chebe mixes that I bought while it has calories and no nutrition it gives NOTHING after you add 2 tablespoons of oil, 1 CUP of cheese and two large eggs? So, I started looking and do you believe that MOST box mixes that are NOT gluten-free gives nutrition labeling after the additions which are part of the make-up, if you ask me. On the other hand, NONE of it is correct, I pulled out my calculator and got tons of variables? :(

It really galls me to think most are duped at the nutrition labeling!

Did you ever look at that that word? Nut-rition? Sure glad I am not allergic to NUTS!

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This was a section in my Nutrition and Wellness consultant class and the information for after you add the ingredients in is not there because not everyone uses the same thing. For example, I might use olive oil, some may use canola oil or grapeseed oil, etc. and they all have different nutrition facts. And for cheese there are so many different varieties that could be used that it is not possible to have one set nutrition label with all those possible variables.

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I run into this sort of thing a lot. Even a specific type of flour can have very different labeling, depending upon the company selling it.

As for nutrition facts of a complete recipe, that's not always easy to do accurately. Perhaps the best they can do is to use the values given by the USDA on their website, but the additional ingredients you add may not be nutritionally the same as what the USDA has listed. For instance, if a recipe called for 1 cup of mozzarella cheese, simply how firmly you pack it will effect the nutrition levels. But even more uncertain is the brand and type you select. Some are low sodium, some low fat, some low moisture, etc. Even if they give the nutrition for a specific type, the brand is still going to influence the values.

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IMO the whole nutrition labeling thing is misleading in the first place. This is food we are talking about, not fats, carbs, and protein. They just lead people into various fad reductionist nutrition traps. Low-fat, low-carb, calorie-counting, zone, etc. I don't read them at all any more. :lol: You have to apply common sense. If it has oil, a cup of cheese, and eggs, it will be rich. Eat a little and have a salad with it!

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I read an article - I think just last month - that said most food items actually contain more than what is listed on the label. I can't remember the exact amount, but I believe it was around 10%. So is something is listed as having 100 calories, it actually has somewhere around 110, and so on. Kind of a pain in the butt, IMO.

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