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handsomejack

Inhalation Of Gluten Contaminants Possible?

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After many visits to Doctors over the past few years one of my doctors has begun to suspect that I have a 'gluten sensitivity' and has recommended a gluten-free diet. So for the past 3 weeks I have not knowingly ingested any gluten what-so-ever. I have been suffering for quite some time, so i don't expect an abrupt turn around in 3 weeks.

But my question is related to my workplace. I currently work in a cafeteria where i stand in front of a deep fryer all day long, cooking foods packed with gluten. Is it possible that the fumes I am inhaling may be causing me harm? This may be a dumb question, but I've seen very little if any progress in the past 3 weeks, and would like to rule out whatever I can, as i have been very true to the diet.

Just for the record, my symptoms include, Extreme fatigue (with no relief). brain fog. inability to concentrate. Knee and foot pain. irritable bowels.

all blood work thus far has been ok. My thyroid checks out good. Sleep studys show that i am a sound sleeper.

Thanks for any help you can provide!

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I don't think you're going to receive information on any medical resources regarding the inhaling of gluten molecules, but you might get some anecdotal information from people with experience on this forum. I know someone who has been diagnosed with celiac, and he used to work in a bakery. He claims to be unable to inhale any gluten now, or he becomes extremely ill. He has to wear a mask when he goes grocery shopping or passes a bakery. In his case, I would venture to guess that his body has identified wheat as an enemy and now reacts to it as though it is an actual allergen. Something similar happened to me (and others have recounted similar stories) in that I can no longer touch wheat...or I break out in a rash all over my forearms, and the itching from elbows to fingertips is unbearable. Because I have Dermatitis Herpetiformis, I know that this reaction is NOT DH--rather, it appears to be an allergic response to wheat, so I assume that my body has determined that wheat is an enemy. Perhaps you have both a sensitivity (or celiac) and an allergy to wheat. When you're working, do you experience any allergy symptoms, such as running nose or eyes, coughing, rash, itching, etc.? If you don't already, you should wear gloves when handling wheat products.

Regarding the pain in your knees and feet, you may be experiencing a Manganese (NOT magnesium) deficiency, which is a common deficiency in this country. Try to find a chelated form of Manganese--if you're deficient, you should feel better within days. A deficiency in Manganese can cause problems with connective tissues, rendering your ligaments and tendons floppy so that they don't properly support muscles and bones. Pain is the result. Also, you might feel a looseness when you walk (it can feel as though the bones of your feet are standing on sacks of gelatin). Other nutritional deficiencies, though, can also cause pain in joints. (Deficiencies in Vitamin D, zinc, and B Vitamins come to mind.)

If you have celiac, everyone responds to the diet differently. For me, the bloating, gas, and sick feeling went away immediately. It took 18 months for the diarrhea to completely subside; however, it improved little by little over that time. My joints stopped hurting within about six months. Perhaps the best test for gluten sensitivity and celiac is going on a gluten-free diet for a minimum of three months (though longer is better) and then reintroducing gluten. If you feel brain fog, headachy, dizzy, sick, joints hurt, etc., then you have your answer. Your body's immune system strengthens after you've removed an inflammatory substance from your diet, and it launches a full-out attack when that substance is reintroduced.

In the interim, just be extremely careful to remove ALL gluten from your diet, because even the smallest amount can keep you from feeling better. Usually, a diet of natural foods is best--no processed foods whatsoever. I'm sure others will pop in and give you advice, though--good luck to you!

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After many visits to Doctors over the past few years one of my doctors has begun to suspect that I have a 'gluten sensitivity' and has recommended a gluten-free diet. So for the past 3 weeks I have not knowingly ingested any gluten what-so-ever. I have been suffering for quite some time, so i don't expect an abrupt turn around in 3 weeks.

But my question is related to my workplace. I currently work in a cafeteria where i stand in front of a deep fryer all day long, cooking foods packed with gluten. Is it possible that the fumes I am inhaling may be causing me harm? This may be a dumb question, but I've seen very little if any progress in the past 3 weeks, and would like to rule out whatever I can, as i have been very true to the diet.

Just for the record, my symptoms include, Extreme fatigue (with no relief). brain fog. inability to concentrate. Knee and foot pain. irritable bowels.

all blood work thus far has been ok. My thyroid checks out good. Sleep studys show that i am a sound sleeper.

Thanks for any help you can provide!

My blood recently tested positive for celiac and I am pending biopsy confirmation on Friday. I met with my naturopath to discuss diet options, and I mentioned that I was concerned about working at a bakery where I'd just been hired. She said that there is a reaction spectrum that ranges from No Gluten Problems - Sensitivity Eating Gluten - Gluten Allergy/Gluten Intolerance - Anaphylactic Shock. Though I have a gluten allergy, my symptoms are still mild and so I should not worry about working with flour or inhaling flour dust. From what I understand right now, people who are that strick about avoiding gluten are on the sever vomiting or anaphylactic shock end of the reaction spectrum.

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If you are around a lot of loose dust you could be getting some gluten, whether by inhaling or inadvertently by touching your mouth. HOWEVER, for many people three weeks gluten free isn't enough time to see an enormous improvement.

richard

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