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Becksabec82

Sometimes I Really Hate Doctors

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I was diagnosed with a gluten-intolerance several years ago. The tests were inconclusive, but my doctor was pretty darn sure of it. I had previously been diagnosed with IBS-D, and I responded to a gluten-free diet so he kind of just went with it.

After I had my son last year, my doctor had said some people can tolerate gluten after pregnancy, so he said I could slowly add a little in and see how I dealt with. I was able to successfully move to a non-gluten free diet.

Well....

A couple months later, I started getting sick a lot and I'm to the point where I get infections every 3-4 weeks (mostly upper respiratory stuff), my anemia has returned, IBS-D has come back as has my rosacea (both were in remission for several years). I've also developed a problem with joint pain, headaches, fatigue. My doctor had said that it was tonsilitis, and so I had a tonsilectomy three months ago. I'm still sick every month, and I have chronic throat pain. I've been on painkillers for probably about 6 months. And I just feel so warn down.

Might be time to revisit the gluten-free diet.

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better idea, get tested officially again. You have a child now, Celiac is genetic. Then try the diet again.

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Welcome!

I agree with getting tested again full celiac panel plus nutrient testing - then regardless of what the blood says - remove ALL gluten (unless you think you may have an endoscopy to confirm diagnosis).

The return of your symptoms plus a few more sounds very much like the progressively worsening symptoms of Celiac Disease and will likely continue to get worse.

Let us know if you have more questions :)

As Shadow said - a diagnosis may become very important to your child/other future children.

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I was diagnosed with a gluten-intolerance several years ago. The tests were inconclusive, but my doctor was pretty darn sure of it. I had previously been diagnosed with IBS-D, and I responded to a gluten-free diet so he kind of just went with it.

After I had my son last year, my doctor had said some people can tolerate gluten after pregnancy, so he said I could slowly add a little in and see how I dealt with. I was able to successfully move to a non-gluten free diet.

Well....

A couple months later, I started getting sick a lot and I'm to the point where I get infections every 3-4 weeks (mostly upper respiratory stuff), my anemia has returned, IBS-D has come back as has my rosacea (both were in remission for several years). I've also developed a problem with joint pain, headaches, fatigue. My doctor had said that it was tonsilitis, and so I had a tonsilectomy three months ago. I'm still sick every month, and I have chronic throat pain. I've been on painkillers for probably about 6 months. And I just feel so warn down.

Might be time to revisit the gluten-free diet.

Really seems like you're reacting to gluten; especially since you indicate you were doing so well when you initially removed it. I agree with you that you should probably return to gluten free.

Often times with autoimmune, medical community seems to be at the mercy of how the disease presents itself. As a medical professional myself, I'm not disparaging the profession at all. It just simply seems that every person's symptoms vary greatly, so it's difficult to coral autoimmune into a defined "box". Coupled with hormonal fluctuations (ie- having a baby) - autoimmune can be volatile.

Personally, I spent years +++++ trying to figure out what was "wrong" with me. Took my own research & elimination diet. Identified gluten as a trigger but mostly wheat allergy. I am much more reactive to wheat (especially gmo wheat) than anything else; (ie - sinus migraine, congestion, headaches, skin lesions, inflammation, bloating - you name it:) ALL gone when I don't eat wheat/gluten. Removing wheat also helped my thyroid medicine be better absorbed & used by the body. No doctor (or even a few nutritionists) ever suggested a gluten free diet for thyroid. I pursued it myself after all my "researching" :)

On a side note, my Dad has an intestinal issue that was mostly asymptomatic for 60 + years; a few years ago had to have piece of intestine removed when it was found to be lesioned & destroyed. Doctors were shocked. Doctors place him in the "crohn's" category - though he's still asymptomatic but must be on meds/steroids etc. to keep intestine from inflammation and multiple lesions. He responds to gluten/wheat free but has a hard time maintaining it:) Additionally, my sister, was just diagnosed with Behcet's disease (doctor says it's like a "sister" disease to crohn's) - she had a baby ten months ago & the symptoms started after giving birth (those hormones!). Her lesions were oral, facial & swollen tongue. She is following wheat free/gluten free now and has been successful in no further outbreaks. She is too young for constant steroids and no meds are compatible really with childbearing so she is going the diet route (doctor thinks best route given her age, symptoms & my success with it). So the genetic component is important for you to note (obviously we both inherited genes from my Dad & the allergy/intolerance manifested differently in all three of us, but is definitely wheat related).

Not all issues are diagnosable by specific tests; it is important to note your responses to foods and know yourself. If you are able to follow the gluten free and feel "better", you should give it a try again. Best of luck to you ...

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