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  • Scott Adams

    Is it Common for People with Celiac Disease to Have a Rash?

    Scott Adams
    3 3
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      How common is it for people with celiac disease to have a rash?


    Image: CC BY-SA 2.0--Niels_Olson
    Caption: Image: CC BY-SA 2.0--Niels_Olson

    Celiac.com 10/06/2020 - One question we get often is about celiac disease and rashes. Specifically, is it common for people with celiac disease to have a rash? 

    Skin rash alone is not a specific symptom of celiac disease. However, people with celiac disease can have higher rates of certain skin conditions that can cause rashes. Rashes are also not commonly in the top ten complaints of people with celiac disease



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    However, these seven common skin conditions are associated with celiac disease: Acne; Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis); Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Dry Skin; Eczema; Psoriasis; and Rosacea.

    Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH) is Common Cause of Skin Rash in Celiac Patients

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is a common extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease, marked by itchy papules and vesicles on the elbows, knees, and buttocks. Dermatitis herpetiformis is a common in people with celiac disease, and is one immediate suspect for anyone with celiac disease who develops a rash. 

    About 1 out of 8, or about 12 percent of people with celiac disease will also have Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH). In fact, DH is now regarded as external manifestation of celiac disease in the skin.

    It is also possible for people to have DH and not have celiac disease, but everyone with DH should be screened for celiac disease. The good news is that most people with DH see significant improvement on a gluten-free diet. Moreover, patients with refractory DH see major gut improvement on a gluten-free diet.

    Some patients with celiac disease have complained of hives, but hives are not common in celiac patients. There have also been studies to show that six out of sixty patients (10%) with Non-Celiac Wheat Sensitivity (NCWS) suffered from contact dermatitis and nickel allergy, double the 5% rate seen in the control group.

    DH, Eczema & Psoriasis Often Improve with Gluten-Free Diet

    Other conditions that can cause skin rashes in celiacs (and non-celiacs) include eczema and psoriasis.

    As with DH, a gluten-free diet is becoming a more common treatment for eczema.  People who are gluten intolerant also tend to have more advanced psoriasis. Like eczema, many people with psoriasis improve when patients follow a gluten-free diet. 

    Herpes Zoster or Shingles and Celiac Disease

    People with celiac disease have a slightly higher risk of developing shingles (herpes zoster), which could also be triggered by a COVID-19 infection.

    Again, a rash all by itself is not a sign of celiac disease. However, if you have a rash associated with one of the above conditions AND you have celiac symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, then you might want to consult a doctor about celiac disease.

    Edited by Scott Adams

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    I have celiac disease and with that being an autoimmune disease am subject to all autoimmune conditions. I have a skin condition, autoimmune of course, called Granuloma Annulare. It's skin rash that started on my hands and arms and spread to my back and sides. It's not bothersome except for being unsightly. The Dermatologist prescribed Plaquenil(Hydrochloroquine) for it, which seems to be helping slowly. I have to have field of vision and blood tests every 6 mos. being on that drug.

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     Bob,

    Thought you might be interested in a much less risky treatment for your Granuloma Annulare.

    Niacinamide has been shown to improve the condition.  Niacinamide is a form of Vitamin B3 (Niacin).  

    Here's a study from the National Institute of Health....

    "Response of generalized granuloma annulare to high-dose niacinamide"

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6225398/

    Be aware that Hydroxychloroquine can cause a  Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency....

    "Discovering Thiamine Transporters as Targets of Chloroquine Using a Novel Functional Genomics Strategy"

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3510038/

    Celiacs often suffer from vitamin and mineral deficiencies due to poor absorption.  It's been my experience that doctors have been trained to prescribe pharmaceuticals and are less than knowledgeable about vitamins than what would be beneficial to patients.  

    Niacinamide and Thiamine are water soluble vitamins.  There's no toxicity to thiamine and high doses of Niacinamide have been taken for years without problems.  The group of eight B vitamins all work together.  A B-Complex vitamin in addition to extra Niacinamide and Thiamine might be an alternative to Hydroxychloroquine.

    It's worth a discussion with your your doctor.

    I'm not a doctor.  I'm a microbiologist that suffered severe vitamin and mineral deficiencies from undiagnosed Celiac Disease, all of which went unrecognized by doctors.  

    Hope this helps.

     

     

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    On 10/14/2020 at 1:09 AM, knitty kitty said:

     Bob,

    Thought you might be interested in a much less risky treatment for your Granuloma Annulare.

    Niacinamide has been shown to improve the condition.  Niacinamide is a form of Vitamin B3 (Niacin).  

    Here's a study from the National Institute of Health....

    "Response of generalized granuloma annulare to high-dose niacinamide"

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6225398/

    Be aware that Hydroxychloroquine can cause a  Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency....

    "Discovering Thiamine Transporters as Targets of Chloroquine Using a Novel Functional Genomics Strategy"

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3510038/

    Celiacs often suffer from vitamin and mineral deficiencies due to poor absorption.  It's been my experience that doctors have been trained to prescribe pharmaceuticals and are less than knowledgeable about vitamins than what would be beneficial to patients.  

    Niacinamide and Thiamine are water soluble vitamins.  There's no toxicity to thiamine and high doses of Niacinamide have been taken for years without problems.  The group of eight B vitamins all work together.  A B-Complex vitamin in addition to extra Niacinamide and Thiamine might be an alternative to Hydroxychloroquine.

    It's worth a discussion with your your doctor.

    I'm not a doctor.  I'm a microbiologist that suffered severe vitamin and mineral deficiencies from undiagnosed Celiac Disease, all of which went unrecognized by doctors.  

    Hope this helps.

     

    I've tried Niacin in a B complex pill.  I had negative side effects from niacin for some strange reason. So threw out the B complex and I watch for energy drinks packed with vitamins like niacin. uugg

     

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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