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Neva

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I have not been officially diagnosed but tried gluten free diet a few years ago and found several symptoms releived. I thought of getting tested but was concerned about the cost, and with the time I would have to take to go back on gluten and wade through symptoms again I ould not afford that either. I've been gluten-free about three years now, and was told many times that the changes in me represent the best diagnosis. I thought that was ok, but what about when I become pregnant?

Now I am pregnant. I am in my second trimester...16 wks.

I have been reading some of these posts cause I was wondering what products specifically manstream someone might reccomend for babies...food, lotions etc.

And I get that there is some sort of deal with giving the baby gluten or something at a cirtain time....I am confused...

I don't get when, how, or why we would do this...

And if I have never been officially tested would a doctor listen to me and test my baby?

And another reason I just tried the diet personally I did try asking doctors and started to get the run around and I don't want that for my baby.

Someone in a post mentioned that they would not put a child through gluten-free diet if there is a chance they don't have to...but on the other hand to have them experience physical and or emotional discomfort ...any help????????????

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I myself am not pregnant though would not like to completely exclude that option for myself in the future. So, although I can't help you, I am very interested in the responses you get. According to my docs, even without the biopsy, I am dxd (finally) as celiac disease. Does this mean I should avoid having kids (rather than risk bringing a sick child into the world) as some suggest? Is it best to keep kids gluten-free 1) to maintain a gluten-free house and 2) to avoid their illness? When and how would babies be tested (how long do they have to eat gluten)? Don't mean to steal you thunder, Neva, with my questions, though they are along the same lines as yours. Any help from some celiac disease moms would be great and I wish you some luck, Neva with your pregnancy and baby.

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I have not been officially diagnosed but tried gluten free diet a few years ago and found several symptoms releived.  I thought of getting tested but was concerned about the cost, and with the time I would have to take to go back on gluten and wade through symptoms again I ould not afford that either.  I've been gluten-free about three years now, and was told many times that the changes in me represent the best diagnosis.  I thought that was ok, but what about when I become pregnant?

Now I am pregnant.  I am in my second trimester...16 wks.

I have been reading some of these posts cause I was wondering what products specifically manstream someone might reccomend for babies...food, lotions etc.

And I get that there is some sort of deal with giving the baby gluten or something at a cirtain time....I am confused...

I don't get when, how, or why we would do this...

And if I have never been officially tested would a doctor listen to me and test my baby?And another reason I just tried the diet personally I did try asking doctors and started to get the run around and I don't want that for my baby.

Someone in a post mentioned that they would not put a child through gluten-free diet if there is a chance they don't have to...but on the other hand to have them experience physical and  or emotional discomfort ...any help????????????

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The doctor works for you, so he better listen. :lol: You don't need a dr to agree with you. You get what you want by telling him what to do. You can keep your child gluten free and hope that in a few years there will be a new test that doesn't require gluten in the diet in order to test. Two of my kids are gluten free and don't have celiac disease. I had them tested. I'm gluten free and don't have celiac disease. The diet's not that bad after-all. There are plenty of tasty foods. It's like deciding to be a vegetarian or a vegan. No biggie.

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I myself am not pregnant though would not like to completely exclude that option for myself in the future.  So, although I can't help you, I am very interested in the responses you get.  According to my docs, even without the biopsy, I am dxd (finally) as celiac disease.  Does this mean I should avoid having kids (rather than risk bringing a sick child into the world) as some suggest? Is it best to keep kids gluten-free 1) to maintain a gluten-free house and 2) to avoid their illness?  When and how would babies be tested (how long do they have to eat gluten)?  Don't mean to steal you thunder, Neva, with my questions, though they are along the same lines as yours.  Any help from some celiac disease moms would be great and I wish you some luck, Neva with your pregnancy and baby.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Who the *&%& said that to you???!!! What an a$$. A sick child <_< ? We're all born "terminal". The prognosis is death the minute we're born. :ph34r: If everyone with celiac disease stops breeding, who will eat all the Quinoa? :huh:

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:D Your joke about Quinoa, very funny. I feel the same way as you about a sick child....any reasonably healthy person has a chance of bringing a sick child to term as well and we are all 'terminal'. It wasn't my husband that said it, but someone in his family mentioned it in passing. Very hurtful.

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While you are preg, as you do while not preg, continue eating gluten-free. Breastfeed your baby. You will never have to worry about if this formula or that is gluten-free. Breastfeeding is also the only known variable that will *decrease* the chances of your child having celiac.

It is pretty easy to control a baby/young child's diet. My ds eats gluten-free even though I'm not sure he has celiac. When he gets older (age 5 maybe, when big brain development is passed) we will probably put him on wheat and see what happens then test.

You will need to read ingredients of baby products - a number of them contain wheat germ oil or vitamin E (which can be from wheat) as well as oats. You will want to avoid these for yourself, of course, too. There are gluten-free versions of everything out there, available from major stores.

Best wishes,

Merika

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Gluten isn't good for anyone. You can live a healthy life gluten-free even if you don't have Celiac Disease. You can raise your child gluten-free, casein-free, or even vegan. Once they get older and want to try new things then they can slowly introduce gluten into ther diet and see how it goes.

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First of all, CONGRATULATIONS on your pregnancy!!!

I agree with everyone else, just keep eating gluten free during your pregnancy. It's a healthy way to eat, even without celiac. People who have to eat gluten free end up eating a lot more whole foods rather than junk food. So you're good there.

As far as feeding your baby, it's always best to breastfeed as long as possible. But if that ends up not being an option for you (it wasn't for me) in the long term, there are a lot more varieties of formula out there now, and I could swear at one point I saw infant formula that was made with rice-milk as a base.

When the time comes for baby food, it's super easy to make your own. Sweet potatoes, for example - you steam them until they're soft and then put them through a food mill. You can buy a food mill that's especially made for making baby food at Babys R Us. When the baby gets older and can eat more chunky food, you can just mash it with a fork. So it IS possible to have pretty good control over what goes into your baby's mouth.

I'm not sure if jarred baby food is considered completely non-contaminated, but the ingredients of sweet potatoes are: Sweet potatoes and water. Even in regular non-celiac circumstances, doctors will tell you to only introduce ONE type of food at a time to your baby so that you can check for food allergies.

As far as celiac goes, if I found out about celiac before I had my kids, I would definitely have the genetic testing done. You can get it through Enterolab for $100. It's just a cheek swab (just like on the talk shows). Enterolab sends it out to a top immunogenetics lab called Laboratories at Bonfils. They test for the celiac genes, as well as the gluten sensitive genes. They email the results to you.

Because I have a doctor who isn't very familiar with celiac (but totally admits it) and family members who basically think I'm making this whole celiac thing up or exagerating it, I talked to Enterolab about sending me paper copies of their results. They also offered to send the original results from Labs at Bonfils. So I'm going to have a piece of paper to put in front of these people.

I'm not sure if a child needs to be a certain age to get the genetic testing done, but I would get a genetic test on my child as soon as possible, just so I would know, rather than cross my fingers and hope they don't get symptoms, or hope I didn't get a pediatrician who didn't know celiac from a hole in the wall.

At this point, I'm pre-diagnosis, just sent in my genetic test to Enterolab, and we'll see what happens with that. If I have positive genetic markers, I'm testing my kids as well. I've got a 3.5 yo and an almost-2yo. I'd rather know what's going on with them NOW then have them sustain damage or symptoms they could avoid.

And bluelotus, I'd like to say I'm shocked and appalled at someone saying that to you. Unfortunately, I'm just appalled. People can just be so cruel and insensitive. Grr...

Nancy

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Hi Neva,

Congrats on the baby!! Your in the final stretch. Your baby is happy and healthy in you - so don't worry.

I have an 8 month old baby girl - my second. I found out about my Celiacs 3 years after the birth of my first child when my health took a dive and doctors gave me the official run arounds! I had the blood test and biopsy - text book celiacs. At least it was a solid answer. My health is great now.

First, I battled with my OB and my gastro to figure out which meds were ok for delivery, for the baby, etc. I was completely paranoid. Finally it was explained to me that all IV meds are gluten-free. So delievery is safe. I packed my own foods for the hospital stay. Equalled a safe delievery and stay at the hopsital. Since I had a gluten reaction every month for the last 6 months of the pregnancy this was big news. Be careful of reactions while pregnant - lots of people have mentioned miscarriages as a side effect of a gluten-free react. For me it was cramps and eventually labor. Terrifying everytime.

Second, DO NOT have the baby blood tested for celiacs until the baby is not being nursed and is consuming gluten. The gastro explained that the baby basically has your blood when born. So the baby would test positive for celiacs if tested at birth. Wait until the baby is consuming gluten to have the test for celiacs. By the way, the formula is gluten-free and so are quite a few of the jared basic baby foods (1st, 2nd, stages), wipes, diaper creams, baby bath, etc. Call around about the baby products and gluten-free safety. Clan Thompson has a good list of products. My baby eats all the glutens, is now on formula, and I stay happily gluten-free. It can be done.

The baby is perfectly happy and healthy. There is a study about the importance of introducing glutens between 3- 6 months. Unlike the rest of the replies, I will gladly feed my children gluten in hopes that they do not have celiacs for life. It's a hard disease, plus we have other food allergies in my immediate family. If I had a choice I would not want this disease, but I adhere to the gluten-free diet and enforce safe food handling for celiacs and allergies in my house. Older kids can learn the rules too.

Best of luck on the rest of your pregnancy. The baby is so amazing at birth- so tiny :D

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I myself am not pregnant though would not like to completely exclude that option for myself in the future.  So, although I can't help you, I am very interested in the responses you get.  According to my docs, even without the biopsy, I am dxd (finally) as celiac disease.  Does this mean I should avoid having kids (rather than risk bringing a sick child into the world) as some suggest?  Is it best to keep kids gluten-free 1) to maintain a gluten-free house and 2) to avoid their illness?  When and how would babies be tested (how long do they have to eat gluten)?  Don't mean to steal you thunder, Neva, with my questions, though they are along the same lines as yours.  Any help from some celiac disease moms would be great and I wish you some luck, Neva with your pregnancy and baby.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I do not understand the reaction of these friends and family. I would have felt hurt and lonely in light of their total lack of support. I hope that at least your husband is understanding and supportive.

My husband does not show any symptoms of being gluten intolerant. When we first got married we were totally gluten free in our first apt. and he only had his gluten treats outside the home. Then we moved and a lot changed and although the meals we enjoy together, particularly dinner, is gluten free...he does have his gluten stuff but it is usually something prepackaged and he is very careful about clean-up and aware of wear/how he eats it. He is, my best friend really, and he could not deny the drastic difference in my physical symptoms and mental and emotional symptoms...

My own parents took a year and a half before they were respectful of my diet even though I told them of my releif. Other people are usually respectful when I just call it a food allergy...they get that more easily, and some food allergies are very serious and I just say it is that way and so even if they do not understand it they know I would get sick if I do not substitute or they work with me.

Anyway, as far as having a baby...I have heard of people having these reactions for children that would be mentally disabled or other things along those lines...but for celiac disease or gluten intolerance ???? Talk about excessive!! I can't beleive that they would call your diet excessive but then go and suggest that maybe you shouldn't reproduce!

So, does that go for the diabetic too? The lactose intolerant? The person with peanut allergies? HELLO??

Every person has to count the cost of child bearing....the financial cost, the effect on the body, the effect on the marriage, etc. and even then ....not everything will be perfect and perfectly ready....thousands of women have babies all over the world and have forever...all in various physical states and various circumstances!

You seem like a thoughtful and loving person. There is no reason why you should not be able to procreate for God's sake ( litterally!)

This is mainly between you and your husband...anyway.

The fact that you have any knowledge of gluten intolerance and access to information on this and other such conditions puts you ahead of the game anyway.

Gimme a break!

Well, everyone has their opinions...and they will continue to come flying at you during pregnancy and after anyway...so maybe on a positive note try to look at this as an oppurtunity to learn how to deal with opinions and other "well meaning advice."

Sometimes you smile and say "I appreciate you sharing your opinion" ...or "oh...that is an interesting thought"....out of respect that they mean well....

BUT sometimes if people cross your boundries ...define them with tact....I think that is respectable. Let them know..." I understand you are saying (yadayadayada) and I know you mean-well and you love me. However when you said that I felt (yadayadayada.) Just like you I want to do the right thing, and I can promise you that my husband and I will do everything we can to do this thing eyes wide open, but out of your love for us we ask that you respect our decisions, as we respect yours."

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The doctor works for you, so he better listen. :lol:  You don't need a dr to agree with you.  You get what you want by telling him what to do.  You can keep your child gluten free and hope that in a few years there will be a new test that doesn't require gluten in the diet in order to test.  Two of my kids are gluten free and don't have celiac disease.  I had them tested.  I'm gluten free and don't have celiac disease.  The diet's not that bad after-all.  There are plenty of tasty foods.  It's like deciding to be a vegetarian or a vegan.  No biggie.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I get what you are saying about the doctor...that is hilariously true!

As far as keeping my child gluten free then testing much later:

1)When I do introduce gluten after they have gone awhile without it even if they are not needing to be gluten-free won't they inevitably have reactions seeing as they have never had gluten?

2)Won't they have a hard time in places like school if I cannot present official notification that they need to be gluten-free.

3)I don't want their to be an unecessary problem in my relationship with the kid because here I made them be gluten-free and maybe they do or do not need to be.

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While you are preg, as you do while not preg, continue eating gluten-free. Breastfeed your baby. You will never have to worry about if this formula or that is gluten-free. Breastfeeding is also the only known variable that will *decrease* the chances of your child having celiac.

It is pretty easy to control a baby/young child's diet. My ds eats gluten-free even though I'm not sure he has celiac. When he gets older (age 5 maybe, when big brain development is passed) we will probably put him on wheat and see what happens then test.

You will need to read ingredients of baby products - a number of them contain wheat germ oil or vitamin E (which can be from wheat) as well as oats. You will want to avoid these for yourself, of course, too. There are gluten-free versions of everything out there, available from major stores.

Best wishes,

Merika

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Why does breastfeeding decreases it?

What products did/do you buy for your child ( like what brands did you use?)

Aren't you afraid of what he will go through when you "see what happens" then test???

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First of all, CONGRATULATIONS on your pregnancy!!! 

I agree with everyone else, just keep eating gluten free during your pregnancy.  It's a healthy way to eat, even without celiac.  People who have to eat gluten free end up eating a lot more whole foods rather than junk food.  So you're good there. 

As far as feeding your baby, it's always best to breastfeed as long as possible.  But if that ends up not being an option for you (it wasn't for me) in the long term, there are a lot more varieties of formula out there now, and I could swear at one point I saw infant formula that was made with rice-milk as a base. 

When the time comes for baby food, it's super easy to make your own.  Sweet potatoes, for example - you steam them until they're soft and then put them through a food mill.  You can buy a food mill that's especially made for making baby food at Babys R Us.  When the baby gets older and can eat more chunky food, you can just mash it with a fork.  So it IS possible to have pretty good control over what goes into your baby's mouth. 

I'm not sure if jarred baby food is considered completely non-contaminated, but the ingredients of sweet potatoes are:  Sweet potatoes and water.  Even in regular non-celiac circumstances, doctors will tell you to only introduce ONE type of food at a time to your baby so that you can check for food allergies.

As far as celiac goes, if I found out about celiac before I had my kids, I would definitely have the genetic testing done.  You can get it through Enterolab for $100.  It's just a cheek swab (just like on the talk shows).  Enterolab sends it out to a top immunogenetics lab called Laboratories at Bonfils.  They test for the celiac genes, as well as the gluten sensitive genes.  They email the results to you. 

Because I have a doctor who isn't very familiar with celiac (but totally admits it) and family members who basically think I'm making this whole celiac thing up or exagerating it, I talked to Enterolab about sending me paper copies of their results.  They also offered to send the original results from Labs at Bonfils.  So I'm going to have a piece of paper to put in front of these people. 

I'm not sure if a child needs to be a certain age to get the genetic testing done, but I would get a genetic test on my child as soon as possible, just so I would know, rather than cross my fingers and hope they don't get symptoms, or hope I didn't get a pediatrician who didn't know celiac from a hole in the wall. 

At this point, I'm pre-diagnosis, just sent in my genetic test to Enterolab, and we'll see what happens with that.  If I have positive genetic markers, I'm testing my kids as well.  I've got a 3.5 yo and an almost-2yo.  I'd rather know what's going on with them NOW then have them sustain damage or symptoms they could avoid. 

And bluelotus, I'd like to say I'm shocked and appalled at someone saying that to you.  Unfortunately, I'm just appalled.  People can just be so cruel and insensitive.  Grr...

Nancy

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Would doctors and hospitals respect the results of the entrolab genetic test?

Will the test result be the same on or off a gluten-free diet?

Do you have to have the genetic marker for it in order to be gluten intolerant?

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Hi Neva,

Congrats on the baby!! Your in the final stretch. Your baby is happy and healthy in you - so don't worry.

I have an 8 month old baby girl - my second. I found out about my Celiacs 3 years after the birth of my first child when my health took a dive and doctors gave me the official run arounds!  I had the blood test and biopsy - text book celiacs. At least it was a solid answer. My health is great now.

First, I battled with my OB and my gastro to figure out which meds were ok for delivery, for the baby, etc. I was completely paranoid. Finally it was explained to me that all IV meds are gluten-free. So delievery is safe. I packed my own foods for the hospital stay. Equalled a safe delievery and stay at the hopsital. Since I had a gluten reaction every month for the last 6 months of the pregnancy this was big news. Be careful of reactions while pregnant - lots of people have mentioned miscarriages as a side effect of a gluten-free react. For me it was cramps and eventually labor. Terrifying everytime.

Second, DO NOT have the baby blood tested for celiacs until the baby is not being nursed and is consuming gluten. The gastro explained that the baby basically has your blood when born. So the baby would test positive for celiacs if tested at birth. Wait until the baby is consuming gluten to have the test for celiacs. By the way, the formula is gluten-free and so are quite a few of the jared basic baby foods (1st, 2nd, stages), wipes, diaper creams, baby bath, etc. Call around about the baby products and gluten-free safety. Clan Thompson has a good list of products. My baby eats all the glutens, is now on formula, and I stay happily gluten-free. It can be done.

The baby is perfectly happy and healthy. There is a study about the importance of introducing glutens between 3- 6 months. Unlike the rest of the replies, I will gladly feed my children gluten in hopes that they do not have celiacs for life. It's a hard disease, plus we have other food allergies in my immediate family. If I had a choice I would not want this disease, but I adhere to the gluten-free diet and enforce safe food handling for celiacs and allergies in my house. Older kids can learn the rules too.

Best of luck on the rest of your pregnancy.  The baby is so amazing at birth- so tiny :D

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

thank you for the best wishes and congrats from you and everyone else it made me feel really good!

What other brands would you recommend besides Clan Thompson?

Wait, are you saying that if I have been contaminated I have a chance to miscarry?

With my cravings I have eaten out a LOT and we were just talking about cutting that back hugely...and I have been as careful as I would be for myself but I did not realize that contamination could cause me to miscarry...please confirm....and when you mentioned that I am in the final stretch do you mean that if the baby is ok now then the baby will most likely continue to be fine???

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Would doctors and hospitals respect the results of the entrolab genetic test?

Will the test result be the same on or off a gluten-free diet?

Do you have to have the genetic marker for it in order to be gluten intolerant?

Here is my understanding of it: You can carry the gene but not develop celiac. I am not sure if there is a defined relationship between gluten intolerance and celiac, though I think most believe the intolerance/sensitivity may develop into celiac disease in time. Only about 90-94% of celiacs have the gene, so the test is not 100%, though close (I don't know how many in the general population carry these genes though and don't actually have celiac). The genes associated with celiac belong to a class of genes (HLA) that seem to be associated with chronic illness. Genes are funny things, not only do they interact with one another (genes can be linked and interacting, so having a gene for something doesn't always mean you will express that trait), they also, in general, need a trigger - I remember reading (in various places) that for celiac disease, things like stress, viruses, and even pregnancy can start the process of the illness.

You can read more about the gene test and genetics of celiac disease in "Dangerous Grains" by J. Braly and R. Hoggan. This has been a helpful resource for me.

Also, your other questions: your genes don't change with diet, so even if you are gluten-free, a gene test would likely be positive. I believe this is why many use this test - if they started a gluten-free diet b/c of symptoms but didn't wait for a biopsy, the gene test is a 'test' they can do without having to go back on gluten. Hope this info helps some!

And thank you, Neva, for your kind comments. I have always pictured myself as having a baby at some point and those comments hurt and made me question my dreams and what I believed for myself. This forum has helped me realize that I am not so strange, that there are others going through similar circumstances, and I appreciate this topic in particular. I hope you have a great, healthy pregnancy. Keep us posted.

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Here is my understanding of it: You can carry the gene but not develop celiac. I am not sure if there is a defined relationship between gluten intolerance and celiac, though I think most believe the intolerance/sensitivity may develop into celiac disease in time. Only about 90-94% of celiacs have the gene, so the test is not 100%, though close (I don't know how many in the general population carry these genes though and don't actually have celiac). The genes associated with celiac belong to a class of genes (HLA) that seem to be associated with chronic illness. Genes are funny things, not only do they interact with one another (genes can be linked and interacting, so having a gene for something doesn't always mean you will express that trait), they also, in general, need a trigger - I remember reading (in various places) that for celiac disease, things like stress, viruses, and even pregnancy can start the process of the illness.

You can read more about the gene test and genetics of celiac disease in "Dangerous Grains" by J. Braly and R. Hoggan. This has been a helpful resource for me.

Also, your other questions: your genes don't change with diet, so even if you are gluten-free, a gene test would likely be positive. I believe this is why many use this test - if they started a gluten-free diet b/c of symptoms but didn't wait for a biopsy, the gene test is a 'test' they can do without having to go back on gluten. Hope this info helps some!

And thank you, Neva, for your kind comments. I have always pictured myself as having a baby at some point and those comments hurt and made me question my dreams and what I believed for myself. This forum has helped me realize that I am not so strange, that there are others going through similar circumstances, and I appreciate this topic in particular. I hope you have a great, healthy pregnancy. Keep us posted.

Thank you for answering my questions.

I actually do have a copy of Dangerous Grains! I read it nearly three years ago though :)

I will talk to my husband about the entrolab thing and do some online research.

I am so, so, so glad that you feel more positive about the future and the possibilities there! I was thinking about your comment there and I thought to myself that I personally can't imagine thinking otherwise! I mean, there is a lot going on these days that just wasn't "normal," years and years ago that is now considered normal and acceptable but it is awkward and strange...but there is a lot that wasn't "normal," or known before that is now acceptable and freeing and helpful for moving on and living life in spite of ...life stuff!

You will always find a TON of support on here! I think in general the people you connect with on here pretty much take pride in the fact that so many doors have opened up in the past few years; they will freely discuss that with you, experiment along side you, and even though it sounds a bit cliche' they will laugh and cry with you.

Since I have not been officially diagnosed I am not part of a physical support group in my area. This board is what I've got in that way and it has done soooo much for me!

Welcome to a great resource! :D

Thank you for sending your best wishes toward my new family, once again. We are very excited. All I have ever wanted is a healthy family...in every way that is; that is my dream. Best wishes to you and your husband, and your bright future together! ;)

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First of all, CONGRATULATIONS on your pregnancy!!!

I agree with everyone else, just keep eating gluten free during your pregnancy. It's a healthy way to eat, even without celiac. People who have to eat gluten free end up eating a lot more whole foods rather than junk food. So you're good there.

As far as feeding your baby, it's always best to breastfeed as long as possible. But if that ends up not being an option for you (it wasn't for me) in the long term, there are a lot more varieties of formula out there now, and I could swear at one point I saw infant formula that was made with rice-milk as a base.

When the time comes for baby food, it's super easy to make your own. Sweet potatoes, for example - you steam them until they're soft and then put them through a food mill. You can buy a food mill that's especially made for making baby food at Babys R Us. When the baby gets older and can eat more chunky food, you can just mash it with a fork. So it IS possible to have pretty good control over what goes into your baby's mouth.

I'm not sure if jarred baby food is considered completely non-contaminated, but the ingredients of sweet potatoes are: Sweet potatoes and water. Even in regular non-celiac circumstances, doctors will tell you to only introduce ONE type of food at a time to your baby so that you can check for food allergies.

As far as celiac goes, if I found out about celiac before I had my kids, I would definitely have the genetic testing done. You can get it through Enterolab for $100. It's just a cheek swab (just like on the talk shows). Enterolab sends it out to a top immunogenetics lab called Laboratories at Bonfils. They test for the celiac genes, as well as the gluten sensitive genes. They email the results to you.

Because I have a doctor who isn't very familiar with celiac (but totally admits it) and family members who basically think I'm making this whole celiac thing up or exagerating it, I talked to Enterolab about sending me paper copies of their results. They also offered to send the original results from Labs at Bonfils. So I'm going to have a piece of paper to put in front of these people.

I'm not sure if a child needs to be a certain age to get the genetic testing done, but I would get a genetic test on my child as soon as possible, just so I would know, rather than cross my fingers and hope they don't get symptoms, or hope I didn't get a pediatrician who didn't know celiac from a hole in the wall.

At this point, I'm pre-diagnosis, just sent in my genetic test to Enterolab, and we'll see what happens with that. If I have positive genetic markers, I'm testing my kids as well. I've got a 3.5 yo and an almost-2yo. I'd rather know what's going on with them NOW then have them sustain damage or symptoms they could avoid.

And bluelotus, I'd like to say I'm shocked and appalled at someone saying that to you. Unfortunately, I'm just appalled. People can just be so cruel and insensitive. Grr...

Nancy

:lol:

What is the TTG test from York? I had all your symptoms. I am having the exact same numbers of Igg and Iga. I am planned for an endoscopy in January. But, the GI says I have to eat gluten again after 3 months of gluten-free diet. Do you understand why?

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You sound really concerned but take a deep breath and realize that first of all by eating a gluten free diet you are already doing the best thing for your baby. Second, breast feed as long as you can when the baby is born that helps in diminishing their chances of developing the illness. Third be extremely vigilant when you are introducing solids. Make sure you introduce new foods slowly and give a decent amount of time in between new foods. Lastly, watch for symptoms in babies - lack of weight gain etc... And mostly enjoy your wonderful pregnancy. I was diagnosed during my second pregnancy and it vastly improved my health. The most important thing to remember is absorbtion of nutrients - your body will take care of the baby if you take care of yourself.

as far as lotions etc... stick to natural products. anything that is totally natural will diminish any chances of gluten contamination.

good luck with your pregancy and birth !

I have not been officially diagnosed but tried gluten free diet a few years ago and found several symptoms releived. I thought of getting tested but was concerned about the cost, and with the time I would have to take to go back on gluten and wade through symptoms again I ould not afford that either. I've been gluten-free about three years now, and was told many times that the changes in me represent the best diagnosis. I thought that was ok, but what about when I become pregnant?

Now I am pregnant. I am in my second trimester...16 wks.

I have been reading some of these posts cause I was wondering what products specifically manstream someone might reccomend for babies...food, lotions etc.

And I get that there is some sort of deal with giving the baby gluten or something at a cirtain time....I am confused...

I don't get when, how, or why we would do this...

And if I have never been officially tested would a doctor listen to me and test my baby?

And another reason I just tried the diet personally I did try asking doctors and started to get the run around and I don't want that for my baby.

Someone in a post mentioned that they would not put a child through gluten-free diet if there is a chance they don't have to...but on the other hand to have them experience physical and or emotional discomfort ...any help????????????

:rolleyes:

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I am pregnant and have celiac disease. I've known since I was 17. I'm now 28. I have 2 children who do not have celiac disease.I'm not sure how it runs in families. I know that my grandmother had it. But my parents and my sisters do not. I guess if my kids started showing any signs of being sick, I would have them tested. I'm not too worried about passing it along to my kids. If it happens, I will cross that bridge when I get there. I would not stop having kids because I have celiac disease. That is just my opinion. Being gluten free isn't that big of a deal to me anymore. I know what I can and can't eat and stick with it.

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