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Deades

Test your children?

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I was recently and surprisingly diagnosed June 1.  I am in my late 50s and have two children ages 21 and 19.  I understand Celiac is heredity.  I have no physical symptoms which is why I was surprised at the diagnosis.  My kids don't exhibit symptoms either.  I have always been anemic and my kids hemoglobin always was within range.  Do I have my kids get a blood test or not?

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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All first degree relatives should be tested every 2 years in the absence of symptoms or immediately if symptoms present. It is hereditary and can present at any age. Make sure they are eating gluten daily for at least 3 months before testing if they have been gluten free. 

 

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Gluten free Dec. 2011
Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Reynaud's October 2018

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Better to catch a celiac disease diagnosis early.  Experts do recommend the testing of all first-degree relatives even if asymptomatic and while on a full gluten-containing diet.   I had my kid screened and requested a full panel since I test oddly.  She was also screened for anemia.  That was about three years ago.  We are considering running the panel again, but Not until she is back at school and on a daily diet of gluten (our home is gluten free and she is gluten light in the summer).  

Celiac disease can cause long term issues.  You have osteoporosis besides anemia, right?  I bet you might have some other issues that can resolve on a gluten free diet that you just chocked up to getting old.  Wouldn't be nice to prevent such damage in your kids?  Wish I had known about celiac disease a long time ago!  

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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On 6/24/2017 at 5:44 PM, Deades said:

I was recently and surprisingly diagnosed June 1.  I am in my late 50s and have two children ages 21 and 19.  I understand Celiac is heredity.  I have no physical symptoms which is why I was surprised at the diagnosis.  My kids don't exhibit symptoms either.  I have always been anemic and my kids hemoglobin always was within range.  Do I have my kids get a blood test or not?

I tested positive in November and immediately had my toddler tested, though he didn't have symptoms (aside from being really little). He has it.

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Yes, definitely! The sooner they find out if they have it, the sooner they can heal up and, as cyclinglady said, avoid a lot of potential long term health issues. Also be aware that, with bloodtests, false negatives are more common than false positives. I'd recommend they get a full bloodwork panel done to check for vitamin deficiencies, which could in itself be a sign of malabsorption problems. I had iron anemia as a teenager, which looking back was probably my first Celiac symptom. My mom and my sister both have Celiac as well.

You could also suggest that your parents or any siblings get tested as well.

 


~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.

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