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zachsmom

Hydrolized What Not......

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I have been reading labels for fun again... ( not really but .. )

I have forgotten what conclusion we came to ...

If the source of the hydrolized ingredient isnt listed... its coming from wheat.. if its listed say hydrolized starch from corn ...

Its coming form the listed source. and you then have to determine if you can handle the source right ...

So if the source is listed and you arent allergic .. your okay ... but if its not listed .. its wheat and you need to move on ... down the food asile...

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In the US, any packaged food item that contains wheat must clearly include the word "wheat" on the label.

Here's some further information on the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act:

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/healthinfo...nglaws2006.html

The law does not cover rye and barley. I tend to avoid hydrolyzed things in general so I could be wrong, but I've never heard of hydrolyzed rye or hydrolyzed barley (but that's not to say it doesn't exist :huh: )


"Let food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be food." - Hippocrates

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hydrolized is only a process, just like "modified," so the same rules apply. As mango mentioned, if it is wheat, it has to be listed, and I've never see a barley or rye, either.

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In the US, any packaged food item that contains wheat must clearly include the word "wheat" on the label.

Here's some further information on the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act:

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/healthinfo...nglaws2006.html

The law does not cover rye and barley. I tend to avoid hydrolized things in general so I could be wrong, but I've never heard of hydrolized rye or hydrolized barley (but that's not to say it doesn't exist :huh: )

This is true but does not make us safe yet, the excerpt is from the link listed:

"A caution:

The Act applies to all product labels created after Jan 1, 2006. Be aware that there will be a transition period of undetermined length during which products that were labeled prior to the law taking effect will remain on store shelves and in home pantries. This is especially crucial for children with food allergies, who may think that all product labels magically changed on the law's effective date."

Labels can be run in very large batches, it is always best to call and identify the source if unlisted.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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And, a caveat to that :), would be that the law was signed August 2004, and took effect Jan 1, 2006, so companies had plenty of time to start adjusting---considering that we are now 1 year into the law, and 2.5 years since it was passed.

Not to say that they all did right away, by any means at all, but, this law had plenty of forethought and warning to companies.

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This is true but does not make us safe yet, the excerpt is from the link listed:

"A caution:

The Act applies to all product labels created after Jan 1, 2006. Be aware that there will be a transition period of undetermined length during which products that were labeled prior to the law taking effect will remain on store shelves and in home pantries. This is especially crucial for children with food allergies, who may think that all product labels magically changed on the law's effective date."

Labels can be run in very large batches, it is always best to call and identify the source if unlisted.

Yes, labels can be run in large batches, but the operative idea here is "were labeled prior to the law taking effect ." That is to say, if the product was manufactured on or after that date, it must clearly label wheat. All "old" labelling had to be used up by December 31, 2005, or be discarded. So, anything not subject to the new law must be over a year old at this point. I doubt that there is much left on store shelves.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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does any one know what happens to the food when it is hydrolized? I know wheat is added somehow but .... just asking...

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does any one know what happens to the food when it is hydrolized? I know wheat is added somehow but .... just asking...

They don't add wheat, they take a protein, whether it's soy, wheat, corn etc., and break it down somehow using enzymes or acids.


"Let food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be food." - Hippocrates

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does any one know what happens to the food when it is hydrolized? I know wheat is added somehow but .... just asking...

As mentioned above, the hydrolization process partially breaks down the protein. No wheat is added. There is only a concern if the protein was gluten to begin with, which it almost never is. In North America, it is most likely to be soy (which must be labeled in the US as required by FALCPA) or corn.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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