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grey

Vitamin D Recommendations?

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Hi,

Just had a dexa scan, and sure enough, I have osteopenia. My doctor has ordered me to take Vitamin D, 400 IU, 1-2x/day, retest in 6 mos.

I hoped someone could recommend a vitamin D. I was on prescription vitamin D for a short while; my blood serum levels were really low. Now, however, she's written OTC and I have to find something.

Also, how do I know whether to take 1 or 2 doses? Does the deep bone pain I'm having connect to the osteopenia?

Any other osteopenia recommendations? I knew this was a distinct possibility w/ celiac, but it's still disconcerting since I'm in my early 30s.

Thanks for reading another question from me!

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Ursula knows a lot about this, but unfortunately she's on vacation. I know she says that cod liver oil is the best, and I've read elsewhere that, since vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin, the non-oil based pills aren't very well absorbed.

It's a popular supplement on this forum so I'm sure you'll get more input. Maybe try the search function at the top of the page.

And just as a reference, I was taking 5000U/day. And I just saw a talk wherein the MD described patients with malabsorption taking 500,000 U/day (no, that's not a typo). So you might want to go with 2x/day.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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Hi Grey,

I take Nature Made brand. Rite Aid and CVS Pharmacies carry this brand. It says right on the label that it doesn't contain gluten.

Cindy


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease April 2005

Diabetic

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From an article that just came out.

Sunlight and Artificial Ultraviolet B Radiation

Sensible sun exposure can provide an adequate amount of vitamin D3, which is stored in body fat and released during the winter, when vitamin D3 cannot be produced. Exposure of arms and legs for 5 to 30 minutes (depending on time of day, season, latitude, and skin pigmentation) between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. twice a week is often adequate. Exposure to one minimal erythemal dose while wearing only a bathing suit is equivalent to ingestion of approximately 20,000 IU of vitamin D2. The skin has a great capacity to make vitamin D3, even in the elderly, to reduce the risk of fracture. Most tanning beds emit 2 to 6% ultraviolet B radiation and are a recommended source of vitamin D3 when used in moderation. Tanners had robust levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (approximately 45 ng per milliliter [112 nmol per liter]) at the end of the winter and higher bone density as compared with nontanners (with levels of approximately 18 ng per milliliter [45 nmol per liter]).For patients with fat malabsorption, exposure to a tanning bed for 30 to 50% of the time recommended for tanning (with sunscreen on the face) is an excellent means of treating and preventing vitamin D deficiency (Table 3). This reduces the risk of skin cancers associated with ultraviolet B radiation.

Vitamin D Intoxication

Vitamin D intoxication is extremely rare but can be caused by inadvertent or intentional ingestion of excessively high doses. Doses of more than 50,000 IU per day raise levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D to more than 150 ng per milliliter (374 nmol per liter) and are associated with hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. Doses of 10,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day for up to 5 months, however, do not cause toxicity.Patients with chronic granulomatous disorders are more sensitive to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels above 30 ng per milliliter because of macrophage production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, which causes hypercalciuria and hypercalcemia. In these patients, however, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels need to be maintained at approximately 20 to 30 ng per milliliter to prevent vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism (Table 3).


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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vit D, which should be in the form of D3, not D2, is not sufficient. a study a while ago found that magnesium was the most important thing for treating osteoporosis in celiacs. you might look into that as well, along with weight bearing exercise.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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Hi Grey,

I take Calchichew - D3 Forte from Shires Pharmaceuticals,

they are quoted as Gluten and Lactose Free.

I take 1 Tablet twice a day.

.

David


Chronically Ill and lost 56lbs in 3 Months Prior to Diagnosis.

Diagnosed in Nov 2005 after Biopsy and Blood Tests

Cannot tolerate Codex Wheat Starch.

Self Taught Baker.

Bake everything from scratch using naturally gluten-free ingredients.

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http://vitamindcouncil.com

I take 2000 iu of oil-based D3, Cholecalciferol (Carlson Laboratories), per day. 400iu is probably not nearly enough based on new research. Avoid Ergocalciferol and only get your D3 that is in gel capsules and is oil based and is not combined with anything else, like calcium. You can look up the reasons why at http://heartscandoctor.blogspot.com and search for vitamin d.

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Thanks for all the info everyone. I'll talk to my md about upping the amount. I knew there was a certain of vitamin D I should be taking, but vaguely remembered there were other issues about type, etc.

I also have vague memory (I hate not having recall for reading, dratted celiac!) of reading that you should also avoid certain foods before and after taking it. Has anyone run into this?

thanks!

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You should take it with fat, it is a fat soluable vitamin. It's also good to take it with calcium and magnesium (not in the same tablet as the D3). You might want to look into vitamin K2. That heartscan doctor blog talks about it as well, but basically it causes your body to deposit calcium into the bones, not the heart!

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Hello grey,

Since Nov 2006, I discovered that I am borderline osteoporosis. I had a lot of bone and muscle pain. So the doctor finally ordered a vitamin D test as a last resort. I was Vitamin D deficient. D2=8.3 and D3=14.

At first the doctor said to take 800 IU per day. Then later that day she called me to say that she wanted me to take 16,000 IU of vitamin D2 liquid for 3 weeks. Since it was an OTC product and costs $100 per week I decided that I would not be taking more than one week of it. I researched vitamin D at the Vitamin D Council website and found a wealth of information. I have since been taking 5,000 IU of a powdered form of Vitamin D3 and within 90 days my D2=11 and D3=43.

I was having lots of problems with calcium making me sick until I added the mega doses of Vitamin D. Now I can take the liquid calcium without any side effects and I have noticed that the pain has subsided somewhat.

Even though my Vitamin D3 levels are increasing, it it taking time to heal. I suspect it will be a lengthy process. But at least I'm headed in the right direction.

'Hope you are finding the answers you seek.


akceliac

Gluten-free Casein-free since 1996

"For I the Lord thy God will hold thy right hand, saying unto thee, Fear not; I will help thee." Isa 41:13

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Direct sunshine onto the skin is the best delivery system for D3, by far. Twenty minutes a day is enough. I now make a point of being out in the sun with as much skin exposed as possible (difficult during Ottawa winters!) for my half-hour shift, each day. Much cheaper, as well, than supplements! :)


Emily

diagnosed type one diabetic 1973

diagnosed celiac winter 2005

diagnosed hypothyroid spring 2006

But healthy and happy! 253.gif

11 year-old Son had negative blood panel, but went on gluten-free diet of his own volition to see if his concentration would improve, his temper abate, and his energy level would increase. Miraculous response!

The great are great only because we are on our knees.

--Pierre Joseph Proudhon (1809-1865)

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Any other osteopenia recommendations? I knew this was a distinct possibility w/ celiac, but it's still disconcerting since I'm in my early 30s.

Osteopenia here, too. Cause thought to be two or three rounds of Prednisone.

Following the diet and doing whatever you can to improve your digestion and/or heal leaky gut will help. Also extremely important: weight bearing exercise. A serious weight training program along with regular walking has my bone density improving. And that's without calcium/D supplementation. Not saying you shouldn't supplement, but just to point out the weight bearing exercise plays a key role.

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I have read on Mercola .com that Cod liver oil is the best way to get vit d for all but the summer months if you get a lot of sun. Then you can take regular fish oil. Carlsons, or nordic naturals are best.

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