Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

mama2two

Got Enterolab Results

Recommended Posts

well we got my daughter's results from enterolab and she does have gluten sensitivity and has genes for celiac dx, so maybe she has this also. she was out of the normal range in everything but nothing extreme, but they said that she should be gluten-free for the rest of her life. this is not what she wanted to hear but it is no use to dwell on it, I will do my best to find replacements for whatever she wants and cannot have. I will just have to think positve and pray. My husband wants to show the results to my brother in law who is a physician. I hope they do not get on the kick about the lab not being reputable. I am tired to trying to prove or disprove whether or not she needs to be on the diet, and her pedi was happy enough with just the postive response to the diet to prove it to her, so that should have been proof enough. she also cannot tolerate dairy according to her results she is having an autoimmune response to dairy, well she has never tolerated or liked dairy since birth, exp. she does like ice cream occasionally. I so wish there was a support group here, to help us through this! this forum is great, but to acctually see people in person has a greater impact and I so want her to meet other children who have to be gluten free too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


How old is your daughter? When mine first got dx i cried, for the first month (between the blood work and biopsy was a month) and then i just said "go blow every one, pull yourself together and you'll manage") Well, about 7 months since then, sure there are times when i feel my daughter is not eating the best of stuff, and that it is a bit monotonous for her, and sometimes i don't have any left over from supper the night before to give her for lunch the next day... BUT at least i can see that she is growing up, she is happy and healthy, putting on weight, that she is just herself... know what i mean? The firstmonth or two were killers, but now when people ask me how imanage, i say "whats there to manage? it's my daughters health!"

she still asks for some things - she loved bread, and i haven't yet made or bought any, and she hates the store bought biscuits... but she is so excited that she has pretzels like her friends! and now adays if i offer her a choice of chocolate or melon/mango she'll choose the fruit :D so there is definately some pluses ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

"I hope they do not get on the kick about the lab not being reputable"

Enterolab's gene test is reputable - it's my understanding they go through the same lab as the Red Cross. There are some that argue about whether or not any non-Celiac genes equate to gluten sensitivity (which is what Enterolab's doctor advocates), but you cannot argue that HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 are genes linked to Celiac Disease. If your child has one of these genes, your child is definitely at risk of having Celiac Disease. With a positive response and the gene, there are many "reputable" doctors that would give your child a positive Celiac Disease diagnosis. And when a person is under the ill effects of Celiac Disease because they are being exposed to gluten, the first enzyme to go inside the intestines is the one that breaks down lactose. So going dairy free for at least the first few months (some say one month, others suggest up to 6 months) is a good idea. You can always try to introduce it later after your daughter has healed more.

And as Shan stated, it's difficult at first to adjust, but eventually you and your daughter will. Every once in awhile, you will always have a "pity party" (hard not to, I mean, why does everyone else get to grab some KFC and bring it home for dinner on those nights when they just can't cook one more meal and I can't???), but overall, when you see your child healthy and you think back to what it was like before when things were more "convenient", really you wouldn't have it any other way.

And, in some ways, we've never had better tasting food than we have in the last year and a half. If you want to eat tasty things, you still can and be gluten free (and dairy free, too). It just takes a little time to figure it all out.

And I noticed you live in Louisiana, are you anywhere near Baton Rouge? There's a support group there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

"I hope they do not get on the kick about the lab not being reputable"

Enterolab's gene test is reputable - it's my understanding they go through the same lab as the Red Cross. There are some that argue about whether or not any non-Celiac genes equate to gluten sensitivity (which is what Enterolab's doctor advocates), but you cannot argue that HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 are genes linked to Celiac Disease. If your child has one of these genes, your child is definitely at risk of having Celiac Disease. With a positive response and the gene, there are many "reputable" doctors that would give your child a positive Celiac Disease diagnosis. And when a person is under the ill effects of Celiac Disease because they are being exposed to gluten, the first enzyme to go inside the intestines is the one that breaks down lactose. So going dairy free for at least the first few months (some say one month, others suggest up to 6 months) is a good idea. You can always try to introduce it later after your daughter has healed more.

And as Shan stated, it's difficult at first to adjust, but eventually you and your daughter will. Every once in awhile, you will always have a "pity party" (hard not to, I mean, why does everyone else get to grab some KFC and bring it home for dinner on those nights when they just can't cook one more meal and I can't???), but overall, when you see your child healthy and you think back to what it was like before when things were more "convenient", really you wouldn't have it any other way.

And, in some ways, we've never had better tasting food than we have in the last year and a half. If you want to eat tasty things, you still can and be gluten free (and dairy free, too). It just takes a little time to figure it all out.

And I noticed you live in Louisiana, are you anywhere near Baton Rouge? There's a support group there.

I am about an hour away from baton rouge, and we are planning to attend the next meeting in nov. Her enterolab results also showed that she is having an autoimmune reaction to dairy. She does not like dairy, except for chocolate and occasionally ice cream. I can't take those away too, esp. not right before halloween, but I will try to lay off of them. I know that the gluten can cause damage, does the dairy cause just as much damage?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Dark chocolate (which is the healthier kind) doesn't have gluten (though depending on the brand, there may be cross contamination or milk or even gluten), only milk chocolate. Also, there are some gluten free/dairy free ice creams out there, even some recipes, too (there's a vegan pumpkin ice cream recipe that actually looks delicious). You can check out the "baking & cooking tips" link here - several people post recipes that are both. And I know they'd be happy to point you in the right direction. And if dairy really is a problem, you may not see any improvement with her visible symptoms unless you get her off of both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Dark chocolate (which is the healthier kind) doesn't have gluten (though depending on the brand, there may be cross contamination or milk or even gluten), only milk chocolate. Also, there are some gluten free/dairy free ice creams out there, even some recipes, too (there's a vegan pumpkin ice cream recipe that actually looks delicious). You can check out the "baking & cooking tips" link here - several people post recipes that are both. And I know they'd be happy to point you in the right direction. And if dairy really is a problem, you may not see any improvement with her visible symptoms unless you get her off of both.

This is excellent advice! But I want to point out that not all milk chocolate has gluten in it. Plain Hershey bars are gluten-free, as are plain M&Ms, and more. Conversely, while plain dark chocolate should be fine, you always need to double check.


-Sarah

--Son, Lucas, age 7. Gluten-free since May 2007

--Son, Ezra, age 5. Gluten-free 10/13/07. Bipolar tendencies, massively improved on gluten-free diet! He's also allergic to a jillion antibiotics.

--My mother has Celiac Disease, dx'ed by Positive Blood Tests and Biopsy. Diagnosed Sarcoidosis 6/08.

--Myself, Gluten-free since 8/07

Time heals all hurt of heart... but time must be won.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Ugg, what a typo. I meant dark chocolate doesn't have milk! Thanks for catching that! And yes, lots of milk chocolate doesn't have gluten, too. Thank goodness - in my opinion milk & dark chocolate is a necessary food group in and of itself! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Unfortunately, some dark chocolate does have milk, like Hershey's. You always have to check.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

what dark chocolates are casein and gluten free. I would love me some chocolate, i dont care the price either lol

paula

I don't have a comprehensive list, but here are some.

Green & Black: here is their allergen list

http://www.greenandblacks.com/us/nutritionalarea.php

Dagoba dark chocolate:

http://www.dagobachocolate.com/about/ingre...tion.asp#gluten

Endangered Species dark chocolate: except for the one that also has white chocolate; this link shows the gluten-free status, you can link from here to ingredients for specific products

http://www.chocolatebar.com/ingredients.asp

A number of the Trader's Joe chocolates are listed as gluten free:

http://www.traderjoes.com/Attachments/gluten_free.pdf

You would have to check for milk on the labels. Also, I've seen warning labels on these about the CC potential.

If you google on gluten free dark chocolate you will probably find some lists. I've just given you the ones I find readily available. I also try to buy only organic, fair trade chocolate that doesn't use child labor, which cuts out most of the major brands out there. The issues involved and some other brands one can check out:

http://www.thegreenguide.com/reports/produ...?id=6&sec=3


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

what dark chocolates are casein and gluten free. I would love me some chocolate, i dont care the price either lol

paula

enjoylife makes some gfcfsf chocolate chips which I use to eat, bake with,melt down and they are yummy.

http://enjoylifefoods.com/our_foods/chocolate_chips.html


Janel (me): gluten-free since 4/10/07; casien free 5/1/07;soy light 10/07

**LOST 35 lbs since April 2007(much needed weight loss)**

ds(6 yrs)- gluten-free since 3/19/07; casein free 5/2/07;soy free 10/07

HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 7,7)

new dx= Hirschsprungs Disease w/cecostomy

the non believers, only allergen free eatting at home because they have to be:

Hubby: refuses to eat Gluten-free Casein-free except for dinner

dd(14 yrs)- refuses to go along with any special dietary retrictions *I suspect dairy/wheat intollerant*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

enjoylife makes some gfcfsf chocolate chips which I use to eat, bake with,melt down and they are yummy.

http://enjoylifefoods.com/our_foods/chocolate_chips.html

I have been looking for them for so long and cant find them in stores, i really didnt want to order online only for those but im thinking its about time i do that before the holidays hit, i have to bake for the holidays or ill go crazy. Do you know if u can make fudge with them and they taste like real fudge.

paula


gluten, casein and soy free

on low carb/low sugar diet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter



Join eNewsletter