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kay's mommom

Caramel Color/maltodextrin...gluten-free?

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Im new on here and I need some help. I just recieved a list of gluten containing foods to avoid in the mail and it says caramel color, malt, and dextrin are some ingredients to avoid. Is maltodextrin also bad for celiac? Also, I have eaten foods saying gluten-free and have checked the ingredients to make sure but some say caramel color. Does anyone know if caramel color contains gluten?

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If you are in North America, neither caramel color nor maltodextrin is a cause for concern. They are made from corn.

Malt must be avoided since it is almost always made from barley which is a source of gluten.

Outside North America, it is possible that caramel color or maltodextrin could be made from wheat. Both of these are highly processed, and so even if the source is from wheat, there is generally no detectable gluten in the ingredient. Since they are a very small component of the finished food, I don't worry about them. However, if you want to take a zero-tolerance position, you may want to investigate the origin of these ingredients if the food containing them is produced in Europe. To me, no detectable gluten in an ingredient comprising a very small fraction of the finished product is just not a cause for worry.

Others may have different views; these are mine.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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I think it also depends on the level of sensitivity. Also we don't really know where some company might get the caramel coloring they use in ginger ale or something. It has always given me problems when I forget to read a label or someone has changed how they make something. In Hawaii we have this idiotic law saying that as long as a producer adds 51% value to a product it can be called Made in Hawaii. So people bring things in really cheap made in china or Malaysia mark up the price and call it local. It's not and often contains items that celiacs need to stay away from.

I'm extremely sensitive to any amount of gluten which for the past two years my body does not let me forget.

Ken

If you are in North America, neither caramel color nor maltodextrin is a cause for concern. They are made from corn.

Malt must be avoided since it is almost always made from barley which is a source of gluten.

Outside North America, it is possible that caramel color or maltodextrin could be made from wheat. Both of these are highly processed, and so even if the source is from wheat, there is generally no detectable gluten in the ingredient. Since they are a very small component of the finished food, I don't worry about them. However, if you want to take a zero-tolerance position, you may want to investigate the origin of these ingredients if the food containing them is produced in Europe. To me, no detectable gluten in an ingredient comprising a very small fraction of the finished product is just not a cause for worry.

Others may have different views; these are mine.


"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Carmel coloring is made by heating a starch, and that starch can be a gluten grain starch. Most times it is corn but not always. You do need to check with those. Be aware though that if it tests below a certain level the company can say it is gluten free so it is best to ask where the carmel color comes from rather than just asking if the product is gluten-free. Carmel coloring is the prime gluten source in most sodas that are not gluten-free.

Dextrin can be derived from wheat but with the new labeling laws they should tell you. Glucose can also be gluten derived but again the label should note that.

Maltodextrin in the US is always corn unless it says otherwise.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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If you are in North America, neither caramel color nor maltodextrin is a cause for concern. They are made from corn.

Malt must be avoided since it is almost always made from barley which is a source of gluten.

Outside North America, it is possible that caramel color or maltodextrin could be made from wheat. Both of these are highly processed, and so even if the source is from wheat, there is generally no detectable gluten in the ingredient. Since they are a very small component of the finished food, I don't worry about them. However, if you want to take a zero-tolerance position, you may want to investigate the origin of these ingredients if the food containing them is produced in Europe. To me, no detectable gluten in an ingredient comprising a very small fraction of the finished product is just not a cause for worry.

Others may have different views; these are mine.

Carmel coloring is made by heating a starch, and that starch can be a gluten grain starch. Most times it is corn but not always. You do need to check with those. Be aware though that if it tests below a certain level the company can say it is gluten free so it is best to ask where the carmel color comes from rather than just asking if the product is gluten-free. Carmel coloring is the prime gluten source in most sodas that are not gluten-free.

Dextrin can be derived from wheat but with the new labeling laws they should tell you. Glucose can also be gluten derived but again the label should note that.

Maltodextrin in the US is always corn unless it says otherwise.

I ALWAYS check on caramel coloring before eating it!!


Sweetfudge

Born and raised in Portland, OR; Currently living in Provo, UT

Gluten-free since June 2006

Also living with Hypoglycemia since 1991

Dairy-free for good since summer 2008

Started IBS diet and probiotics at GI's recommendation - Fall 2008

Also avoiding: potatoes, beans, crucifers, popcorn, most red meat, coconut milk :(

Started eating a Paleo diet Spring 2011. Love it!

The grass is always greener where you water it.

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I just read this morning a post on another board by a dietician who did some research. Maltodextrin from wheat need not be disclosed in the US if it is a food not covered by the FDA labeling law, that is, food that is regulated instead by the USDA.

Still I don't know if this is a big problem. (Not that I eat anything regulated by the USDA, I don't :lol: ) I don't know how common the wheat maltodextrin is in USDA products or whether it contains enough gluten to be a concern (Europe doesn't think so).

I would be more concerned about it as a potential hidden source of MSG myself.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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I just read this morning a post on another board by a dietician who did some research. Maltodextrin from wheat need not be disclosed in the US if it is a food not covered by the FDA labeling law, that is, food that is regulated instead by the USDA.

USDA, would that mean meats?


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Meat, poultry and egg products. Technically, something could have just a little meat in it and that would be USDA jurisdiction, not FDA. How the jurisdiction is divided up in practice is rather confusing. Researching yesterday, I found a public hearing for a rulemaking where the agencies were trying to rationalize things. From what I could tell, no action has been taken. Anyway, this is an explanation:

http://www.foodsafety.gov/~dms/meattran.html

I found another explanation that 2 to 3 percent meat is enough for USDA jurisdiction. But I think for some items they have deferred to the FDA. It looks like the USDA decides what it wants jurisdiction for; what it doesn't want the FDA gets. I couldn't find a good and simple explanation at all. But finally I stopped because, heck, I'm a vegan so I'm not going to be eating USDA food anyway. Anyone else can research this for themselves if interested ...

It really makes no sense. Meat pizzas are regulated by the USDA. Cheese pizza by the FDA.

I also found that the USDA has said that they are going to issue allergen labelling rules like the FDA has. If I'm reading this correctly, the timetable calls for the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to go out in March of 2008: http://ciir.cs.umass.edu/cgi-bin/ua/web_fe...&doc_id=181


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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Meat, poultry and egg products. Technically, something could have just a little meat in it and that would be USDA jurisdiction, not FDA. How the jurisdiction is divided up in practice is rather confusing. Researching yesterday, I found a public hearing for a rulemaking where the agencies were trying to rationalize things. From what I could tell, no action has been taken. Anyway, this is an explanation:

http://www.foodsafety.gov/~dms/meattran.html

I found another explanation that 2 to 3 percent meat is enough for USDA jurisdiction. But I think for some items they have deferred to the FDA. It looks like the USDA decides what it wants jurisdiction for; what it doesn't want the FDA gets. I couldn't find a good and simple explanation at all. But finally I stopped because, heck, I'm a vegan so I'm not going to be eating USDA food anyway. Anyone else can research this for themselves if interested ...

It really makes no sense. Meat pizzas are regulated by the USDA. Cheese pizza by the FDA.

I also found that the USDA has said that they are going to issue allergen labelling rules like the FDA has. If I'm reading this correctly, the timetable calls for the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to go out in March of 2008: http://ciir.cs.umass.edu/cgi-bin/ua/web_fe...&doc_id=181

Thanks, they do make things sooooo very confusing don't they. I appretiate the links.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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