Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

kay's mommom

Caramel Color/maltodextrin...gluten-free?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Im new on here and I need some help. I just recieved a list of gluten containing foods to avoid in the mail and it says caramel color, malt, and dextrin are some ingredients to avoid. Is maltodextrin also bad for celiac? Also, I have eaten foods saying gluten-free and have checked the ingredients to make sure but some say caramel color. Does anyone know if caramel color contains gluten?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are in North America, neither caramel color nor maltodextrin is a cause for concern. They are made from corn.

Malt must be avoided since it is almost always made from barley which is a source of gluten.

Outside North America, it is possible that caramel color or maltodextrin could be made from wheat. Both of these are highly processed, and so even if the source is from wheat, there is generally no detectable gluten in the ingredient. Since they are a very small component of the finished food, I don't worry about them. However, if you want to take a zero-tolerance position, you may want to investigate the origin of these ingredients if the food containing them is produced in Europe. To me, no detectable gluten in an ingredient comprising a very small fraction of the finished product is just not a cause for worry.

Others may have different views; these are mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it also depends on the level of sensitivity. Also we don't really know where some company might get the caramel coloring they use in ginger ale or something. It has always given me problems when I forget to read a label or someone has changed how they make something. In Hawaii we have this idiotic law saying that as long as a producer adds 51% value to a product it can be called Made in Hawaii. So people bring things in really cheap made in china or Malaysia mark up the price and call it local. It's not and often contains items that celiacs need to stay away from.

I'm extremely sensitive to any amount of gluten which for the past two years my body does not let me forget.

Ken

If you are in North America, neither caramel color nor maltodextrin is a cause for concern. They are made from corn.

Malt must be avoided since it is almost always made from barley which is a source of gluten.

Outside North America, it is possible that caramel color or maltodextrin could be made from wheat. Both of these are highly processed, and so even if the source is from wheat, there is generally no detectable gluten in the ingredient. Since they are a very small component of the finished food, I don't worry about them. However, if you want to take a zero-tolerance position, you may want to investigate the origin of these ingredients if the food containing them is produced in Europe. To me, no detectable gluten in an ingredient comprising a very small fraction of the finished product is just not a cause for worry.

Others may have different views; these are mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carmel coloring is made by heating a starch, and that starch can be a gluten grain starch. Most times it is corn but not always. You do need to check with those. Be aware though that if it tests below a certain level the company can say it is gluten free so it is best to ask where the carmel color comes from rather than just asking if the product is gluten-free. Carmel coloring is the prime gluten source in most sodas that are not gluten-free.

Dextrin can be derived from wheat but with the new labeling laws they should tell you. Glucose can also be gluten derived but again the label should note that.

Maltodextrin in the US is always corn unless it says otherwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you are in North America, neither caramel color nor maltodextrin is a cause for concern. They are made from corn.

Malt must be avoided since it is almost always made from barley which is a source of gluten.

Outside North America, it is possible that caramel color or maltodextrin could be made from wheat. Both of these are highly processed, and so even if the source is from wheat, there is generally no detectable gluten in the ingredient. Since they are a very small component of the finished food, I don't worry about them. However, if you want to take a zero-tolerance position, you may want to investigate the origin of these ingredients if the food containing them is produced in Europe. To me, no detectable gluten in an ingredient comprising a very small fraction of the finished product is just not a cause for worry.

Others may have different views; these are mine.

Carmel coloring is made by heating a starch, and that starch can be a gluten grain starch. Most times it is corn but not always. You do need to check with those. Be aware though that if it tests below a certain level the company can say it is gluten free so it is best to ask where the carmel color comes from rather than just asking if the product is gluten-free. Carmel coloring is the prime gluten source in most sodas that are not gluten-free.

Dextrin can be derived from wheat but with the new labeling laws they should tell you. Glucose can also be gluten derived but again the label should note that.

Maltodextrin in the US is always corn unless it says otherwise.

I ALWAYS check on caramel coloring before eating it!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read this morning a post on another board by a dietician who did some research. Maltodextrin from wheat need not be disclosed in the US if it is a food not covered by the FDA labeling law, that is, food that is regulated instead by the USDA.

Still I don't know if this is a big problem. (Not that I eat anything regulated by the USDA, I don't :lol: ) I don't know how common the wheat maltodextrin is in USDA products or whether it contains enough gluten to be a concern (Europe doesn't think so).

I would be more concerned about it as a potential hidden source of MSG myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just read this morning a post on another board by a dietician who did some research. Maltodextrin from wheat need not be disclosed in the US if it is a food not covered by the FDA labeling law, that is, food that is regulated instead by the USDA.

USDA, would that mean meats?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meat, poultry and egg products. Technically, something could have just a little meat in it and that would be USDA jurisdiction, not FDA. How the jurisdiction is divided up in practice is rather confusing. Researching yesterday, I found a public hearing for a rulemaking where the agencies were trying to rationalize things. From what I could tell, no action has been taken. Anyway, this is an explanation:

http://www.foodsafety.gov/~dms/meattran.html

I found another explanation that 2 to 3 percent meat is enough for USDA jurisdiction. But I think for some items they have deferred to the FDA. It looks like the USDA decides what it wants jurisdiction for; what it doesn't want the FDA gets. I couldn't find a good and simple explanation at all. But finally I stopped because, heck, I'm a vegan so I'm not going to be eating USDA food anyway. Anyone else can research this for themselves if interested ...

It really makes no sense. Meat pizzas are regulated by the USDA. Cheese pizza by the FDA.

I also found that the USDA has said that they are going to issue allergen labelling rules like the FDA has. If I'm reading this correctly, the timetable calls for the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to go out in March of 2008: http://ciir.cs.umass.edu/cgi-bin/ua/web_fe...&doc_id=181

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Meat, poultry and egg products. Technically, something could have just a little meat in it and that would be USDA jurisdiction, not FDA. How the jurisdiction is divided up in practice is rather confusing. Researching yesterday, I found a public hearing for a rulemaking where the agencies were trying to rationalize things. From what I could tell, no action has been taken. Anyway, this is an explanation:

http://www.foodsafety.gov/~dms/meattran.html

I found another explanation that 2 to 3 percent meat is enough for USDA jurisdiction. But I think for some items they have deferred to the FDA. It looks like the USDA decides what it wants jurisdiction for; what it doesn't want the FDA gets. I couldn't find a good and simple explanation at all. But finally I stopped because, heck, I'm a vegan so I'm not going to be eating USDA food anyway. Anyone else can research this for themselves if interested ...

It really makes no sense. Meat pizzas are regulated by the USDA. Cheese pizza by the FDA.

I also found that the USDA has said that they are going to issue allergen labelling rules like the FDA has. If I'm reading this correctly, the timetable calls for the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to go out in March of 2008: http://ciir.cs.umass.edu/cgi-bin/ua/web_fe...&doc_id=181

Thanks, they do make things sooooo very confusing don't they. I appretiate the links.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • March 20, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
      0  
      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
What are your iron results?  Was ferritin (iron stores) taken?  Are you actually anemic (low hemoglobin)?  The results you posted are your Immunoglobulins.  Looks like your IgE is high, but then it is Spring and allergy season is supposed to be pretty bad this year (at least in the US).  What riggers your allergies (e.g. cats, horses, mold, etc.)? Have other autoimmune issues been ruled out that could cause tendinitis or vertigo?    
  • Blog Entries

  • ×
    ×
    • Create New...