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bakingbarb

I Don't Like The Breads Yet

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I think Alton Brown did something like that on one of his shows. When the batter is thick and pasty like that, I have found that if I add extra liquid, it turns out just fine and is easier to work with, at least, for that focaccia-type flaxmeal skillet bread and for pancakes.

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Sulfites are used to process modified food starches as well as some corn starches or potato starches. Unless the starch is heat processed or "Physically treated" it will contain a significant dose of sulfites and or modifying chemicals which many people are sensitive or allergic to. And heat treated starch will not be labelled as modified. Modified denotes a chemical process. Unless the product is labeled organic, it's a good bet the starch in it was chemically modified. If you're allergic like I am to sulfites, you gotta know what they hide in.

Someone correct me if I'm mistaken, but it's not "chemically modified" per se, in the sense of adding chemicals to it to change it. It's "modified" by an application of heat and/or pressure. Usually it's done to change the viscosity and physical properties. This allows it to be used in a wider variety of applications. By no means does it turn it into a poison. It just makes it thicker and stickier.

Thousands of foods are "modified" in many ways. It's not neccessarily always a bad thing. Many times it's to improve foods. Milk, has to be homoginized and pasturized. Again, that's applying heat and/or pressure to make it safe.

Seems some of us get so hung-up about so-called chemicals. Yes, certainly there are chemicals that are suspect. Some people have intolerances for the preservatives nitrites/sulfites for instance. But most people don't. All of us Celiacs have an intolerance for wheat. Wheat's not a chemical. Salt's a chemical, and it's in everything. Like everything else in life, we have to use our brains to figure things out. The use of chemicals is not a black & white thing. :)

best regards, lm

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I read that soda water was supposed to help. I couldn't see that it made one bit of difference when I tried it in bread. I'm starting to think flour and flour mixes are what make the biggest difference. I've started trying every gluten free flour I can get my hands on. The experiments are ongoing, LOL.

Has anyone ever tried adding soda/cola to their bread/muffin recipes? It was a tip in one of my books that is supposed to help make the recipe turn out lighter?

I made dumplings the other night and they were like raw thick dough balls in the middle, ick! But I didn't use the exact flour mix that was stated in the recipe. I'm beginning to think that does really make a difference.

I though maybe club soda or seltzer water might work since I wouldn't want the added sugar.

Anyone tried it or heard of it???

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I saw the soda water tip too (I think in reading the ingredients in the bread from some fancy on-line dleivery bakery). But I question it highly because if you also beat the heck out of the dough, the recommended 3-5 minutes that is often stated in recipes, what could possibly be left of that carbonation? I think more realistically, you could get a little more air in by 1. beating the heck out of the dough 2. perhaps adding just a dash of baking powder 3. making sure those lovely little yeasties have something good to eat (my preferance is agave, but honey or sugar are fine too) and a nice warm little spot to work their flatulatory magic.

I definitely notice a slight difference in my bread's texture with my new mixer. It is very powerful and the loaves are coming out with just a slightly finer texture and a little lighter color. It killed my cookies however, so have to rethink that one.

Anyway, I can't overstate this enough - it is totally doable! Still don't know how to post a dang picture otherwise I'd show you the proof (so to speak - good baking joke :lol: ). Keep working on it!

The other barb (I am starting to feel like the other white meat!)

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I only liked Pamela's Wheat free bread mix when I added a lot of ground flax seed to it. ( and sometimes sunflower seeds, also ). Like you, I don't care for the texture or taste of the breads. I used to bake my own wheat bread and as far as I'm concerned nothing gluten free can ever taste that good ! ! :D

I don't use the xanthan gum in anything I bake from scratch like muffins, cornbreads, etc.

I used to add the ground flax seed to everything just to give it some more texture and body. But I'm afraid the flax seed is bothering me now. I'm testing it out------ Drat ! I hope I don't have to give it up--- I really like it. ! :angry:

So if you don't use xanthan gum, what do you use? Or do you just bake without it?

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I was diagnosed with Celiac last year. It has taken me a whole year to finally start liking the taste of the gluten free breads. I tried eveything and baked so many kinds of breads, but I hated everything! Now my taste has finally started to change, and I am finding some of the things I hated, don't taste too bad now. Maybe it takes time for your body to forget how wheat tastes. Once you do, then the new stuff doesn't taste too bad.

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Six years later and I basically never eat the breads. I can't stand them. And to me they're definitely NOT worth the cost.

richard

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There is actually one recipe I've liked for ciabatta. It's in the 125 Best Gluten-Free Recipes book. It can actually hold together for a sandwich without toasting and while it doesn't exactly taste like "real" bread, the smell is close. Worth the low price of the book for this one recipe, IMO.

richard

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There is actually one recipe I've liked for ciabatta. It's in the 125 Best Gluten-Free Recipes book. It can actually hold together for a sandwich without toasting and while it doesn't exactly taste like "real" bread, the smell is close. Worth the low price of the book for this one recipe, IMO.

richard

Is it similar to the flaxmeal skillet bread recipe on page 1 of this thread? And who is the author of 125 Best Gluten-Free Recipes?

That flaxmeal skillet bread really DOES taste like "real" bread, as evidenced by the gluten-eaters in my family, who say they like it better than store-bought "real" bread and scarf it down as quickly as I can make it! #2 Son says he doesn't mind at all going gluten-free as long as he gets to have that bread.

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I think that, for me, the reason the bread mixes are so terrible is because almost all of them use bean flour, which I can't stand. It tastes like someone mixed bean sprouts into the bread. <_<

We don't do bread very often, but when we do, we make Laurie's flax bread (substituting sorghum for the garfava flour). It is excellent, holds up well and has good texture. Had grilled cheese sandwiches with it the other day and they were great.

http://www.recipezaar.com/190906

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The authors are Donna Washburn and Heather Butt. Book is about $11.50 at Amazon.

I believe it is somewhat like that recipe. though no flaxmeal. You make a round loaf.

richard

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There is actually one recipe I've liked for ciabatta. It's in the 125 Best Gluten-Free Recipes book. It can actually hold together for a sandwich without toasting and while it doesn't exactly taste like "real" bread, the smell is close. Worth the low price of the book for this one recipe, IMO.

richard

I have one of their books and am going to look for the recipe. I also plan on making that flax bread everyone keeps talking about although I am a bit concerned about the flax in the diet.

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I have one of their books and am going to look for the recipe. I also plan on making that flax bread everyone keeps talking about although I am a bit concerned about the flax in the diet.

How come? (Just curious.)

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i love flax!! i put it in everything - cookies, breads, tortillas, pancakes, yogurt. I'll try to sneak it into anything. My kids are actually worried when they don't see little flecks in their food :D .

It is excellent on omega 3 and good fiber. It can be used as both an egg and an oil sub in baking and makes baked goods have a wonderful rich flavor. Not bad for something that's healhty? What's the worry? Have you had a reaction to it?

I suppose if you are not used to it it could be rough on digestion (I don't know that for sure!) but I've been a vergetarian for 20+ years so my digestion is used to "rough".

T.O. Barb

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I also love the ground flax seed in recipes. Haven't tried the flax bread recipe yet either, but it's on my list.

I'm finding I like the more textured gluten free stuff. I never ate white bread before and loved the whole wheat in foods and that seems to be carrying over to my gluten free baked goods.

I made pancakes this morning and they had corn meal in them, which to me made them taste really good and gave them a fluffier texture. I can't stand the heavy doughs.

The only thing I wouldn't like textured is cupcakes or cake. That just has to be melt in your smooth, lol.

Just curious, is anyone else totally enjoying trying out new recipes? I'm really likeing baking and it surprises me because I never did it before and really disliked it. Now even my children are having a great time 'judging' the foods I make. It's like a game to them, lol. We all have to taste something at the exact same time and then take turns rating it. They even make suggestions for modifications I should try. Goofy, I know but it's keeping it interesting!

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I just buy everything. This way I know that what I'm getting has already turned out and I don't have to worry about accidently putting a little too much of something or not enough. The only things I do bake is basically cakes/cookies/muffins that kind of stuff. Even though buying from a store is so much more pricy, I also find them more convenient and yummy. (both for breads and pastas). But it is up to you, I guess. Being a student doesn't exactly leave a whole pile of time to cook.

~ Lisa ~

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So if you don't use xanthan gum, what do you use? Or do you just bake without it?

I just bake without it and the muffins turn out fine. I take a regular recipe for muffins or cornbread , then sub the gluten-free flour--- Have never bought any xanthan gum and haven't needed it yet. However, I have not tried to bake gluten free cakes and cookies . Might need it for that ?????? Don't know. :)

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. Being a student doesn't exactly leave a whole pile of time to cook.

~ Lisa ~

That's what I thought when I was a student a million years ago. Now, as a mom of 3 with a full-time job, I find myself wondering how I ever could have thought myself busy as a student.

They should make a reality cooking show about a mom making dinner (gluten-free, of course--everything from scratch, even the bread!) with a baby on her hip while helping two other children with homework, giving a diabetic cat insulin, and cleaning cat barf off the floor!

Of course, my sister-in-law has me beat--she went back to school while working full-time and raising 3 kids. :blink:

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I thought the flax could be a little rough on the digestion, I have problems with the big D sometimes still. Although doesn't fiber work in the reverse, it evens out that issue?

I love baking, everything but the bread so far. I won't be baking this bread until Saturday or Sunday.

So far everything turns out great, but I have always LOVED baking. Still think about a caf

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