Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

sandpiper

The Safety Of Eating Gluten Free Barley

Recommended Posts

Hi to all,

I would like to ask if anyone here has tried the gluten free products that are made of barley? I understand that if the barley is harvested before it reaches a certain level that it does not contain gluten. Does anyone have more information on this and if so, if you have tried eating barley that is gluten free if there was any kind of reaction from it? Would this fall into the same trial and error of dedicated oats that are starting to come into the mainstream and not being a problem for some of us? How many of you have tried the oats?

I will tell you that I myself have not tried eating any gluten-free barley, but we have a sister who has been following the Hallelujah diet and she is having alot of problems with the D word. She also was dx with small bowel adenocarcinoma cancer last year. I have tried to encourage her to get tested for celiac, for a feel that she could strongly be a celiac/gluten intolerant.

Please let me know what you all think about this. For me this is always a learning disease, I felt like my head had been buried in the sand not knowing about the gluten free barley, ( which puts me at an uneasy feeling of just thinking about eating some).

Thanks to all,

Susie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


I haven't heard of this, but I can tell you I wouldn't try it. This is like the wheat starch in the UK- it's still gonna have a bit of gluten. I also know that I react to barley worst of all. So this is a no for me.

I have, however, tried the oats. Those are different- oats do not contain gluten. The reason that we can't eat quaker oats or w/e is because they are often grown in the same field as wheat, harvested on the same equiptment, etc. My stomach didn't love the oats (I'm probably not healed enough to have that much grain protein, and avenin (the oat protein) is similar to gluten)

Good luck with your sister.


Gluten Free since 10/07

Mildly Lactose Intolerant, slight intestinal symptoms after eating milk products, but easily corrected with lactase enzyme

Endometriosis- DX'd 5/07

Gluten Antibodies- "negative"...don't know exact numbers, am highly suspicious...

DXed celiac 12-19-07 via genetics/elimination diet- DQ2 allele

Brother with Celiac, aspergers...his tests were all negative (he didn't have genetics done), including endoscopy, but he definitely is at the least gluten intolerant...highly suspect my mother has it as well- she has hyperthyroid, fibromyalgia, hemochromatosis, and now colon cancer, and she has been weak and exhausted and just generally sick. She's going to get tested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

There is no such thing as gluten free barley as far as I know or have heard. Are you thinking of stuff like the cookies that say wheat free on the label but contain a warning that they have barley? I have never heard of any company stating that a barley product is gluten free, wheat free yes. Even small amounts of barley, such as in cereals, is enough to make us sick. It can be also be hidden in natural flavors and not is not required to be disclosed on labels so IMHO it is one of the most dangerous forms of gluten for us.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I would like to ask if anyone here has tried the gluten free products that are made of barley? I understand that if the barley is harvested before it reaches a certain level that it does not contain gluten. Does anyone have more information on this and if so, if you have tried eating barley that is gluten free if there was any kind of reaction from it? Would this fall into the same trial and error of dedicated oats that are starting to come into the mainstream and not being a problem for some of us? How many of you have tried the oats?

I have never seen any barley product that claimed to be gluten free. Any chance you have a brand name or what the product is? I myself would be extremely dubious of any product or person who claimed that they made barley gluten free by harvesting it at a certain time.

Oats contain the protein avenin, which is technically different from the gluten in wheat, barley and rye. Gluten is a general term that means protein storage. It is gliadin in wheat, horedin in barley, and secalin in rye. Avenin in oats causes some celiacs problems, but not all. There is a small subset of celiacs that cannot tolerate oats in any form, gluten-free or not.

I have tried the gluten-free oats from Gifts of Nature, Bob's Red Mill and Gluten Free Oats. All were quite good. I seem to be able to tolerate them quite well. My son, however, cannot. Because of this fact, I don't eat them very much. But they are a nice luxury sometimes, if one can tolerate them.


-Colleen

Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)

13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy

Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter



Join eNewsletter