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miasmom

Question About Breastfeeding And Honey

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I am 39 weeks pregnant and I am going to breastfeed. In the breastfeeding class that I recently took, the lactation consultant said that honey is a no-no for the breastfeeding mom. My question is, does that include cooked honey or honey used in recipes (ie bread)? I just got a bread machine and made my first loaf of gluten-free bread- which was AMAZING. All the recipes that I have include honey. So if anyone knows if the baking of the bread kills the botulism spores, could you let me know.

Thanks, Amy

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I don't understand why the breastfeeding mom would be proscribed from eating honey - the botulism spores would be broken down by your (the mom's) digestive system. But I'm not a mom...


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I've never heard that the mom shouldn't eat honey, only babies under 1 year should not eat it. I would check with another lactation consultant to confirm. I ate honey when I was nursing my son all the time.


Marcia-

Diagnosed Celiac based on equivocal results on blood seriology tests, did not have a biopsy due to already eating gluten free (I didn't know any better at the time to keep eating gluten until all tests could be done).

Diagnosis came 3 months after the birth of my first child at age 31 (I believe childbirth was my trigger).

Gluten Free since 8/06

Genetic testing revealed:

I have one copy of DQ2 (DQA1 05/DQB1 02)

Son- 3 years old, so far not showing any signs of digestive issues and does eat gluten- fingers crossed!

Second baby born after I have been gluten free for 2 1/2 years- a healthy boy weighing in at 9 pounds at birth!

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I have never heard this either and I have a Phd in Holistic Nutrition.

Now some might read that putting raw honey on sore nipples can ease the pain and help them heal faster. So dont do this and then let the baby nurse. This is just common sense though.

I found letting my nipples get air everyday helped with the soreness that you get in the first few weeks. Just walked around the house topless for 2 weeks.....LOL Hubby didnt mind. ;)


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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I've also heard of not giving infants honey directly due to the high risk of botulism.

One website (medline) recommended breastfeeding to prevent botulism. I am making the assumption that this means as long as mom is not sick. While I'm not entirely familiar with breastfeeding, I do believe bacteria can pass through milk.

The articles I read say that the bacteria itself is not heat-resistant, so cooking the honey will greatly reduce your chance of food poisoning. However, the spores are extremely heat resistant so cooking does not affect them; if they are present food poisoning is inevitable. Spores are most commonly found in home-canned foods.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FS104

Practical advice - it's a risk albeit a small one.


Celiac Disease 2007

Spinal Fusion 2006

Grave's Disease 2000

There is a way around every obstacle.

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All I know is that I am happy to see this post. After reading things that are not on here(on other sites) and watching this powerpoint I thought I'd never be able to have kids as a celiac(when I'm older of course)!! Very encouraging. :D

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I've also heard of not giving infants honey directly due to the high risk of botulism.

One website (medline) recommended breastfeeding to prevent botulism. I am making the assumption that this means as long as mom is not sick. While I'm not entirely familiar with breastfeeding, I do believe bacteria can pass through milk.

Actually, even if mom is sick, she should still breastfeed if possible, as she will be making antibodies to whatever made her sick, and those antibodies go directly into the milk to protect the baby.

If mom is sick, then NOT breastfeeding is, from the baby's perspective, the worst thing that can happen. THen baby is suddenly NOT getting antibodies--and is much more likely to get sick, either from mom, or from whatever germs whoever is feeding him is breathing on him.

I had intestinal viruses, flu twice, bronchitis twice, and even pleurisy--and on the advice of the lactation consultant and the pediatrician, I continued to nurse--and the baby NEVER caught anything from me.

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Actually, even if mom is sick, she should still breastfeed if possible, as she will be making antibodies to whatever made her sick, and those antibodies go directly into the milk to protect the baby.

If mom is sick, then NOT breastfeeding is, from the baby's perspective, the worst thing that can happen. THen baby is suddenly NOT getting antibodies--and is much more likely to get sick, either from mom, or from whatever germs whoever is feeding him is breathing on him.

I had intestinal viruses, flu twice, bronchitis twice, and even pleurisy--and on the advice of the lactation consultant and the pediatrician, I continued to nurse--and the baby NEVER caught anything from me.

Makes sense. I'll remember this, thank you. :)


Celiac Disease 2007

Spinal Fusion 2006

Grave's Disease 2000

There is a way around every obstacle.

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What about subbing it with maple syrup or agave nectar in your bread recipe?

Sticky and sweet just like that new baby is gonna be :wub:


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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From KellyMom- a site I really trust!!!!

Can a nursing mother eat honey?

Honey is not a problem for mom to eat. The gut flora of adults and children over a year old are able to fend off the botulism spores that may be present in honey, and render them harmless. Since the spores would be killed in your gastrointestinal tract, they would not make it into your bloodstream and therefore cannot be present in your milk.

A baby's gut can't defend itself against the botulism spores, and so they can colonize the intestinal tract, germinate and release botulinum neurotoxin. As a result, honey is not recommended for babies under a year old. It's recommended that you avoid giving baby anything that contains honey, or make sure that the cooking process kills any botulism spores that might be present. To kill botulism spores, the food must be cooked at 240 degrees Fahrenheit (this requires a pressure cooker) for at least 15 minutes. Botulism spores are very heat resistant - it takes more than six hours of boiling at 212 degrees Fahrenheit to kill the spores. The toxin is less resistant - boiling foods (at 212 degrees Fahrenheit) for 10 minutes will destroy the toxin.

http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/mom/mom-foods.html#honey


DH positive skin biopsy June 2007

Blood test positive July 2007

Gluten Free- since 6-23-07

Vegetarian since 1991

Stay-at-home Mommy to:

Kellen 2-05

Cameron 10-06

Scarlett 5-09

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