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Maso

Attension Deficit Disorder And Celiac...?

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Does anybody here have any personal experience with Adult Attension Deficit Disorder and glutin sensitivity...???

I'm trying to solve my Adult ADD here... and I had some bad Celiac symptoms as a kid ( you don't want to know... ) that I "thought" I had outgrown...

Will a Glutin free diet solve ADD...???

I'm reading the book: Dangerous Grains, by James Braly, M.D. and Ron Hoggan, M.A.

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YES!!!!!

You will probably find that the longer you are gluten-free, the better it gets. You may also want to try some of the following ideas. They have worked in our family.

Keep a pot of coffee handy. The caffeine helps to get the sluggish part of the brain going properly.

Eat high quality proteins regularly. You may want to find a good protein drink and keep it handy. It will help keep your blood sugar level and that really effects the ADHD. Avoid simple carbohydrates such as white rice and potatoes unless you offset them with a load of protein.

Steer clear of dairy and any other potential allergens until your system is clear. Gradually add them back one at a time. You will probably find that some tend to trigger the problem more readily than others.

Avoid artificial sweeteners, colors, and flavors as they tend to trigger the symptoms of ADHD.

Plan your life so that you do not get surprised and wind up with that overwhelmed and panicked feeling as though you and everything around you are out of control.

Control what you can. Let the rest slide off your back as best you can.

Check you job...does it fit your ADHD personality or fight it. My oldest son changed jobs a couple of years back and found that he was going crazy. His prior job had him doing what he does best...handling 10 things at once and moving from one thing to another in rapid succession. The new one required him to be in one place performing relatively simple tasks for several hours. Needless to say, he went back to the first one and is much happier. He has since been promoted into management. The ADHD worked in his favor in that fast-paced environment.

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Guest ajlauer

:lol: I just asked - just about the same question - in the board for parents of celiac kids. Just a few comments:

If you're looking for a coffepot that makes more than 12 cups, we got a 40-cup coffee URN at "Staples". I looked everywhere at Walmart, Kmart,etc... to no avail. Never would have guessed to check an office-supply store!!! Oh, and the urn was only $40!! That's cheaper than most regular coffeepots!

CDFord, after reading your reply... I can't help but wonder if my husband has ADHD. *laugh* He worked in self-employment, at home, for 6 months and went nuts!!!! He's very happy at his busy busy busy job. Hmm... he's the reason for the coffee urn too. IF you poke him, he bleeds coffee. It's all making sense now... They need an icon of a face with the lightbulb above the head. *laugh*

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This sounds good...

Anybody else...?

-Maso

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Guest nini

I def. think that the gluten-free diet would help add/adhd, there are quite a few articles out there about this very subject... My family was convinced that I had ADD, I saw it as "foggy head" and I would zone out and not be able to respond to people when they spoke to me right away. I could hear them, but it would take a tremendous amount of effort to come back from that "zone" before I could respond. Since I have been gluten-free I haven't had any of the foggy head.

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That "foggy head" got me put into special ed classes in school. <_< I definitly think there is a very strong link to food allergies and ADD/ADHD and many learning disabilities. It would be like an out of body experience. I could see and hear what was going on around me but just could not connect with the real world. Frightening to think that I lived that way for 36 years.

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"Foggy Head"...is right...!!!

I have described my ADD condition as being like having a "Head full of fog" many times.

I have stopped eating anything that I know has any wheat product in it for about a month, with very little "cheating"... and I seem to be better... but I gather from what has been said here and also by Ron Hoggan ( go see his Master's Thesis about this at: THIS ( Click on it... )) that it will take time.

I'm both delighted and very interested in responces like these from you...keep them comming...please.

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I used to "zone out" and had a terrible time with things like remembering peoples names or directions. I would forget both the moment I heard them. Now my concentration is vastly improved and I'm not so "linear". I can do multiple tasks simultaneously and remember all the details.

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:lol:  I just asked - just about the same question - in the board for parents of celiac kids.

Attn: ajlauer

I'd like to read that posting of your's... Please give me a link to it...

Thanx...

Foggy Maso

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Guest ajlauer

The Link

Well, hopefully that works. I haven't posted a link on these boards before. It ended with an = sign, and that just doesn't seem right! Hmm.. if you do a search for "Focalin", that should bring it up. Or "ADHD". I've had one reply so far, and its pretty good. Hope you can get to it! *hugs*

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<_< i have a son with ADD--he is now 23 and i can see the pattern still effecting his life too--i used to blame his ADD on his father, but now i realize that people with ADD are usually quite intelligient--they normally just cant pull their thoughts together--he does very well with on-hands things--book work has always been difficult for him---and as i age, i realize that his ADD is probably something i shared with him---i have always been very organized and used to complain if things were not put back in their place and i now realize that is how i keep order--that is how i can find things--if out of place, then i am lost--you cant move things on me, you cant spell words to me all at once--only 2 or 3 letters at a time---i get the brain fog too--you cant say something to me when i am trying to make a point, or i lose the whole thought track---i am not what you would call hyper, but i cant sit still--more and more makes sense to me now-----deb

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Guest BellyTimber

Deb -

Now I understand you!

It was your remark about spelling!

I am to some extent like all the people this thread is about, but I'm very interested in etymology - how words derive from words in older languages. I love history also.

There is scarce a word I come across, think about, say or write without having flash through my mind: nomads on steppes, Anglo-Saxons in huts with straw roofs (like we made in craft lesson at age 9), Romans with forums and togas, etc etc!

Anyway that's something that helped me with spellings from an early age, before I knew how or why it was helping me...

It's nowadays thought King Alfred the Great had Crohn's - no wonder he didn't care for cakes ...

:lol:

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Guest BellyTimber

Maso,

Did you know Mr Hoggan or did a search turn it up?

That's a phenomenal document, thanks so much for bringing it to our "attention".

It includes some powerful testimonies as appendices.

Particularly the conclusions and testimonies are rich in good sentences I shall quote to doctors and also to friends facing these things!

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Maso,

Did you know Mr Hoggan or did a search turn it up?

I found Ron Hoggan through a Google search, and I have communicated with him regularly through the e-mail. He's in Alberta, Canada and I'm here in Miami. He was very helpfull and willing to answer questions. But my best suggestion about that is to spend $10.00 through WalMart for his excellent book, Dangerous Grains... just go to: http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp...duct_id=1754223" target="external ugc nofollow">WalMart Web Site ( Click this... )

Attn: darlindeb25

Deal with that kid's ADD... You don't want him to end up like me with a part time job pushing a broom for 28 years...!!! :(

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To Maso: I thank you also for the Hogan thesis link. That was exactly the piece of literature my husband was needing to find to help him think through his ADD. We are also getting the book. Thank you. Valerie

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The Hoggan Thesis link seems to be going over big in here and maybe the book will too.

Be sure to check back to this thread when you have comments about those after reading. This could turn out to be a long one...eh...?!

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