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KK555

New To All This And Needing Help

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Hey everyone,

We have just put our 2 year old on a gluten diet. He has had issues since he was a baby. He had to have soy formula and has been on soy milk since he was one. He gets skin rashes and has malabsorption problems (and boy do his poops stink). Due to lack of funds we are not able to have a biopsy done (which his GI wanted) so we have put him on a gluten free diet to see if his symptoms improve. However, it sure is not easy grocery shopping. I can read the labels for wheat, rye, barley and gluten but I am so afraid I will miss something that is mixed together in those crazy ingredient names. How do I know what has what without calling someone 24hrs a day. I know there are gluten free products out there but they tend to be expensive and we are a family on a budget. Anyone have any key things to look out for? Or safe products to buy? I read we need to stay away from Canola oil, vinegar, modified food starch. Seems these things are in all the "normal" food. What about butter, mayo, mustard, ice cream and such? Any help I could get would be great. Thanks!!

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Hey everyone,

We have just put our 2 year old on a gluten diet. He has had issues since he was a baby. He had to have soy formula and has been on soy milk since he was one. He gets skin rashes and has malabsorption problems (and boy do his poops stink). Due to lack of funds we are not able to have a biopsy done (which his GI wanted) so we have put him on a gluten free diet to see if his symptoms improve. However, it sure is not easy grocery shopping. I can read the labels for wheat, rye, barley and gluten but I am so afraid I will miss something that is mixed together in those crazy ingredient names. How do I know what has what without calling someone 24hrs a day. I know there are gluten free products out there but they tend to be expensive and we are a family on a budget. Anyone have any key things to look out for? Or safe products to buy? I read we need to stay away from Canola oil, vinegar, modified food starch. Seems these things are in all the "normal" food. What about butter, mayo, mustard, ice cream and such? Any help I could get would be great. Thanks!!

Hi KK,

You didn't list what country you live in, so you might want to mention that since that will affect certain answers you get. Distilled vinegar is ok. That is the first I've heard about Canola oil though. Modified food starch can be questionable. Ice cream, and mustard are also questionable. There are several safe food and ingredient lists, but this one might be especially helpful for you: Children's Hospital of Boston Celiac Information.There are several very informative pages there, including safe and unsafe ingredient lists. One thing that they mention though is Oats. While oats are still somewhat debated, if you can find certified gluten free oats produced from a dedicated grower, they should be ok. I'm super-sensitive, and I have been ok with them. Also try to avoid anything with cottonseed oil (my personal recommendation) since no part of the cotton plant is human edible, and cottonseed oil is so highly refined in order to make it non-poisonous that it can be quite upsetting for some people.

We too are on a budget, but we've had to adjust things accordingly and make some cutbacks in other areas since I was diagnosed back in April. It hasn't been fun or easy, especially since I'm allergic to soy and dairy intolerant as well. But it has been worth it since our medical bills are starting to decrease as my health improves, and I'm feeling and doing better in some areas than I have in years.

You may need/want to consider switching out his soy for some other types of milk (goat, almond, cashew, rice) since you can develop additional intolerances to foods if that is all you are eating, especially if your system is already unhappy.

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Canola oil is gluten-free, as is butter. Here is some more information that will help with label reading in mainstream foods:

Unsafe ingredients: http://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsaf...ents/Page1.html

Safe ingredients: http://www.celiac.com/articles/181/1/Safe-...ents/Page1.html

A list of companies that has a clear gluten policy. If you don't see "wheat, rye, barley, barley malt, oats" on the labels, its not there, or hidden in "flavors, starches, etc." http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/foodlists/index.htm This makes shopping MUCH easier.

FDA foods are required to list wheat - it cannot be hidden.

Rule #1: Never eat anything without reading the label first.

Rule #2: Consistently check labels, even of your favorite products, as product formulations can change.

Rule #3: If you are unsure of an ingredient, or the company's policy on labeling, call the phone number on the back of the product or email the company.

Hope this helps.

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There are also gluten free grocery shopping guides out there to make your life WAY easier at the store. I'm talking about your regular grocery store, and mainstream grocery lines (Heinz, Hormel, Progresso, on and on).

Gluten-Free Grocery Shopping Guides

http://www.ceceliasmarketplace.com/

http://www.triumphdining.com/?gclid=COPJ4f...CFdVL5QodHR95Bw

There another out that can also be downloaded to your PDA device, etc., by Clan Thompson.

I bought the Cecilas guide, it was about $25 and worth every dollar. Put an end to standing in the aisle and reading packages!

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Hi KK,

You didn't list what country you live in, so you might want to mention that since that will affect certain answers you get. Distilled vinegar is ok. That is the first I've heard about Canola oil though. Modified food starch can be questionable. Ice cream, and mustard are also questionable. There are several safe food and ingredient lists, but this one might be especially helpful for you: Children's Hospital of Boston Celiac Information.There are several very informative pages there, including safe and unsafe ingredient lists. One thing that they mention though is Oats. While oats are still somewhat debated, if you can find certified gluten free oats produced from a dedicated grower, they should be ok. I'm super-sensitive, and I have been ok with them. Also try to avoid anything with cottonseed oil (my personal recommendation) since no part of the cotton plant is human edible, and cottonseed oil is so highly refined in order to make it non-poisonous that it can be quite upsetting for some people.

We too are on a budget, but we've had to adjust things accordingly and make some cutbacks in other areas since I was diagnosed back in April. It hasn't been fun or easy, especially since I'm allergic to soy and dairy intolerant as well. But it has been worth it since our medical bills are starting to decrease as my health improves, and I'm feeling and doing better in some areas than I have in years.

You may need/want to consider switching out his soy for some other types of milk (goat, almond, cashew, rice) since you can develop additional intolerances to foods if that is all you are eating, especially if your system is already unhappy.

Thanks for the info. I live in the US, Texas. I was talking to someone today that was telling me I need to buy separate dishes (pots, pans, bowls, plates ect) because plastic can absorb the gluten. Is this true, is it really that important?? Thanks for the website. I am ready to start the ongoing process of gluten free. Just hope I can keep him away from other kids snacks. He stole another kids goldfish snacks today and he ate them before the teacher could get to him. He is having some trouble adjusting.

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Canola oil is gluten-free, as is butter. Here is some more information that will help with label reading in mainstream foods:

Thanks tons!!!! :D

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There are also gluten free grocery shopping guides out there to make your life WAY easier at the store. I'm talking about your regular grocery store, and mainstream grocery lines (Heinz, Hormel, Progresso, on and on).

Gluten-Free Grocery Shopping Guides

http://www.ceceliasmarketplace.com/

http://www.triumphdining.com/?gclid=COPJ4f...CFdVL5QodHR95Bw

There another out that can also be downloaded to your PDA device, etc., by Clan Thompson.

I bought the Cecilas guide, it was about $25 and worth every dollar. Put an end to standing in the aisle and reading packages!

Thanks, reading labels can be a chore, and in the grocery store is the worst. I will look into the Celiacs guide.

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I'm not aware of gluten being absorbed by plastic but the rest of the advice is good. If you have glass or stainless steel cookware, a really good scrubbing should do the trick. But any nonstick cookware that is well scratched, should probably not be used for his food. It just might be easier to designate a pan or two for his food use only. He needs his own toaster, you just cannot clean those well enough. If you use a colander for pasta, he should probably have a newone just for him.

You don't have to spend a fortune on alternate foods for him. You can buy gluten-free pasta for him at Walmart and it isn't very expensive. For bread, I just substitute corn tortillas, I imagine those are cheap in TX just like they are here in IN. Other than that, his special milk and regular meats and cheeses, fruits and vegetables. What else does he need besides that? If he needs other treats, they're really much cheaper cooked at home. Taste better too. The plain peanut butter cookies that it seems most people know about here are the best. Don't require any flour. This weekend I tried a brownie recipe with no flour. Pretty good. If you ask, I'll bring the recipes from home and post them for you.

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Thanks for the info. I live in the US, Texas. I was talking to someone today that was telling me I need to buy separate dishes (pots, pans, bowls, plates ect) because plastic can absorb the gluten. Is this true, is it really that important?? Thanks for the website. I am ready to start the ongoing process of gluten free. Just hope I can keep him away from other kids snacks. He stole another kids goldfish snacks today and he ate them before the teacher could get to him. He is having some trouble adjusting.

Yes and no. It is not that the gluten is absorbed by the plastic, but that it is trapped in the (invisible) scratches and pits. This is why you are recommended to either replace or get a second set, also of any non-stick pans, skillets, pots, cookie sheets, baking stones, and nylon, plastic, or wood cooking utensils.

CC (Cross-contaminiation) is a real problem. The US FDA 'safe limit' is 20 ppm, which for all practical purposes means nothing. Many people with celiac disease or GI react to amounts less than 10 mg of gluten. To give you a mental picture, take a small paperclip and straighten it out. That masses ~ 1 gram (1000 mg). Cut it up into 100 pieces. Each piece would amount to 10 mg. A standard sized piece (wonderbread style) of wheat bread contains ~48 grams (4800 mg) of gluten. So even a single invisible crumb can become an issue.

If you bake (especially using made from scratch recipes) in the same kitchen it can be very difficult to maintain a gluten-free area because the flour dust will settle on everything, no matter how hard you try.

One of the best things you can do is get your Dr. involved or find a GI/celiac disease aware doctor and get a letter prescribing or requiring a strict gluten free diet. At that point you will have some medical leverage issues with the school which will require them to adhere more strictly to your child's dietary needs.

Not all corn-tortillas are gluten free. Many places that produce corn tortillas share the same line as their wheat containing products, so it is best to research. Mission foods produces a white corn tortilla that is supposed to be gluten-free. Also 'Food for Life' makes a rice based tortilla I think.

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I recently read somewhere that Chicago is having some kind of free Celiac Disease screening. I wish i had more info for you, but try googling it.

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Yes and no. It is not that the gluten is absorbed by the plastic, but that it is trapped in the (invisible) scratches and pits. This is why you are recommended to either replace or get a second set, also of any non-stick pans, skillets, pots, cookie sheets, baking stones, and nylon, plastic, or wood cooking utensils.

CC (Cross-contaminiation) is a real problem. The US FDA 'safe limit' is 20 ppm, which for all practical purposes means nothing. Many people with celiac disease or GI react to amounts less than 10 mg of gluten. To give you a mental picture, take a small paperclip and straighten it out. That masses ~ 1 gram (1000 mg). Cut it up into 100 pieces. Each piece would amount to 10 mg. A standard sized piece (wonderbread style) of wheat bread contains ~48 grams (4800 mg) of gluten. So even a single invisible crumb can become an issue.

If you bake (especially using made from scratch recipes) in the same kitchen it can be very difficult to maintain a gluten-free area because the flour dust will settle on everything, no matter how hard you try.

One of the best things you can do is get your Dr. involved or find a GI/celiac disease aware doctor and get a letter prescribing or requiring a strict gluten free diet. At that point you will have some medical leverage issues with the school which will require them to adhere more strictly to your child's dietary needs.

Not all corn-tortillas are gluten free. Many places that produce corn tortillas share the same line as their wheat containing products, so it is best to research. Mission foods produces a white corn tortilla that is supposed to be gluten-free. Also 'Food for Life' makes a rice based tortilla I think.

Thanks. I bought him his own set of dishes and we have labeled all of his things in red. I am hoping that helps to remind us until we sink into a habit.

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I'm not aware of gluten being absorbed by plastic but the rest of the advice is good. If you have glass or stainless steel cookware, a really good scrubbing should do the trick. But any nonstick cookware that is well scratched, should probably not be used for his food. It just might be easier to designate a pan or two for his food use only. He needs his own toaster, you just cannot clean those well enough. If you use a colander for pasta, he should probably have a newone just for him.

You don't have to spend a fortune on alternate foods for him. You can buy gluten-free pasta for him at Walmart and it isn't very expensive. For bread, I just substitute corn tortillas, I imagine those are cheap in TX just like they are here in IN. Other than that, his special milk and regular meats and cheeses, fruits and vegetables. What else does he need besides that? If he needs other treats, they're really much cheaper cooked at home. Taste better too. The plain peanut butter cookies that it seems most people know about here are the best. Don't require any flour. This weekend I tried a brownie recipe with no flour. Pretty good. If you ask, I'll bring the recipes from home and post them for you.

I would love the reciepes. Our dinner and snack selection has not been very tasty as we are trying to work this all out. Thanks for all the help.

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I am very sorry I did not reply to you. Your response ended up in my Trash instead of my Inbox. I didn't realize that till today. I will get the recipes for you.

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I just wanted to say welcome. This board is a great resource. You may also find The Gluten-Free casein Free Diet website helpful as well. It was designed for parents of children with autism but they have an active community that keeps an updated shopping and products guide.

I actually did get new plastic storage containers because they were fairly scratched up and stained (from holding pasta and tomato sauce!) but it really is individual. Some people react to very small amounts, others don't.

I chose Red as my gluten-free color too as in "Stop! Bev's container (spatula, bowl etc).

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Finally! I have those recipes for you.

Flourless Brownies

1 15 oz. can of no salt added black beans, drained and rinsed.

3 large eggs

1/3 cup melted butter

1/4 cup cocoa powder

1/8 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons cane sugar

1/2 cup semi sweet chocolate chips

1/3 cup chopped walnuts

Butter an 8 inch baking pan. Place the black beans, eggs, melted butter, cocoa powder, salt, vanilla, and sugar in the bowl of a food processor and blend until smooth. Remove the blade and carefully stir in the chocolate chips and walnuts. Transfer mixture to the prepared pan, Bake the brownies for 3- to 35 minutes at 350 degrees or just until set in the center. Cool before cutting.

Honest to God, the BEST Peanut Butter Cookies, I Swear!

2 cups peanut butter

2 cups sugar

2 large eggs

2 teaspoons baking soda

a pinch of salt

1 teaspoon vanilla

Beat the peanut butter and sugar until fluffy. Add eggs, then soda, salt and vanilla. Drop dough into 1 inch balls onto greased cookie sheets. Sprinkle with sugar. Bake 8-10 minutes at 350 degrees till golden brown and puffy. Cool then eat!!

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Wow, so sorry- I did not know you replied with the recieps. Thanks a bunch, I cant wait to try them.

Finally! I have those recipes for you.

Flourless Brownies

1 15 oz. can of no salt added black beans, drained and rinsed.

3 large eggs

1/3 cup melted butter

1/4 cup cocoa powder

1/8 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons cane sugar

1/2 cup semi sweet chocolate chips

1/3 cup chopped walnuts

Butter an 8 inch baking pan. Place the black beans, eggs, melted butter, cocoa powder, salt, vanilla, and sugar in the bowl of a food processor and blend until smooth. Remove the blade and carefully stir in the chocolate chips and walnuts. Transfer mixture to the prepared pan, Bake the brownies for 3- to 35 minutes at 350 degrees or just until set in the center. Cool before cutting.

Honest to God, the BEST Peanut Butter Cookies, I Swear!

2 cups peanut butter

2 cups sugar

2 large eggs

2 teaspoons baking soda

a pinch of salt

1 teaspoon vanilla

Beat the peanut butter and sugar until fluffy. Add eggs, then soda, salt and vanilla. Drop dough into 1 inch balls onto greased cookie sheets. Sprinkle with sugar. Bake 8-10 minutes at 350 degrees till golden brown and puffy. Cool then eat!!

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