Jump to content
  • Sign Up
0
cyoshimit

Dog Food And Dog Bite

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Last Thursday my sisters puppy bit me, dont worry I took care of it right away and she has had all her shots, but soon after I believe that I had a reaction to the bite. My hand between my fingers have broken out into a blistery rash, I have fatigue again, I have gone hypoglycimic again, and brain fog has come back. I have not eaten anything out of the ordinary, and I was wondering if the bite from they puppy and the kibble she was eating affected me. Her bite did break my skin and it bleed a little so maybe I reacted to the kibble in her saliva? Is that possible?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last Thursday my sisters puppy bit me, dont worry I took care of it right away and she has had all her shots, but soon after I believe that I had a reaction to the bite. My hand between my fingers have broken out into a blistery rash, I have fatigue again, I have gone hypoglycimic again, and brain fog has come back. I have not eaten anything out of the ordinary, and I was wondering if the bite from they puppy and the kibble she was eating affected me. Her bite did break my skin and it bleed a little so maybe I reacted to the kibble in her saliva? Is that possible?

Unfortunately yes. I would do all the usual things to counteract a glutening attack including taking L-glutamine and enterically coated acidophilus, nattokinase and good food enzymes (with pancreatin and/or bromelain/paapain in them), lots of water and if you can handle it detox herbs like dandelion root (cleans out liver -- which also helps with skin), marshmallow root (to soothe) and cleavers (cleans out lymphs).

Bea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It sounds like you have DH. And yes I also would think that would be enough to get a reaction. You may luck out and not have the tummy effects but the DH will take a little while to clear up. Be careful what you put on the rash and the bite if you are using an antibiotic ointment. Polysporin is gluten free but Neosporin wasn't last time I checked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last Thursday my sisters puppy bit me, dont worry I took care of it right away and she has had all her shots, but soon after I believe that I had a reaction to the bite. My hand between my fingers have broken out into a blistery rash, I have fatigue again, I have gone hypoglycimic again, and brain fog has come back. I have not eaten anything out of the ordinary, and I was wondering if the bite from they puppy and the kibble she was eating affected me. Her bite did break my skin and it bleed a little so maybe I reacted to the kibble in her saliva? Is that possible?

I'm going to add my 2 cents in here because some of the information you have been given differs greatly from what I have learned about Celiac Disease. I would first suggest you read the book: Celiac Disease: The Hidden Epidemic because it explains the disease process and how you can actually become glutened....fact vs. fiction, so to speak.

Any true Celiac reaction, including a DH outbreak, happens from an internal ingestion of gluten, not a topical hit. Even if puppy breaks the skin, it would need to get into your GI tract for a reaction to occur and it cannot do that from a break in the skin. You have to swallow it through your mouth, inhale it into your nose and have it actually reach your gut, or get it into your eyes, like eye drops, for it to spark a reaction. You also have to ingest a certain amount for the likelihood of that happening. Agree with this or not, it's medical fact and a good thing for all Celiacs to know. Even a DH outbreak is an internally produced reaction, which results in the rash that follows.

It sounds like you may have an allergy, which is what produces a topical reaction. Any person with food intolerances is much more likely to suffer from additional allergies. It's very common. Unless the pup's kibble contained wheat, barley or rye and there was enough of an amount left in his/her mouth

AND you put the bitten area in YOUR mouth, you don't have to worry about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to add my 2 cents in here because some of the information you have been given differs greatly from what I have learned about Celiac Disease. I would first suggest you read the book: Celiac Disease: The Hidden Epidemic because it explains the disease process and how you can actually become glutened....fact vs. fiction, so to speak.

Any true Celiac reaction, including a DH outbreak, happens from an internal ingestion of gluten, not a topical hit. Even if puppy breaks the skin, it would need to get into your GI tract for a reaction to occur and it cannot do that from a break in the skin. You have to swallow it through your mouth, inhale it into your nose and have it actually reach your gut, or get it into your eyes, like eye drops, for it to spark a reaction. You also have to ingest a certain amount for the likelihood of that happening. Agree with this or not, it's medical fact and a good thing for all Celiacs to know. Even a DH outbreak is an internally produced reaction, which results in the rash that follows.

It sounds like you may have an allergy, which is what produces a topical reaction. Any person with food intolerances is much more likely to suffer from additional allergies. It's very common. Unless the pup's kibble contained wheat, barley or rye and there was enough of an amount left in his/her mouth

AND you put the bitten area in YOUR mouth, you don't have to worry about it.

My understanding is that the gluten actually enters the bloodstream via tight junctions in the intestinal wall (which is actually normal), but people with celiac disease produce antibodies to the gluten that other people don't. So this all actually happens in the bloodstream, the antibodies just so happen to attach the intestine as well as the gluten.

So in theory, I suppose gluten actually introduced into the blood stream via a different route, would produce the same results. This is different than just a topical exposure where the gluten stays on the surface of the skin.

So, it could just be a gluten reaction. If it doesn't get better pretty fast, I'd have it checked out just in case you have some sort of infection.

Here's a good explanation of the bloodstream thing:

How your guts work with celiac disease

When someone with celiac disease eats gluten, everything's going along just fine until the gluten reaches the small intestine.

The first thing that goes wrong at this point is that wheat causes the body

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to add my 2 cents in here because some of the information you have been given differs greatly from what I have learned about Celiac Disease. I would first suggest you read the book: Celiac Disease: The Hidden Epidemic because it explains the disease process and how you can actually become glutened....fact vs. fiction, so to speak.

Any true Celiac reaction, including a DH outbreak, happens from an internal ingestion of gluten, not a topical hit. Even if puppy breaks the skin, it would need to get into your GI tract for a reaction to occur and it cannot do that from a break in the skin. You have to swallow it through your mouth, inhale it into your nose and have it actually reach your gut, or get it into your eyes, like eye drops, for it to spark a reaction. You also have to ingest a certain amount for the likelihood of that happening. Agree with this or not, it's medical fact and a good thing for all Celiacs to know. Even a DH outbreak is an internally produced reaction, which results in the rash that follows.

It sounds like you may have an allergy, which is what produces a topical reaction. Any person with food intolerances is much more likely to suffer from additional allergies. It's very common. Unless the pup's kibble contained wheat, barley or rye and there was enough of an amount left in his/her mouth

AND you put the bitten area in YOUR mouth, you don't have to worry about it.

True, but the likelihood that the glutenous puppy licks did get on hands and face etc. is high--the effects of which then can easily enough get into the mouth. But you are right, it may be "just an allergy"...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My understanding is that the gluten actually enters the bloodstream via tight junctions in the intestinal wall (which is actually normal), but people with celiac disease produce antibodies to the gluten that other people don't. So this all actually happens in the bloodstream, the antibodies just so happen to attach the intestine as well as the gluten.

So in theory, I suppose gluten actually introduced into the blood stream via a different route, would produce the same results. This is different than just a topical exposure where the gluten stays on the surface of the skin.

So, it could just be a gluten reaction. If it doesn't get better pretty fast, I'd have it checked out just in case you have some sort of infection.

This is partly correct information, except for it being normal for anything to pass through opened junctions. That is Celiac Disease and we know that is not normal bowel function. However........the GI tract is a closed loop system. When healthy, nothing should get in or out by any other means than your mouth and your bum. The process which takes place when food is broken down in the small intestine and nutrients are then absorbed through the villi into the blood stream is an OUT door only. It is true that the tight junctions open up in Celiacs and allow particles to enter the blood stream, where antibodies start to develop BUT gluten or other matter will not make it's way INTO your gut via the same route. In other words, even if the dog had just eaten food containing gluten and had bitten someone, it won't get into your GI tract and cause a reaction. If this were not true, then humans would be dying off rapidly from all the toxins they are exposed to on a daily basis because they would make their way into your GI tract from a simple cut or bite. This is also why all Celiac doctors and publications tell patients not to sweat topical exposure....even with an open wound. Other than the possibility of an infection from the wound, you have to eat or ingest the offending agent so it reaches your gut for the Celiac reaction to occur. I just think it is extremely important for Celiacs and those with gluten sensitivity to be more knowledgeable about the process so they don't sweat a reaction when it isn't going to happen.

I have allergies on top of Celiac and they are 2 very different animals. Many people who post a possible intolerance reaction are actually having what sounds like an allergic reaction and they should learn the difference. It makes life a lot easier when living with Celiac Disease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×