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kkline

Enterolab Test Results

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This is very interesting. I am a researcher working on celiac disease in Norway. I have recently published a paper suggesting that DQ9 seems to predispose for celiac disease, based on studies from one single patient. Obviously investigation of more patients would be useful to confirm this association and how celiac disease manifests in this rare patient group.

Best regards,

Michael

Welcome to the board. I would be quite interested in this study. Do you have a link to it?

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It seems this thread has gotten away a bit from the OP's question.

My advice, if you can, is get a celiac blood panel done while you are eating gluten. Expect it to be negative, but do it anyway.

Then, go gluten-free. Ipersonally feel no one is benefiting by eating it!

This thread is a couple years old and the OP has not been around since asking the original question.

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Lol- teach me to look at the date and not just assume it is recent just because it got bumped up top!

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Lol- teach me to look at the date and not just assume it is recent just because it got bumped up top!

I think everyone does that now and then. :)

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Michael, there are some abstracts on pubmed about the japanese celiacs usually having DQ9, but that is because the japanese have so many DQ9. Of course you know that DQ9 and DQ7 differ from DQ8 by just one or two tiny things, base pairs or whatever.

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I found the new DQ9 pubmed abstract

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22342873

"Hum Immunol. 2012 Apr;73(4):376-81. Epub 2012 Jan 31.

Evidence that HLA-DQ9 confers risk to celiac disease by presence of DQ9-restricted gluten-specific T cells.

Bodd M, Tollefsen S, Bergseng E, Lundin KE, Sollid LM.

Source

Centre for Immune Regulation and Department of Immunology, Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. michael.bodd@rr-research.no

Abstract

We describe the gluten T-cell response of a DR7DQ2/DR9DQ9 heterozygous celiac disease patient (CD555). Interestingly, this patient had T cells recognizing gluten in the context of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules of both haplotypes. For the DR9DQ9 haplotype, DQ9 was identified as the antigen-presenting molecule. As DQ9 carries aspartate at DQ β57 but is otherwise identical to DQ8 and not considered associated with celiac disease, we aimed to characterize this DQ9-restricted T-cell response in detail. By fractionation of pepsin-trypsin digested gliadin we identified an epitope stimulatory for several T-cell clones. This epitope was identical to an epitope (DQ8-glut-1) previously identified in DQ8 patients. In CD555, this was the dominant DQ9-restricted epitope, whereas no T-cell response was found toward two other DQ8-restricted epitopes. These findings correlated with peptide binding data demonstrating that this epitope bound better to DQ9 than the two other DQ8-restricted epitopes. Although glutamine to glutamate exchange at P9 improved binding of all three epitopes to DQ8, no such effect was observed for DQ9. The differential ability of DQ8 and DQ9 to harness a negatively charged anchor at P9 may result in fewer potential gluten epitopes in DQ9 patients. Our data further indicate that DQ9 is a susceptibility factor for celiac disease.

Copyright © 2012 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID: 22342873 [PubMed - in process]

"

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