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mandaree

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I have tested positive for Celiac and try to eat accordingly. Several years before beig tested, I did an extensive blood allergy test called LEAP. It came back saying I'm allergic to Pumpkin, Pistachio, Caffeine, Honey, Rice, Green Beans, Cola, Solanine (chemical in night shade family), etc. Is it really possible that I am truly allergic to all these things. Sometimes if I eat rice or tomatoes, I get headaches immediately. I have a little bit of DH on my elbows but seem to have really bad itching, welts, etc when I eat most foods. Do I really have to resort to no nuts, no dairy, no soy, no eggs, etc as well? I feel as though all I can eat is seafood, meats, fruits and veggies. Is this the case? Also, how important is it that I use beauty products that are gluten free?

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The best thing to do is to cut your diet down to just meat and veggies that you know are safe for a couple weeks. Then add things in that are unknowns (like dairy and soy) one at a time and see how your body reacts (give yourself up to 3 days to make sure there are no delayed reactions). This is called an elimination diet. Many do have problems with some of those things, but some people also just have gluten-intolerance/celiacs and no other allergies. As far as the allergy foods, test those last or not at all if they are a life-threatening allergy. If you already know something bothers you (like the headaches) no need to bother testing it. Finally, make for yourself a list of foods you CAN eat and it won't be as overwhelming trying to decide what to eat.


A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

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LEAP testing has received a lot of criticism from the medical community for inaccuracy and lack of validation.

Allergists pretty much agree that the only way to be sure of a non-dangerous food allergy is with an elimination diet, as GlutenFreeManna has described. Obviously you wouldn't do that with a dangerous allergy like peanuts.

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I'd question the LEAP tests, as well. I've heard not so good things about it, sadly.

For me, after going gluten free, my body went kinda schizo and started reacting to everything. My docs don't think it's an allergy, but I DO react. However, this type of reaction seems to fade with time, for most people, if they stay away from the offending foods for a few months/years. I get instant headaches from a couple foods, for example.

That said, for the hives and itching part of things, that sounds like allergies, but I would honestly see if you can look to something that is more broad spectrum and IN a lot of foods, rather than such a wide range of foods. Not that it isn't possible to be allergic to lots of stuff, but it might be more likely to be allergic to a few things that are everywhere.

Corn - that's in almost everything, from iodized salt to baking powder. And, just since you reacted to these two, corn is used in ripening sprays on tomatoes and in the processing of white rice, so you get it there, too, if you are sensitive enough. If you have a corn allergy/sensitivity, you would get zapped constantly unless you know what to avoid. If you google corn allergy, a few sites with information pop up right away.

Sulfites - this, too, is in just about everything pre-prepared, any dried foods, alcohol, and there are foods with naturally occurring sulfites as well.

Pesticides - keeping track of companies, even for fresh produce, might help you at least find produce that you can have, if you are reacting to something ON the produce. Organics only might help eliminate some of these issues as well.

genetically modified foods - they are finding allergens in genetically modified foods that didn't exist before, so perhaps something oddball like that?

Bleach - I know one gal who literally reacts to bleach. So anything washed with bleach, like meats and veggies and fruits, make her desperately ill. They had to get a special filter to get rid of the bleach from their tap water, and her husband goes out and hunts all their meat and they grow their own produce, because of this.

Other allergens that are widespread? - I'm sure there are more that I've never heard of, yes? Perhaps some type of mold that is common in dried goods or fruits and veggies? A cleaning agent used by stores on their produce? A substance in their water supply that sprays over the veggies?

Oh, as for beauty products and gluten free? If it's on your lips, it's important, so lipstick and gloss should be gluten free, since you'll always ingest a little of that. If you use powder or cream around your mouth where you might get a little on your lips and in your mouth, that should likely be gluten free, too. If you ever get even the littlest bit of shampoo in your mouth when you wash your hair, you should get that gluten free, too.

Sigh...so much, eh? But once you find the stuff, not so bad, I think!

Also, I've heard many people here with DH who have had trouble with touching gluten of any kind. Whether it's allergy or part of the celiac, not sure. The medical profession says that it's not a part of celiac disease, but with so many people who ARE having trouble with it anyway, it might be worth taking extra care. Which would mean gluten free laundry detergent, soaps, dishsoap, etc...

Hopefully someone with DH may have some good ideas about what has helped and hurt them, gluten-wise?


T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive

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I went through a period where I was reacting to everything but it passed. I think it was about 3 months into the diet.

I cut dairy, soy and gluten all at the same time. I didn't cut every smidge of soy like lecithin, just obvious soy.

I am 7 months gluten free. I can eat some dairy now but I take it easy. if I go overboard I get bloated and crampy.

I can't eat soy, like soy flour or soymilk. It gives me bad stomach pain and stuffy nose.

I will never touch rat poison, oh I mean gluten, again.

I personally think it's not a good idea to freak out and start eliminating foods willy nilly. Your body needs a wide range of nutrients to have a powerhouse to do all that healing and rebuilding. Eat a clean simple diet and pay attention to how you feel after meals.

If after a few months you are still very sick you can then do a real elimination diet but do it carefully, scientifically and methodically so you can get accurate results.


Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.

Ready to get well and get on with my life!

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A diet which can be used for an elimination diet and is nutritious is the gluten-free Specific Carbohydrate Diet. I and others on this forum have found this diet very helpful.


DQ6/DQ8

HLA-DQ B allele 1 *0602: HLA-DQ B allele 2 *0302

Gluten free and Cow Dairy free since 2006

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