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TJ060306

Postive Then Negative Biospy

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Hi I had a positive biospy in oct 10 but my bloodtest were negative so the GI said it was prob not likley celiac. I was still have probs going the bath C&D so he did a colonoscopy and that came back with microscopic colitis. So I told him though that I was still having problems so he said well microscopic colitis could from celiac lets do another endoscopy. So that has brought me to Last monday and I have another endoscopy done. I went today for the results and it doesnt show villious blunting like my previous one did. So now my doc said I most likly dont have celiac that whatever cause the villious blunting before is going away. I told him I dont think so becuase I still fell like crap all the time. I went gluten free for 4 days and I ate gluten on fri and I felt like crap all weekend he said well maybe thats in your head feeling better. He treated me for microscopic coliots and told me to come back in 3 weeks. I asked well what will happen if I am not better hes like I dont know lets wait to see if it helps....

So my question is can something else cause villious blunting? Could maybe microscpotic colitis cause GI problems?

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Well, knowing that there i s a 20% false negative rate on biopsy testing, the second endoscopy could have been one of the one in five that are falsely negative. It could have been that the biopsy samples taken the second times were from areas of the small intestine that were unaffected, since it is known to be a disease which is patchy in the damage it causes. It would/could depend on how many samples he took and where he took them from.

It is possible to have celiac disease and microscopic colitis. There are posters on here who have both diseases. They would be the best to try to diferentiate their celiac symptoms from their microscopic colitis synptoms. An article here on celiac.com (from a lecture by Dr. Fine who founded Enterolab and is rather a controversial figure because everyone is waiting for him to publish his research) makes for some interesting reading. Dr. Fine reached his conclusions when he began studying microscopic colitis. http://www.celiac.com/articles/759/1/Early-Diagnosis-of-Gluten-Sensitivity-Before-the-Villi-are-Gone-by-By-Kenneth-Fine-MD/Page1.html What Dr. Fine has to say resonates with many of us, but as I say, his research has never been published in any peer-reviewed journal and is therefore not considered definitive Nevertheless, it may give you some insights into celiac/gluten sensitivity diagnosis..

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i dont understand what your doctor is thinking???? you had a positive biopsy the first time???? that means you have celiac.. Lord have mercy.. usually docs are reversed- they'll downplay the blood test and say that the biopsy is the "gold standard"

i would say you have celiac.

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Thanks for the responses I think that second biospy he was rushing I was the last appointment of the day and he was rushing I think. I told him to take lots of biospies I think he only only took 2 or 3. I dont know why but I would just really like to have the GI doc say its celiac, I need that reassurance that I am not crazy and this is a real problem.

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There can be other causes for villi destruction. ... it's not exclusive to Celiac Disease. Celiac is the least of the monsters.

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There can be other causes for villi destruction. ... it's not exclusive to Celiac Disease. Celiac is the least of the monsters.

What else could cause it? I have had a lactose and laculous breath tests and they both were very negative.

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From a MedScape Reference:

Although villous atrophy is not exclusive of celiac disease, it is considered a crucial finding. Other causes of blunted villi include tropical sprue, malnutrition, intolerance to cow's milk, soy protein intolerance, and infectious gastroenteritis. However, most of these conditions can be readily excluded on the basis of clinical history and laboratory data.

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From a MedScape Reference:

Although villous atrophy is not exclusive of celiac disease, it is considered a crucial finding. Other causes of blunted villi include tropical sprue, malnutrition, intolerance to cow's milk, soy protein intolerance, and infectious gastroenteritis. However, most of these conditions can be readily excluded on the basis of clinical history and laboratory data.

oh interesting... i had thought it was exclusive to celiac. i DID read that Casein can damage those villi too- but i dont always post everything i read, cause people negate it.

but anyways, that's interesting to know.

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