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I requested blood work from my doctor because I am still so fatigued, a tad anxious and depressed (not my personality at all!) gluten-free 3 months later and wondered about the thyroid function, folate levels, ferritin storage levels. I have had B-12 and D testing done and know those are good now. Notice,I said I REQUESTED because essentially, I am my own doctor. I will spare you the rant about the medical profession. :lol:

Come to find out ...YUP! LOW FOLATE LEVELS....I had read that can be low in those with celiac/malabsorption and so, the doctor has prescribed folic acid to boost me up.

Maybe THIS will help me with energy and low moods and my hair still falling out, a burning sore tongue, shortness of breath and a few others weird symptoms. I eat green leafy veggies, etc....but still, I am dragging myself around. By the way, I take a B-complex and apparently, that is not enough.

Just FYI...low folate levels (Vitamin B9) affect neurotransmitters like seratonin and dopamine...so if you are still feeling weak, moody and suffering from poor sleep, still having digestive issues even though you are positively 100% gluten free, maybe you should have your levels checked as well!!

here's some info on symptoms associated with low folate levels...

http://www.thehair.com/vitamins/folicacid.htm

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Thanks for the tip, I'll have to check into this as well. Let us know after a while if this seems to be working for you!

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Thanks for the tip, I'll have to check into this as well. Let us know after a while if this seems to be working for you!

I knew I had a B-12, D-3 deficiency and supplemented but still wondered what else was going on. I found this article interesting as well.

B Vitamin Supplements Recommended for Celiac Patients

by Gluten Free Advocates + Experts, Posted July 14th, 2010 at 2:15 pm

One of the major health concerns regarding a gluten-free diet is increased homocysteine levels. Recently, a recent study found that by taking B vitamin supplements, celiac patients can reduce this risk.What exactly is homocysteine? Homocysteine is an amino acid in the blood. Studies have shown that too much homocysteine in the blood is related to a higher risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Other evidence suggests that homocysteine may have an effect on atherosclerosis by damaging the inner lining of arteries and promoting blood clots.

Even when faithfully following a gluten-free diet, celiac patients are more likely to suffer from nutrient deficiencies and poor health. Gluten-free products are often low in B vitamins, calcium, vitamin D, iron, zinc, magnesium, and fiber as very few gluten-free foods are not fortified with these nutrients.

In the study that was recently conducted, celiac patients were treated with not only a gluten-free diet, healing their small intestine and increasing absorption of nutrients, but they were also given B vitamin supplements. It was found that those who took this supplement and maintained a gluten-free diet had significantly higher levels of B vitamins in the blood and lower levels of homocysteine, compared with a group who only maintained a gluten-free diet and another control group.

What does this mean for you? Researchers are now saying that B vitamin supplements should be considered in disease management. In addition to your gluten-free diet, you should take B vitamin supplements daily, making sure these include vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12. It is fortunate the celiac community now has this vital information, and as celiac research continues, we can look forward to more helpful data from researchers.

Article Courtesy: gluten-free Advocate Tina Turbin

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I requested blood work from my doctor because I am still so fatigued, a tad anxious and depressed (not my personality at all!) gluten-free 3 months later and wondered about the thyroid function, folate levels, ferritin storage levels. I have had B-12 and D testing done and know those are good now. Notice,I said I REQUESTED because essentially, I am my own doctor. I will spare you the rant about the medical profession. :lol:

Come to find out ...YUP! LOW FOLATE LEVELS....I had read that can be low in those with celiac/malabsorption and so, the doctor has prescribed folic acid to boost me up.

Maybe THIS will help me with energy and low moods and my hair still falling out, a burning sore tongue, shortness of breath and a few others weird symptoms. I eat green leafy veggies, etc....but still, I am dragging myself around. By the way, I take a B-complex and apparently, that is not enough.

Just FYI...low folate levels (Vitamin B9) affect neurotransmitters like seratonin and dopamine...so if you are still feeling weak, moody and suffering from poor sleep, still having digestive issues even though you are positively 100% gluten free, maybe you should have your levels checked as well!!

here's some info on symptoms associated with low folate levels...

http://www.thehair.com/vitamins/folicacid.htm

if you are taking a B12 supplement, make sure it is METHYLcobalamin and taken on an empty stomach

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if you are taking a B12 supplement, make sure it is METHYLcobalamin and taken on an empty stomach

thanks! yes, I have been using the methyl form sublingually for 4 years. THAT's why I was so pissed off about developing yet another form of anemia...if they had just tested that level as well...geesh!

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if you are taking a B12 supplement, make sure it is METHYLcobalamin and taken on an empty stomach

What exactly does this "methyl" mean? I just saw a Nature's Bounty Sublingual B-12 2500 mcg at Costco. It doesn't say "methyl" anywhere on there, does that mean I should skip it? On the label it says "Vitamin B-12 (as Cyanocobalamin)." I assume I want one that says "as methylcobalamin?"

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Yep, you got that right :) I am not sure now of the reasoning - RiceGuy is the expert on methylcobalamin. :D

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Also, is there a preferred brand anybody has? I usually try and buy stuff on Amazon because 2-day shipping is free, is there anything in particular I should look for? Or should I just get some from Whole Foods?

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I use NOW brand Methyl B-12 because it is soy, dairy and gluten free and not very expensive and it worked to get my levels up.

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I use NOW brand Methyl B-12 because it is soy, dairy and gluten free and not very expensive and it worked to get my levels up.

Ordered! Thanks for the recommendation, only $6.50 on Amazon!

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Ordered! Thanks for the recommendation, only $6.50 on Amazon!

You bet!

Did you have your both your B-12 and Folate levels checked before you start supplementing? Also, if you take the B-12, you should take a B complex with Folate, too.

Also, here is a long answer to your question about why WE should take the methyl form...but it is interesting!! :D

"Methylcobalamin is one of the two coenzyme forms of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin). Vitamin B12 plays an important role in red blood cells, prevention and treatment of anemia, methylation reactions, and immune system regulation. Evidence indicates methylcobalamin has some metabolic and therapeutic applications not shared by the other forms of vitamin B12.

Methylcobalamin is the active form of vitamin B12 that acts as a cofactor for methionine synthase in the conversion of homocysteine to methionine, thus lowering blood levels of homocysteine. Methylcobalamin acts as a methyl donor and participates in the synthesis of SAM-e (S-adenosylmethionine), a nutrient that has powerful mood elevating properties.

Your body needs this vitamin, in combination with other B vitamins, to maintain a healthy nervous system, maintain energy levels and production of good DNA.

The number one symptom for Vitamin B12 deficiency is feeling tired and lethargic. The B-Complex vitamins play an important role in carbohydrate digestion and energy production. Without all of the proper components this system can breakdown and cause a these symptoms. If left without diagnosis or treatment, B12 deficiency can lead to a serious medical condition, Pernicious Anemia. The symptoms of B12 deficiency include; shortness of breath, fatigue, rapid heart rate, loss of appetite, diarrhea, tingling and numbness of hands and feet, sore mouth, unsteady gait, especially in the dark, tongue problems, impaired smell and bleeding gums.

A high intake of Folic Acid can hide B12 deficiency. This condition is easily fixed by adding B12 rich foods to your diet or taking supplements. In most cases, Vitamin B12 should be taken in conjunction with a Folic Acid supplement and a B-Complex vitamin.

Methylcobalamin is a coenzyme form of Vitamin B12 which is biologically active. This means that your body can use it as is, and does not require any metabolic steps to make it body friendly. The Methylcobalamin comes in a sublingual tablet(dissolves under your tongue) because your digestive system modifies the molecule. The sublingual method allows the vitamin to directly enter your bloodstream, providing rapid benefits.

Cyanocobalamin is a synthetic, and inactive, form of Vitamin B12 that requires a number of metabolic processes to gain any benefit. This can be problematic in people with certain deficiencies and health issues. Unfortunately, this is the most common form of Vitamin B12 on the market and is found in most Vitamin B-Complex’s.

Vitamin B12 supplements. It has been shown in studies that 15% of people over 65 have Vitamin B12 deficiency. This is partially caused by a decline in the gastric system, which results in poor absorption of nutrients. The preferred source of B12 for the elderly is sublingual or injectable forms, since they bypass the digestive systems.

Another culprits for B12 deficiency is gastric acid-blocking products and medication, which can lead to decreased vitamin B12 levels. This is also related to people with malabsorption conditions such as Celiac disease, low stomach acid or those who have had stomach or intestinal surgery. Any stomach condition may result in poor absorption of nutrients.

If you have any of the symptoms or conditions associated with Vitamin B12 deficiency try taking a coenzyme form of B12, usually Methylcobalamin, and a B-Complex Vitamin with Folic Acid for a two week period. If you notice any benefits, great, and if not there was no harm done. You should always check with your doctor if your symptoms continue.

Vitamin B12 is a general label for a group of essential biological compounds knows as cobalamins. The cobalamins are structurally related to hemoglobin in the blood, and a deficiency of vitamin B12 can cause anemia. The primary concern of conventional doctors is to maintain adequate cobalamin status to protect against anemia.

The most common form of vitamin B12 is called cyanocobalamin. However, over the last ten years, a number of central and peripheral neurological diseases have been linked to a deficiency of a very specific cobalamin, the methylcobalamin form.

Published studies show that high doses of methylcobalamin are needed to regenerate neurons as well as the myelin sheath that protects nerve axons and peripheral nerves."

Hope that wasn't TMI!! :D :D :D :D

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Yes, I'm going to have to look into this! My B12 was high on my bloodwork because I had recently had a B12 injection. Not sure about folate, though, wasn't tested for that, but symptoms definitely sound...."familiar" :rolleyes:

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