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Hi everyone! I had some labs done recently and. First, I should say that I was almost entirely gluten-free for 2 months recently. I started eating gluten again so that I could possibly get a diagnosis. I had been eating gluten for about 3 weeks prior to the labs being done.

Deadimated Gliadin Abs, IgA 4 (0-19)

Deadimated Gliadin Abs, IgG 2 (0-19)

t-Transglutaminase IgA <2 (0-3)

t-Transglutaminase IgG 21 (>9 is strong positive)

So, the only thing I tested positive for was the tTG IgG.

My doctors don't seem to know much about gluten intolerance. I have a biopsy in about a month. Just wondering if anyone had any thoughts on the test results. Thanks!

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Transglutaminase IgG is concidered a little less reliable than ttG IgA, but everything I read says it is still very reliable, and you seem to have a strong positive. If it were me I would forgo the biopsy unless I needed it for insurance reasons or your own peace of mind. You already have a positive reading for a test which is more accurate than the biopsy. The biopsy might help you figure out how much damage you've already got, however.

It's a little strange that your ttg-IgA would be so relatively low. It's possible to have some general immune system deficiencies that can influence that. This is usually tested for in a celiac panel, but didn't seem to be in your case.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1773847/

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Thanks for replying! The panel did also include Endomysial Antibody IgA (negative) and Immunoglobin A, Qn, Serum which was 126 (70-400=normal). Sorry, I guess I should have included that info. It's frustrating when it seems like the doctors don't know any more about it than I do (and sometimes less!).

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They generally don't know as much, and as easy as it is to get angry about that, it's not really their fault. It's a very hard disease to catch, and a fairly small number of people have it. How much would you learn if you were a doctor and had two patients with a particular disease that they saw another specialist about anyway. If it even looks like you might have it you've probably gone and read 10X more on the subject than your doctor has ever come across. And remember what your GP doctor has seen is half remembered and thirty years out of date from med-school.

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I know. I'm not angry, just frustrated. Especially when the doctors think I'm a hypochondriac and that all of my symptoms are from "stress." Anyway, thanks again for replying!

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I guess I'm wondering if the positive tTG IgG is irrelevant if I'm not IgA deficient.

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I guess I'm wondering if the positive tTG IgG is irrelevant if I'm not IgA deficient.

No, it's not irrelevant. It is entirely possible that you do have something going on, and I would go ahead with the biopsy, especially if you are symptomatic.

Immunology is a very tricky science, and it is wrought with inconsistencies and the unexplained. I used to work in the field (I'm a med tech), and sometimes it's impossible to get a perfect picture of what a disease "should" look like on paper.

It makes me angry (yes, angry) when doctors disregard patients because they don't fit the "typical" picture. I understand that they are taught in med school that "if you hear hoof beats, look for horses, not zebras". But if the patient has proven themselves to not be a horse, it's time to see if they might be a zebra!! :angry:

I could go on, but I won't. I ate to much gluten today (stupid gluten challenge) that I feel like I am going to barf.

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I know. I'm not angry, just frustrated. Especially when the doctors think I'm a hypochondriac and that all of my symptoms are from "stress." Anyway, thanks again for replying!

Heh. My stomach troubles were "stress" from when I was six.

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Thanks for your reply, pain*in*my*gut! I know what you mean about doctors discounting you because you're not the "typical" celiac. Luckily the nurse practitioner at my GI office is more open-minded because she has family who had atypical symptoms of celiac disease, but even she isn't extremely knowledgeable on the subject. I guess we'll see what happens with the biopsy :rolleyes:.

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