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  • Scott Adams

    Is Maltodextrin Gluten-Free?

    Scott Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Maltodextrin made in the U.S. is gluten-free, unless specifically labeled otherwise.


    ADM plant in Clinton Iowa from California Zephyr. Image: CC BY 3.0--Loco Steve
    Caption: ADM plant in Clinton Iowa from California Zephyr. Image: CC BY 3.0--Loco Steve

    Celiac.com 07/03/2020 - In the USA Maltodextrin is generally made from potato, rice or corn, and the "malt" used in the process is not barley malt. So, in the US, maltodextrin is gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease, and Celiac.com includes maltodextrin on our Gluten-Free Safe Food & Ingredients List.

    According to US regulations,maltodextrin, gluten, gluten-free, safe, celiac, disease, Sec. 184.1444, "Maltodextrin" is a "non-sweet nutritive saccharide polymer that consists of D-glucose units linked primarily by [alpha]-1-4 bonds and has a dextrose equivalent (DE) of less than 20. It is prepared as a white powder or concentrated solution by partial hydrolysis of cornstarch, potato starch or rice starch with safe and suitable acids and enzymes."



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    While USA regulations permit maltodextrin to be made with wheat, it is very rare. Also, maltodextrin made with wheat will be labeled as "wheat maltodextrin" or "maltodextrin (wheat)." Any product that contains wheat should also have 'wheat' listed on the allergen disclosure. 

    For some people with celiac disease, especially those who are still in the process of healing the gut, gluten-free additives, like maltodextrin, can sometimes cause discomfort. 

    If maltodextrin, or other additives in processed foods, bother your gut, it's better to stick with simple, whole foods until the gut is fully healed. At that time, it's okay to test your sensitivity again, and to add back ingredients that seem to agree with you.
     

    Edited by Scott Adams

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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