Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Chrisser

Rough Time

Recommended Posts

I am not officially hypoglycemic, but I have all the same symptoms when my blood sugar crashes. I always have some kind of gluten-free food on me. I have found that Clif Nectar bars are extremely portable and great for when I start to get hungry. Sharkies are great too, they are kind of like fruit snacks for athletes, but they are gluten-free and contain enough sugar to sustain you until you can get some real food.

As far as regular food goes, I have found that rice and beans are a wonderfully easy staple. They have protein and carbs, and stick with me longer than most foods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Or do you have post meal (reactive) hypoglycemia? I think for that just glucose tablets would be the best.

I beg to differ with you Andrew.

For long-term maintenance of hypoglycemia, one cannot rely on sugars. They may have their place perhaps if one were about to pass out, but eating sugar causes an insulin rush which too quickly drops the blood sugar level and you are right back where you started from. Usually within 20 minutes.

Being proactive by planning small meals throughout the day, rather than reactive to a drop in blood sugar level is by far the best way to manage hypoglycemia.

I remember the doctor who first diagnosed me with hypoglycemia only told me to eat candy bars when I felt my blood sugar was going low. Thats all. Nothing about a change in diet. This was about the worst advice one can give. After researching on the internet about hypoglycemia I found out about using diet to maintain an adequate blood sugar level - which certainly does not include candy. Protein and high-fiber carbs (i.e.: vegetables) that are not quickly digested and don't trigger an insulin rush.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am not officially hypoglycemic, but I have all the same symptoms when my blood sugar crashes. I always have some kind of gluten-free food on me. I have found that Clif Nectar bars are extremely portable and great for when I start to get hungry. Sharkies are great too, they are kind of like fruit snacks for athletes, but they are gluten-free and contain enough sugar to sustain you until you can get some real food.

As far as regular food goes, I have found that rice and beans are a wonderfully easy staple. They have protein and carbs, and stick with me longer than most foods.

I am not officially hypoglycemic either. I start getting symptoms when I hit the high 80's and that is still "normal." According to my endocrinologist hypoglycemia doesn't hit until 60's and 50's. But man, sometimes when I hit low 80's/high 70's I'm ready to throw up and pass out. I'll have to look for those Clif Bars. I've tried Lara bars, but they are so incredibly sweet that it's hard for me to take more than a few bites.

I beg to differ with you Andrew.

For long-term maintenance of hypoglycemia, one cannot rely on sugars. They may have their place perhaps if one were about to pass out, but eating sugar causes an insulin rush which too quickly drops the blood sugar level and you are right back where you started from. Usually within 20 minutes.

Being proactive by planning small meals throughout the day, rather than reactive to a drop in blood sugar level is by far the best way to manage hypoglycemia.

I remember the doctor who first diagnosed me with hypoglycemia only told me to eat candy bars when I felt my blood sugar was going low. Thats all. Nothing about a change in diet. This was about the worst advice one can give. After researching on the internet about hypoglycemia I found out about using diet to maintain an adequate blood sugar level - which certainly does not include candy. Protein and high-fiber carbs (i.e.: vegetables) that are not quickly digested and don't trigger an insulin rush.

Perfect explanation, Artgirl. I really try to avoid anything high in sugar unless I absolutely need it with a bad crash. Right now my problem has been the planning. I've been so weak and tired that spending all day in the kitchen is hard. I'm barely making it one meal at a time. After meals I get excited because my blood sugar is level and I feel better, but then I get so tired that I just end up right back on the couch. Thankfully my mother is coming in town tomorrow to help me get back on my feet. That way all I have to do for the first couple of days is eat and sleep :lol: until I get some strength back. Then hopefully I can follow her lead, learn a few things, and start attacking my to-do list before I start my new job next Monday. I'm definitely terrified that I won't be back in decent enough shape to start work (especially since I've already had to ask once to pust back my start date), but I'm trying not to worry about that just yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris - I'm so glad for you that your mother is going to come and stay with you. This should be a great help to you, not only in getting things done and cooking, but a great morale boost, as well.

I got to thinking about your going to work and what I've done in the past, eating wise, while working and thought I'd pass on some of my more helpful methods.

CROCK POT

Let the crock pot do your cooking while you're away all day. Fill with meat, root vegetables, celery, onions --- those vegetables that won't get too soft. Add some sun-dried tomatoes for flavor (I just LOVE these).

FREEZE - FREEZE - FREEZE

---When you cook, cook a lot! Then freeze in individual serving sizes so you can just take something out of the freezer and heat it up for a meal. Meats, soups, stews, etc.

---When you roast meat, add water to make more broth. Then freeze the broth in an ice cube tray. When frozen, remove from tray into a bag. Later you can remove a few cubes at a time to use with a meal.

---Buy large quantities of sliced cold meats. Wrap many individual portions and freeze. They come in mighty handy all the time, even at home, when you need a quick protein fix.

EAT LEFTOVERS FOR BREAKFAST AND LUNCH

A good way to keep from having to constantly be cooking and preparing foods is to plan on eating last night's dinner for breakfast and/or lunch/or snacks. If you freeze what's left, then you won't get too bored with the same food.

COOLER AND ICE PAK

Invest in a small cooler and ice pak. You can take lots of foods with you to work so you have something to eat all day long that's not just crackers.

KEEPING FOOD AT WORK

If your work place has a refrigerator, then you might be able to keep a small Tupperware-type box in it with some raw vegetables and fruit - enough to last the week to reduce the amount of food you need to take with you every day. You will also want to have some non-perishable foods at your desk, like the Laurabars and other bars you can eat, nuts, and some small cans of vegetables that you like. Those 3.5oz cans of tuna (come in a package of six) are good to have on hand (be sure you also keep some utensils in your desk). And, keep some hard candy for emergencies when your blood sugar has dropped before you know what's happened and you need to get it up quickly, then follow up with protein, of course.

Hope this helps and gives you some ideas, too.

If you're real nice, maybe your mother will cook up a storm while she's with you and fill your freezer with enough to last a month or two.

I just thought of something else that's quick and easy to prepare and can be taken with you easily.

Take a cold hard-boiled egg (that you prepared the day before). Cut it in small pieces. Quickly defrost frozen peas in some hot water, then drain. Mix peas, egg, mayo and chopped pickles. This makes a nice salad to take along with you. Make enough so that you can leave half of it at home and have it again in the evening with your dinner (that's been cooking for you in the crock pot all day!!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...