Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Chrisser

Rough Time

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone, I'm having a really bad day with all of this and need some help. My gluten-related and detox symptoms are better, but the worst part about all this is trying to regulate my blood sugar. I can't get it up high enough and keep it level enough to have any normal amount of energy...even to shower and do things around my apartment. I woke up this morning at 5am with my blood sugar crashing and had to make something to eat. I've not gotten a decent night's sleep in like 2 weeks. I'm tired of eating. I'm tired of cooking. I've been eating the same things over and over because I haven't had enough energy to go anywhere long enough to get anything aside from the norm. Sometimes I get so hungry that I get nauseous, but I just can't palate the same foods over and over again. I'm also so afraid of going out and my blood sugar crashing and being away from gluten-free food. I don't know what to do. I start a new job a week from Monday, and it's adding so much stress to this whole thing. I need to get this under control, ASAP. I need to learn new recipes. I need to learn what to buy, what to cook and how to cook. I have errands to run. I have so much to take care of before I start work. Ugh, someone please help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Oh boy. That sounds like a miserable situation!

Are there any meds for hypoglycemia??


Negative biopsy for celiac 1980

Fibromyalgia 1980

IBS 1980

Interstitial Cystitis 1992

Systemic yeast

Diagnosed w/ Chronic Lyme Disease 2000

Diagnosed w/ Chronic babesia 2000

Tachycardia 2001

Asthma 2005

Have had Lyme and babesia for

about 48 yrs.

Began gluten-free July 19 '06

Native TEXAN living in Missouri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh boy. That sounds like a miserable situation!

Are there any meds for hypoglycemia??

Nope, no meds. Can only be controlled with food...but the intestinal damage doesn't help because I can't absorb most of what I eat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are loads of great recipes on this site-- check the site index-- & I'd recommend you quickly get hold of a copy of Bette Hagman's The Gluten Free Gourmet Cooks Fast & Healthy. Lots of help for someone who's not all that into cooking... but I predict you'll get more into it as you go. Plenty of folks on this site were non-cooks before they went gluten-free & had to learn-- it can be fun & the food you make yourself is always yummier & less boring than the same old stuff from the limited gluten-free selections most places.

Hang in there! It will get easier.

Leah


The Queen of Hearts,

She made some tarts

All on a summer's day.

The Knave of Hearts,

He stole the tarts

And took them clean away.

Diagnosed at age 49 by biopsy 31 May 2006

Learning how to bake those tarts gluten-free!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I definitely went through this and I know how horrible you must be feeling -- I was going through a breakup and the initial "detox effect" at the same time and for a few weeks I could barely drag myself to the kitchen and make the same breakfast I've had no problem making for seven years -- the hunger and the stress and the emotional yuckiness really all kind of piled up and I felt awful -- it did get a whole lot better, but it took some rough moments.

Aside from learning new recipes and such, I found that it helped me to stock up on some things that I could just have with almost no effort -- I've got cans of tuna, jerky and different kinds of nuts in the house to provide fast protein because that's what will help you keep your blood sugar stable. I ate a lot of peanut butter and a lot of hummus once I'd broken down and bought some gluten-free bread (couldn't go without bread as easily as I thought I could at first, however, corn tortillas are good as well). I also resorted to Boost+ for a while when my weight got really low.

I don't know how much cooking you do, but here are some easy things I fall back on for more protein:

Tuna salad can be made with tuna, mayonnaise and lemon juice -- throw some walnuts, avocado and salt and pepper in there and you've got something pretty tasty to eat over rice or bread or anything else.

Plain, canned black beans can be heated up with a little oil in a skillet and mashed with garlic and perhaps cumin (use McCormick or another brand that's sure to be gluten-free) to make refried beans.

I've rediscovered hamburgers -- bought 20% ground chuck at the market and I basically just form the burger around a pat of butter (this is from an old NYTimes recipe) with salt and pepper and cook it on medium high heat each side for 4-5 minutes or so. This is exciting and new for me as I'd virtually given up red meat until I went gluten-free. I slather the burger with horseradish, mustard and anything else I can think of and have it on the side with some rice or quinoa or potatoes or something.

I ate an avocado-cashew salad a day for about a week until I got scared about developing another intolerance (I haven't). I basically cut up a whole avocado, throw in some cashews, salt, pepper good olive oil and good red wine vinegar.

This stuff is just off the top of my head -- hope something in here is useful. After several months, I've actually gotten myself back into courageous cooking mode and I'm making a lot more soups and stews and things, but it was important to get over the hump!

eleep


Erica

Inconclusive blood test results

Positive Enterolab results

Positive dietary results

gluten-free since 2/10/06

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nope, no meds. Can only be controlled with food...but the intestinal damage doesn't help because I can't absorb most of what I eat.

Your drugstore should have glucose tablets that diabetics use when their sugar gets too low. They could help. Something else that might help is adding more protein into your diet. I have diabetes as a result of the undiagnosed celiac and I keep a bag with a mix of gluten free nuts, some raisens and some gluten free bittersweet chocolate on hand and snack on that constantly. I make sure that as I get ready for bed I eat some protein and carbs (usually the mix) or a gluten-free cracker with pnut butter or cheese. It helps to regulate the blood sugar as we sleep and keeps me from going too low or too high. Try to eat a protein and a carb together every couple hours. When I really don't feel like eating at all I grab a gluten-free supplement shake or mix up some carnation powdered instant breakfast (any flavor but choc malt and not the ready to drink). Try to not go overboard on sugar, ie candy, cookies etc. They will raise your sugar quickly but then make it drop. I hope this helps a bit. I'm sure others will also be on with some suggestions. It does seem to be a common problem.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think banana is pretty high in carb, if you can eat that...and it has its own container - you have to respect a food that brings its own tupperware.

I eat lots of nuts.

I used to get so nauseus when waking because I had gotten hungry in the night. I started waking up at 5am and having a bowl of cereal, then going back to sleep. Thankfully, I seem to have gotten over that since you're right, it seems with Celiac we are constantly in the kitchen messing the place up. Celiac has given me dishpan hands.

Amazake (sp?) rice and almond shakes are good and have a good kick to them - that's what I used when I was dragging myself all over town while killing yeasties (was exhausting - but the drink helped).

I ditto the protein thing. Ever since I started having protein with every meal, I feel so much better. What about apples with almond butter. I put two drops of stevia and a dash of cinnimin in there to add spunk. Yum.

I hope you feel better. I know it really sucks to not have the energy to do anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone for the replies. I'm just an emotional mess right now that I can't think straight and can't keep track of what I'm eating (I just know I don't like it anymore). And some of the things that some of you mentioned I am either allergic to just don't like at all. Some of the other things that I have and like just aren't enough to keep my blood sugar stable. I pretty much have to have close to full meals every time I eat otherwise my blood sugar starts crashing. My limited diet is what is so frustrating, and I do like to cook, but right now just don't have the energy to (and don't have a lot of ingredients). So it's been so frustrating not being able to get to the stores to get cookbooks and ingredients, and being stuck in the house all the time is really starting to get to me as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get tired of eating salads and vegetables, even though they are good for maintaining one's blood sugar levels. I often put raw vegetables in the blender, add a some water and maybe some stevia if the vegetables are not particulary sweet, and puree into a vegetable "smoothie". I vary the vegetables, but put at least three different kinds each time. I've even used defrosted frozen vegetables (even less work - no washing or peeling).

I make up enough for a large mug or medium-sized glass (probably 1-2 cups with the water), then drink from it off and on throughout the morning. Even if I down the whole drink at one sitting, I don't get hungry for at least two hours. I guess it's all the fiber.

I wouldn't have more than one moderate serving of raw vegetables a day - all that fiber you know - can cause some gas if you overdo.

Before I had to go dairy-free, I used to buy whey protein powder. I'd have a serving of it mixed in water (I guess milk would be fine, too) before I went to bed, and as soon as I got up in the morning. It was very helpful in stabelizing my blood sugar. I'd also carry with me a small plastic container with a lid filled with a tablespoon or so of the powder and if my blood sugar began to drop when I was away from home, I could just add water, shake, and drink.

I find if I stay away from the starchy carbs (breads, crackers, etc.) and eat vegetables, meat and fats, I can go longer between my mini-meals. Also, I avoid high-sugar fruits like oranges and grapes. Melons, strawberries, and Granny Smith apples have less suger and more fiber so they are digested more slowly and don't trigger high insuline release.

Hope you are able to get a handle on this very soon so you are ready for the new job.

Edit: Chrisser - you posted while I was writing. Do you have someone who could go shopping for you - they could at least get whole foods and meats for you without the risk of gluten.


Valda

Enterolab results: ...two genes for gluten intolerance ...casein intolerance

other sensitivities: corn, eggs, soy, potato, tapioca

Hypoglycemic

Sensitivity to high EMFs [electromagnetic frequency] (limits my time in front of the computer)

Living a healthier, happier life.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.Psalm 139: 9,10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chrisser,

I haven't experienced what you are going through but I do know if I don't have enough protein during the day I get shaky and sometimes dizzy. Can you share what your intolerances are so we have more to work with. Also the foods you don't like?


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think banana is pretty high in carb, if you can eat that...and it has its own container - you have to respect a food that brings its own tupperware.

:D


Negative biopsy for celiac 1980

Fibromyalgia 1980

IBS 1980

Interstitial Cystitis 1992

Systemic yeast

Diagnosed w/ Chronic Lyme Disease 2000

Diagnosed w/ Chronic babesia 2000

Tachycardia 2001

Asthma 2005

Have had Lyme and babesia for

about 48 yrs.

Began gluten-free July 19 '06

Native TEXAN living in Missouri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chrisser,

I haven't experienced what you are going through but I do know if I don't have enough protein during the day I get shaky and sometimes dizzy. Can you share what your intolerances are so we have more to work with. Also the foods you don't like?

They aren't intolerances, but actual allergies. I'm allergic to cantaloupe, honeydew, bananas, apples, and peaches. I don't like avocados, beans, most nuts except for peanuts and cashews, eggs, tofu...that's all I have off the top of my head right now.

Artgirl - my brother has actually been helping me out a lot. He just went to the store and bought me some meat today. But because he doesn't really know much about this, it's hard to send him out for much else. Plus, he's not the best shopper, anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chrisser--

I am finding that I do so much better if I have some protein with every meal. The downside for me is that the only protein that agrees with me are meats and almonds.

Without the protein, I get a little shaky, hungry, and mentaly fuzzy.

I understand the boredom of having to stick to few foods--but you need to eat. I buy hormone-free ground beef and make individual patties to keep in the freezer. Also boneless pork chops. If you have single servings of protein foods, you can have some with a salad one time, a baked potato another time, and stir fried with veggies another...you get the idea. I'm not sure which foods are ok for you, but if you can do eggs, they can be quick and made in a variety of ways.

I hope you feel better soon :)


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest nini

you sound just like me in the beginning... I was so weak and ill and didn't feel like eating, but needed to keep my blood sugar up and I needed to take care of my daughter as well...

I found that plain rice (steamed) and a select variety of cheeses, verified gluten-free nitrite, nitrate, hormone and antibiotic free lunchmeats, black eyed peas, and bananas were the only things I could make myself eat for a while. I got REALLY sick of rice... but I figure that there are many cultures throughout the world that eat primarily rice so I could do it too. Eventually I was able to start adding more things into my diet and things that I was previously allergic to (yes allergic) I was no longer reacting to anymore. Don't ask me why, I don't know. Maybe because I got so sick that my body started reacting to EVERYTHING. I was even lactose intolerant but I had to eat the cheeses to keep up my energy... anyway, it got better for me too, it just takes time.

Find the few things that you can have that are easy to fix and focus on them for a while. You don't need to worry so much about variety at this point. Make sure you are taking a good gluten-free multi vitamin, a probiotic and digestive enzymes...

oh and did I mention I got really really sick of rice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Make sure you are taking a good gluten-free multi vitamin, a probiotic and digestive enzymes...

I've been so horrible about taking my medications, including my vitamin. In reference to the enzymes, I know I need to take those, but I don't know which one to get. I've read a few posts about them on here and another board but am still pretty clueless. Any help on those as well?

Unfortunately, I need variety in my meals otherwise I get sick of them very quickly. Going gluten-free has taken a lot out of how I used to prepare them (used to marinate my chicken and bread my pork chops), so everything is so bland now. I've been living off chicken, rice, and peanut butter, and I'm so sick of them already. Tonight I'm going to try to swing by Barnes & Noble after dinner and pick up a few books. It's steak and baked potato for the 2nd night in a row :(

I've just become so obsessed with food since going on this diet. Even if I eat one thing and am full I'm already planning the next move. Do I have anything that's not frozen? Have I eaten enough to tide myself over? What have I eaten? UGH. It's seriously depressing me...to the point where it's really getting hard to fight the blood sugar crashes. I feel like I need someone standing in front of me showing me what to do and what to eat, but there's no one around here that understands. My mom lives in NY, and even though she's had good ideas, she doesn't e-mail to me like I ask her to because I never remember what she says on the phone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also eat rice. I typically will have rice with meat (and/or eggs for me) and then fruit on the side. I have that for my brunch, if you will. I also make sure I have meat for dinner. If I get hungry in between I figure out a snack. I only eat two meals most times but don't necessarily recommend that, especially when you are trying to balance out your blood sugar. If veggies sit well with you then you can alter your types of meat with various veggies, steamed, broiled, stir fried. I am a former vegan since I found out I was allergic to soy & gluten (see sig), then found out I was intolerant to both as well. Since I was raised a meat eater it wasn't hard for me to switch back....my children are another story. Look for meats that you can snack on like nitrate/nitrite free beef dogs, jerky, smoked salmon (if that's gluten free). There have been times when I haven't had enough protein that I've grabbed a cold beef dog (we buy applegate farms) to help calm the shakes and then scrounge around for something else to eat. We also like Lara Bars, but if you can't eat nuts that wouldn't work for you. There are a lot of good recipes on this forum if you have the time and energy to look through the baking and cooking tips section. You would just need to weed through what you can't eat. Many things can be substituted.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest nini

focus on what you CAN have...

have you seen the my newbie survival kit yet? it might help you find some variety that you can add to your diet. To get the newbie kit just click on the link in my signature to go to my webpage, at the bottom of my web page there is a link to download the Newbie Survival Kit. Let me know if you need help with the files.

For vitamins and digestive enzymes, I use a product called Isotonix by Market America. You can google their website and find a rep near you or order it off the web I think. The products are in a powder form and you mix one capful with a measured amt. of water and drink it like alka seltzer.

there are other good multis and probiotics and digestive enzymes that you can get at your local health food strore or even at places like CVS and Walgreens. It is very important for all diagnosed Celiac's to be taking a good multivitamin, a probiotic and digestive enzymes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take it slow, maybe add one new thing at a time -- this may seem like a lot to learn, but it gets easier.

I suggest getting a copy of The Joy of Cooking if you don't have one already. If you're going to be eating meats for protein, it has a lot of really good suggestions for cooking meat fish and poultry in very basic ways that can be jazzed up with various suggestions in the book -- I've had to learn to cook meat in totally new ways recently myself.

Boneless pork chops are an excellent idea -- I use the sauteed pork chop recipe in the Joy of Cooking -- takes very little time and I generally throw some wine in the pan after the chop is done and cook it down a little with a pat of butter to make a really excellent sauce that goes well over the chop and some potatoes.

Also, don't know where you live, but it might be a good idea to get a small gas grill if you don't already have one -- that's a really easy way to cook meat (almost anything, frankly) that's always tasty and good. I've been doing a lot of salmon on the grill.

My ex-boyfriend was an excellent cook and also very organized about his kitchen. He taught me to buy meat/fish/etc.... in larger portions, take it out of the package and saran-wrap in individual portions (I've got a restaurant-supply-store roll of the stuff -- it's of better quality) and freeze those in freezer bags. This makes it very easy to pull something out in the morning to defrost and have it there to cook when you come home -- or, if your microwave has a defrost function, you could use that as well.

eleep


Erica

Inconclusive blood test results

Positive Enterolab results

Positive dietary results

gluten-free since 2/10/06

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry you are feeling so rotten. I ate a lot of rice in the beginning, I got very sick of rice too :lol: but at least it was easy to digest and filling. Have you tried Ensure or a product like that? I think protein is key, I used to have low blood sugar and would feel like I was going to faint or lose my mind if I didn't eat immediately but after increasing my protein intake it went away. Back to the rice, I would add it to organic chicken broth to make a fast soup, maybe some carrots or green peas if you can tolerate them. In the beginning I found an ulcer diet the easiest to follow, my whole gastric tract was so inflamed that when I tried to eat brown rice it was like digesting broken glass, quinoa had the same effect. Anything with a peel is harder to digest so vegetable or fruits with skins must be peeled and green peas and beans avoided.


A family with Celiac disease, two brothers and two sisters.

Lyme Disease, Diagnosis October 19, 2006

May 2006 - December 2008 Gluten and Dairy Free

December 2008, while seeing improvement on the gluten free diet, I did not recover and so in December of 2008 began the SCD and now have hope for recovery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also really had to let all my cooking aspirations go to hell for a while when I was just trying to recover, heal and reduce the stress of the whole situation. I didn't much like eating or food for several months (a total reversal of my usual attitude) and so I basically just treated it as functionally as possible. So, while I was upset about lack of variety as well, I had to get to a less-stressed and wiped-out place before I could do anything about it.

At that point, I was eating a lot of gluten-free bars -- Bumble Bars, Larabars and Clif Nectar bars -- between meals just to get me through. They do come in many flavors, so I can't say that I ever got sick of them.

Also -- on top of my mulitivitamin, I added sublingual B complex -- which really helps me with the stress.

eleep


Erica

Inconclusive blood test results

Positive Enterolab results

Positive dietary results

gluten-free since 2/10/06

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unfortunately, I need variety in my meals otherwise I get sick of them very quickly. Going gluten-free has taken a lot out of how I used to prepare them (used to marinate my chicken and bread my pork chops), so everything is so bland now. I've been living off chicken, rice, and peanut butter, and I'm so sick of them already. Tonight I'm going to try to swing by Barnes & Noble after dinner and pick up a few books. It's steak and baked potato for the 2nd night in a row :(

Sorry you're going through this. I went through a similar time when I first found out I couldn't have wheat and a number of other foods. It took a while to figure out what to eat and how to make it.

I second the motion to try to get more protein. Also, why can't you marinate your chicken? I do all the time in Italian dressing, Caesar dressing, or in balsamic vinegar and olive oil with some seasoning. You can easily make bread crumbs by drying gluten-free bread (even the yucky stuff usually makes good breadcrumbs) or by crushing up gluten-free rice crispy-type cereal or cornflakes.

You can also bread fish with rice flour, crushed rice cereal, paprika and salt and bake it in the oven. Or grill salmon with olive oil and lemon. Try adding things to your rice like chopped nuts, raisins, saffron threads, coconut oil, grated carrots (all of these things together is actually really yummy), or other dried fruits, onions, garlic and vegies of your choice. Plain rice gets really boring. Cook up a big batch of rice and make fried rice the next day - you don't even need soy sauce, just olive oil, garlic and salt and a few vegies and chunks of chicken or meat.

Have you looked at Tarnalberry's or Carriefaith's threads on easy, yummy gluten-free recipes? That might give you some inspiration.


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Protein, protein, protein! :) Tuna, though strong tasting, can keep you going for a while, and is very easy to prepare. If you have a Wegman's near you get Wegman's best quality tuna- it's great. You can eat it right from the can. Everyone else has great advise too - eggs, protein mixes, etc... also I like green peppers - just rince and cut open and eat. For now you might have to satisfy enjoyable food to sustain your body while you heal. Meanwhile we'll all be here for you. Good luck, I'll say a prayer for you!

-Christian


Gluten free since 7/6/06. :)

Enterolab Results positive 8/24/06:

Antigliadin IgA 33 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 16 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA antibody 21 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 8,5)

Blood test somewhat positive 7/6/06:

Antigliadin IgG (only) 57 (Normal range <20 units)

"Perspective is Reality"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone for the support and recommendations. I'l try to work as best I can with what you've given me and my likes and dislikes. I know I'll get past this hump eventually...just kind of hard to see past it right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that tuna comes up again, it reminds me that one of my favorite things to do lately has been to go to the really good fish market and get sushi grade tuna. I don't have time to roll out sushi right now, but I do make a spicy tuna tartare thing by chopping it up with a little mayo, tabasco, sesame oil, soy sauce, rice vinegar, salt, pepper and . Don't have proportions for this, it's just something I kind of throw together.

Of course, I was talking canned tuna earlier and I'm a little leery about recommending raw tuna to anyone since you need to be sure it's sushi grade (which can be spendy) and mercury can be an issue for some people, especially pregnant women.

eleep - Holy cow.. how did you get up there... did you climb? (your picture)

Yes. There's a trail, however, and it's kind of bouldery -- not anything involving special climbing gear or anything super impressive like that. It's Mt. Marcy in New York and it's a fairly accessible climb for anyone who might want to do it -- providing you're in good shape and don't have some kind of knee injury -- I had a 32 pound pack on and almost permanently injured my knee on the way down. I'd recommend a walking stick or trekking poles for anyone who wanted to do the same thing.


Erica

Inconclusive blood test results

Positive Enterolab results

Positive dietary results

gluten-free since 2/10/06

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just out of curiosity are you an insulin dependent diabetic? You could go to an pharmacy and pick up Glucagon injection kit in cases of severe hypoglycemic episodes. Or do you have post meal (reactive) hypoglycemia? I think for that just glucose tablets would be the best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites