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Lissa

Stories That Make You Smile

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I'm an eleven grade student, and a few weeks ago, my teacher nearly made me cry. You see, at the beginning of the year, my religion teacher told us that she hates students that miss a lot of school. Last year, I missed close to 40 days of school due to gluten reactions, and because I'd only discovered my gluten issues at the end of May, I wasn't sure how often I would be glutened accidently, and therefore, how much I'd be absent this year. I was also determined not to let my gluten issues rule my life, and decided not to inform my teachers about my gluten intolerance. But since my religion teacher hates people who miss a ton of school, I felt like I had to explain about my gluten intolerance, and how it might affect my attendence. She was very sweet and understanding about it, and I felt better after informing her.

So it was a Friday when she said that she had a treat for the class, that she had cookies for everyone, and we could eat them while we watched a movie today. I was a bit disappointed, but hey, it's life, so I remained seated while my classmates got their cookies. Then, my teacher called me to come up to the front, and she pulled out a brand new bag of Mi-Del Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies. She searched specifically for something that I could have. I hugged right then and there, and thanked her. The entire class learned about gluten intolerance and they all tried a gluten-free cookie. It was a pretty awesome experience, and made me feel on top of the world. Today, it was cookie day again. I couldn't have cared less, as I still couldn't believe that she had gone through all that trouble the first time, but yet again, my teacher called me up. She handed me the leftover gluten-free Chocolate Chip Cookies, and a second bag of Mi-Del Gluten Free Ginger Snaps. I couldn't believe it. I thanked her profusely and ate my cookies :).

Sometimes an experience like that makes up for all the people who are rude, and uncaring.

Oh, and the other day, my family and I ate out at Kelsey's. The minute gluten - free left my mouth, the waitress left and returned with the manager, who talked me through the entire menu, explaining what I could have, and what I couldn't. He was incredibly nice and knew about the disease - he said that his brother has Celiac, and he understands what it's like to be glutened. They made my dinner from various items and he supervised all of it. It was wonderful!

Those are my stories....let's hear some others. We can complain about how insenstive people can be, so let's counteract those bad feelings and spread some stories that make you smile!

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Hi Lissa

What a wonderful experience & a great happy story. If only there were more sincere , understanding humans like your teacher.. And it was so nice of you to share your cookies with your classmates & a great learning lesson for all.

Thanks for sharing.

mamaw

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Ok...I have one...

Smugglers Notch, near Stowe, VT, is a year round resort that my family's been going to for about 35 years. Anyway, last summer, I was taking my girls to camp and ran into a man who I knew was fairly high up in management at Smugglers. Anyway, I also knew he was very nice so I struck up a conversation with him and told him about food allergies/celiac and he was very receptive and extremely interested. Anyway, I told him how I had forgotten to bring up some gluten-free pasta on that trip and how I had to go to about four stores in about two hours before I found any. They have a small convenience store in Smugglers and I mentioned to him how great it would be to have them carry some gluten-free items and how it would be great to have the restaurants within the resort be accommodating to a gluten-free diner. Like I said, he was very receptive. The very next day, he set up a meeting with me and the chefs in the restaurants and the manager of the conveniece store. Now, a couple months later, the store is carrying gluten-free items and it's possible to get a delicious gluten free meal in the restaurants! So, anyone looking for a great family resort that is very celiac friendly, Smugglers is waiting for you!

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Hi Lissa,

That's a great story. My boss is the second (third?) cousin of the gubner of the state of Maine, a vegetarian and always very thoughtful about my diet when it comes to meetings and holiday celebrations. She even gave me a recipe for peanut butter cookies that were gluten-free that she had brought for an occasion. She has missed the mark once or twice, but keeps on trying, you can't get any better than that!

Recently I was at a restaurant and the chef actually came out to talk to me about my dietary needs. I feasted upon mussels in dijon cream sauce with a side of rice and a lovely, edible orchid blossom as a garnish.

I believe that people want to help, given the information that they need to do so.

Go girl!

Margaret

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What great stories!

Here is one about my daughter. A boy in her class (she is in 5th grade, this boy has been a bit sweet on her since Kindergarten) was having a birthday. He was planning on bringing in snacks for everyone in the class but didn't want to leave Victoria out (even though we have a yummy stash for her in the classroom). He had his mom call us and see what he could bring in that was safe for DD to eat. Sure enough, day of his birthday celebration in class, there was a Haagen Daz bar for her.

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I thought of one!

My grandmother used to make this wonderful banana pudding, coconut pie, and chocolate pie with the same basic recipe. A few years ago, I sat down and watched her make it and wrote down the recipe (she didn't use a set recipe). Eating these dishes was a tradition in my family, and something I will NEVER forget. There wasn't a proper family gathering without my grandma's banana pudding. My grandmother died just over a year ago after suffering from Alzheimers for a few years. Anyway, I was so dissapointed when I was diagnosed because I couldn't make my grandma's recipe anymore. Well, my brother (who is not a celiac) asked me for the recipe, and within 2 wks, he had converted it to gluten-free, and he said is was wonderful. He said he wanted to make it for the holidays for all of us "Celiacs." I just wanted to cry, I was so happy! It really touched me that my brother would do this, because he isn't normally so sweet!


ptkds

Mom of 4 beautiful girls (the 2 youngest are only 10 months apart!)
Diagnosed with Celiac disease on November 8, 2006; gluten-free as of 12-1-06.

DD#2 13 years old; diagnosed on November 28, 2006. gluten-free as of 12-7-06.
DD#3 9 years old; diagnosed through blood work in October 2006. Gluten-free as of mid-November and doing GREAT!!
DD#4 8 years old; had a scope done on 6-22-07 (at 14 months old) and the dr saw stomach ulcers, but all test results were negative. GI dr told us to put her on the gluten free diet anyway. She is gluten free as of 6-22-07.

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Those are my stories....let's hear some others. We can complain about how insenstive people can be, so let's counteract those bad feelings and spread some stories that make you smile!

So glad you asked.......

I've been Gluten Free for four months.....do great as long as I eat at home but my husband and I were "required" to go to a Black Tie Dinner this past Friday night. (You can all imagine how I was dreading it) When we entered the dinner our waiter was posted at our table so I went up to them explained that I had Celiac and must eat gluten-free....asked if they could please ask the chef what they were serving that I could eat and I'd eat only that. A few minutes later they came back to me and explained they were having a Gluten Free dinner prepared just for me!!!! They did just that...I ate it and had NO problems......I am and was sooooo thankful!!!!! :rolleyes:


Del

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I'm an eleven grade student, and a few weeks ago, my teacher nearly made me cry. You see, at the beginning of the year, my religion teacher told us that she hates students that miss a lot of school. Last year, I missed close to 40 days of school due to gluten reactions, and because I'd only discovered my gluten issues at the end of May, I wasn't sure how often I would be glutened accidently, and therefore, how much I'd be absent this year. I was also determined not to let my gluten issues rule my life, and decided not to inform my teachers about my gluten intolerance. But since my religion teacher hates people who miss a ton of school, I felt like I had to explain about my gluten intolerance, and how it might affect my attendence. She was very sweet and understanding about it, and I felt better after informing her.

So it was a Friday when she said that she had a treat for the class, that she had cookies for everyone, and we could eat them while we watched a movie today. I was a bit disappointed, but hey, it's life, so I remained seated while my classmates got their cookies. Then, my teacher called me to come up to the front, and she pulled out a brand new bag of Mi-Del Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies. She searched specifically for something that I could have. I hugged right then and there, and thanked her. The entire class learned about gluten intolerance and they all tried a gluten-free cookie. It was a pretty awesome experience, and made me feel on top of the world. Today, it was cookie day again. I couldn't have cared less, as I still couldn't believe that she had gone through all that trouble the first time, but yet again, my teacher called me up. She handed me the leftover gluten-free Chocolate Chip Cookies, and a second bag of Mi-Del Gluten Free Ginger Snaps. I couldn't believe it. I thanked her profusely and ate my cookies :).

Sometimes an experience like that makes up for all the people who are rude, and uncaring.

Oh, and the other day, my family and I ate out at Kelsey's. The minute gluten - free left my mouth, the waitress left and returned with the manager, who talked me through the entire menu, explaining what I could have, and what I couldn't. He was incredibly nice and knew about the disease - he said that his brother has Celiac, and he understands what it's like to be glutened. They made my dinner from various items and he supervised all of it. It was wonderful!

Those are my stories....let's hear some others. We can complain about how insenstive people can be, so let's counteract those bad feelings and spread some stories that make you smile!

Funny how good things can make us cry. You have a wonderful teacher who not only helped you feel less left out but also took the opportunity to educate the rest of the class. Those are the kind of teachers we need. Thank you for posting this and thanks to the others that added their good stories. I wish I had one to add to it. Things are improving for us slowly but surely as this country opens it eyes.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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I'm an eleven grade student, and a few weeks ago, my teacher nearly made me cry. You see, at the beginning of the year, my religion teacher told us that she hates students that miss a lot of school. Last year, I missed close to 40 days of school due to gluten reactions, and because I'd only discovered my gluten issues at the end of May, I wasn't sure how often I would be glutened accidently, and therefore, how much I'd be absent this year. I was also determined not to let my gluten issues rule my life, and decided not to inform my teachers about my gluten intolerance. But since my religion teacher hates people who miss a ton of school, I felt like I had to explain about my gluten intolerance, and how it might affect my attendence. She was very sweet and understanding about it, and I felt better after informing her.

So it was a Friday when she said that she had a treat for the class, that she had cookies for everyone, and we could eat them while we watched a movie today. I was a bit disappointed, but hey, it's life, so I remained seated while my classmates got their cookies. Then, my teacher called me to come up to the front, and she pulled out a brand new bag of Mi-Del Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies. She searched specifically for something that I could have. I hugged right then and there, and thanked her. The entire class learned about gluten intolerance and they all tried a gluten-free cookie. It was a pretty awesome experience, and made me feel on top of the world. Today, it was cookie day again. I couldn't have cared less, as I still couldn't believe that she had gone through all that trouble the first time, but yet again, my teacher called me up. She handed me the leftover gluten-free Chocolate Chip Cookies, and a second bag of Mi-Del Gluten Free Ginger Snaps. I couldn't believe it. I thanked her profusely and ate my cookies :).

Sometimes an experience like that makes up for all the people who are rude, and uncaring.

Oh, and the other day, my family and I ate out at Kelsey's. The minute gluten - free left my mouth, the waitress left and returned with the manager, who talked me through the entire menu, explaining what I could have, and what I couldn't. He was incredibly nice and knew about the disease - he said that his brother has Celiac, and he understands what it's like to be glutened. They made my dinner from various items and he supervised all of it. It was wonderful!

Those are my stories....let's hear some others. We can complain about how insenstive people can be, so let's counteract those bad feelings and spread some stories that make you smile!

On my last birthday, two of my coworkers in my office split the cost of two bags of gluten free cake mix, and one of them baked a chocolate/vanilla cake with homemade chocolate frosting. The office manager suggested having something "regular", but the rest of my coworkers insisted that they would eat the gluten free cake. And they did. I really got kind of choked up; it was so supportive and sweet of everyone.

Also, a friend of mine just got married, and sent me a list of menu items that the caterer could make gluten free, so that they could prepare something special. I agree; people want to be supportive if they can.

Sheryll

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My 6yr old daughter, after watching her daddy make regular brownies, said, "Daddy, it isn't nice of you to make stuff that mommy can't have!" And then refused to eat the brownies until I told her it was okay because I had some gluten-free cookies that I could eat. She's such a sweetie!

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My favorite story is when I was eating at Ruby Tuesday's and I wanted to know if the artichoke dip (or whatever dip) was safe, and the poor waiter didn't know for sure, so he cut the ingredients off the box and brought it out to me at the table!


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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Thought I would bump this up and add my story . . .

Traditionally, in the cul-de-sac that I live on, we have a Halloween pitch-in. It's hot dogs, chips, a little fruit and veggies and cookies and such. Everybody eats and then the dads take the kids out trick-or-treating and the moms sit in the cul-de-sac and hand out candy. About 8 families participate.

My neighbor who usually coordinates asked me "So what do you want to do for Halloween this year"? I (being a smart alec) replied "Yes, let's do it, let's have Halloween"!

But she was talking about food. I had assumed we would do the same pitch-in that we always do and I would pack a lunch for my kids to keep them safe. My neighbor has decided that we would all go gluten free for the pitch-in. I loved her reasoning. She said she didn't want to have to keep track of who touched what and used what fork where. EXACTLY!!!! So we are planning on having walking tacos. :D


Janet

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.

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The day after I found out I had Celiac disease, I called a co-worker and friend and told him what I found out. He suggested we meet for a glass of wine and he'd bring some literature that would help me get up to speed. He had all kinds of great stuff - a Living Without Magazine, a guide to Gluten-free restuarants, lists of hidden ingredients that have gluten, etc. He filled my ears with great advice of what restuarants to go to, what to do at parties, where to shop, etc. I was nearly in tears - thanking him for the great info. As he left, he asked me to walk with him to his car. He opened the trunk and pulled out four grocery bags of his favorite gluten free products. WOW. I was speechless and so very appreciative. It was then I knew I was going to be ok .


RiverGirl

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The day after I found out I had Celiac disease, I called a co-worker and friend and told him what I found out. He suggested we meet for a glass of wine and he'd bring some literature that would help me get up to speed. He had all kinds of great stuff - a Living Without Magazine, a guide to Gluten-free restuarants, lists of hidden ingredients that have gluten, etc. He filled my ears with great advice of what restuarants to go to, what to do at parties, where to shop, etc. I was nearly in tears - thanking him for the great info. As he left, he asked me to walk with him to his car. He opened the trunk and pulled out four grocery bags of his favorite gluten free products. WOW. I was speechless and so very appreciative. It was then I knew I was going to be ok .

Holy cow, that's so awesome!

(Is this coworker maybe a lttle sweet on you? Just curious.....) :)


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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