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Robyn G

New Member- Supplements

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Hello. I am new to this forum and have been on a gluten free diet for 28 years. Thank you to whoever started this. It is a great idea. Even after being on the gluten free diet for so long, I still have digestive challenges a lot of the time and seem to be continually working on finding the correct balance for myself. I just today made an appt with a Naturopath of Functional Medicine and I will see if he can assist me. Where I am looking for input is with supplements. I recently discovered that taking L-Glutamine and Copper really helped my digestive process and that info came from Dr Lorna Vanderhagues Heathy Immunity book in the Celiac Disease section. I wonder what other nutrients people are taking because I feel I must be missing something. My biggest challlenge is that if I contract a cold/respiratory virus, I get really really sick. I take so many quality products for my immune system but still, if I am not ultra careful, I can contract a virus and if I do, it's a doozer. Maybe I am missing some element or mineral that would make my immunty better.

Thanks,

Robyn

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If fatigue is a problem for you, you might want to discuss L-carnitine with your doctor.

A recent study was published showing that it helps with fatigue in adults with Celiac Disease.

Dig Liver Dis. 2007 Oct;39(10):922-8. Epub 2007 Aug 10. Links

L-Carnitine in the treatment of fatigue in adult celiac disease patients: a pilot study.Ciacci C, Peluso G, Iannoni E, Siniscalchi M, Iovino P, Rispo A, Tortora R, Bucci C, Zingone F, Margarucci S, Calvani M.

Gastrointestinal Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. ciacci@unina.it

BACKGROUND: Fatigue is common in celiac disease. L-Carnitine blood levels are low in untreated celiac disease. L-Carnitine therapy was shown to improve muscular fatigue in several diseases. AIM: To evaluate the effect of L-carnitine treatment in fatigue in adult celiac patients. METHODS: Randomised double-blind versus placebo parallel study. Thirty celiac disease patients received 2 g daily, 180 days (L-carnitine group) and 30 were assigned to the placebo group (P group). The patients underwent clinical investigation and questionnaires (Scott-Huskisson Visual Analogue Scale for Asthenia, Verbal Scale for Asthenia, Zung Depression Scale, SF-36 Health Status Survey, EuroQoL). OCTN2 levels, the specific carnitine transporter, were detected in intestinal tissue. RESULTS: Fatigue measured by Scott-Huskisson Visual Analogue Scale for Asthenia was significantly reduced in the L-carnitine group compared with the placebo group (p=0.0021). OCTN2 was decreased in celiac patients when compared to normal subjects (-134.67% in jejunum), and increased after diet in both celiac disease treatments. The other scales used did not show any significant difference between the two celiac disease treatment groups. CONCLUSION: L-Carnitine therapy is safe and effective in ameliorating fatigue in celiac disease. Since L-carnitine is involved in muscle energy production its decreased absorption due to OCTN2 reduction might explain muscular symptoms in celiac disease patients. The diet-induced OCTN2 increase, improving carnitine absorption, might explain the L-carnitine treatment efficacy.

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Hi Robyn,

Are you taking any supplements besides the l-glutamine and copper?

For immunity/cold prevention, I've found that nothing works better than good old vitamin C. I take 2 grams per day, 1 g. with breakfast and 1g. dinner. It's also one of the most inexpensive supplements out there, but it pays to get a premium product: look for one that is buffered and sustained release. It is also good to get one that includes bioflavonoids. I use "C-1000" from NOW Products, and I recommend it.

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a good source of calcium, magnesium, and vit D3 is important (with a 2:1 ratio of Ca to Mg), as well as a B vit (like a B-50) and a good multi (with or without iron, depending on whether you tend to have enough, or not enough, and whether or not you're a frequent blood donor). regular exercise, ironically enough, at a moderate intensity, has been show to boost the immune system as well.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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You should be taking Probiotics. I recommend Natren Healthy Trinity. Great stuff.


Celiac Sprue

Multiple Food Allergies

Diagnosed June 2006

Stopped Eating June 2007

IV Nutrition: 6/27/07 - Present

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Thank you all for your input in supplements. I am taking most of those. I take a lot of really high quality supplements and they all make a difference for sure. I think the biggest factor may be routine. I find that if I can have a dietary and otherwise routine, including exercise, I seem to feel quite well and if it goes out the window then my system seems to get stressed and vulnerable. I know that the bowel and respiratory systems are closely linked and so maybe it is the upset in routine that throws my bowel and then my lungs into a state. I do take pro-biotics from Young Living and have also taken others. I never seem to notice much difference with any them. What would I notice? I take about 1000 mgs of Calcium Ascorbate a day om my morning smoothie. I guess I could take more. I'm not sure where to get L-Carnitine and how would my doctor know. Can they test for the levels of this?

Thanks again!

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Carnitine can be measured through bloodwork. Large lab companies, like Quest Diagnostics, can do it. It is not a prescription drug, so you could get it at a vitamin store, etc.

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Hello. I am new to this forum and have been on a gluten free diet for 28 years. Thank you to whoever started this. It is a great idea. Even after being on the gluten free diet for so long, I still have digestive challenges a lot of the time and seem to be continually working on finding the correct balance for myself. I just today made an appt with a Naturopath of Functional Medicine and I will see if he can assist me. Where I am looking for input is with supplements. I recently discovered that taking L-Glutamine and Copper really helped my digestive process and that info came from Dr Lorna Vanderhagues Heathy Immunity book in the Celiac Disease section. I wonder what other nutrients people are taking because I feel I must be missing something. My biggest challlenge is that if I contract a cold/respiratory virus, I get really really sick. I take so many quality products for my immune system but still, if I am not ultra careful, I can contract a virus and if I do, it's a doozer. Maybe I am missing some element or mineral that would make my immunty better.

Thanks,

Robyn

I'm working with a functional medicine doctor myself. I haven't received the test kits yet but they should arrive today. More than likely that approach will tell you what else you might need. I can't wait to figure out the rest of my story. Keep in mind that each of us are different so taking supplements that work for someone else may or may not work for you. That's why I am consulting with the FM doctor. I'm tired of guessing. Let us know how your tests go. I think it's a fascinating approach

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