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cloesb

Breat Feeding Vs Bottle

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Hi Everyone -

I was hoping some of you can help me. I'm pregnant w/ my second & I am the one with celiac. Luckily my daughter is fine (she's 6). I had no idea that I had celiac when she was born and hated breast feeding - so I pumped it out for 10 weeks then quit.

I really don't want to breast feed with the 2nd but the celiac doctor said it may help prevent the disease and to introduce crumbs at 4 months.

I guess my question is - for those of you with children with celiac. Did you breast feed, bottle feed? Do you think it made a difference?

I obviously want to do whats best for the baby but I can't explain the horror that I went through trying the first time. I really just want to enjoy it this time around.

Any thoughts would be helpful. Thanks!

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I'm not sure if breastfeeding my daughter helped or not (not sure how to figure that one out!). But I do know that the point when she started getting worse was after we weaned (weaned at 15 months and 18 months was the first pediatrician appointment that I voiced concerns about her health).

So far, the articles I've read have convinced me to breastfeed my third daughter until her second birthday (if possible).

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huge caveat: I have no kids, so this is all heresay. :)

I hear that each kid/pregnancy is different, so I'd think that you could try (trying not to place too heavy of an expectation on yourself) to breastfeed, and switch - as you did last time - if need be. Maybe it'll be different, maybe it won't, but you won't know until you try?

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I was breastfed and started showing symptoms of celiac shortly after weaning (age 2). My mom also waited until I was 1y/o until any wheat was introduced. Both of my kids were breastfed so far neither are celiac. I think my son shows some signs, but my ex won't consider it.

Under no circumstances would I give my child "crumbs" at 4 months, not only because of celiac but because wheat itself is such a high allergen. I would wait until at least 6-9 months of age, if you are going to try giving it to them. Just my opinion.

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I breastfed all three kids and didnt introduce most allergen foods until 1 yr and did them very carefully. I was bottle fed and developed severe 'allergies' to milk and wheat - since they were never tested then, i'm trying now to see if it was really celiac. My kids stopped gaining weight once i put them on wheat, and i'm starting to wonder if it was NOT a coincidence.

I was a member of 2 different La Leche Leagues, and they offer great suport if you are having trouble with breastfeeding. Many hospitals also have lactation specailists now. We dont just 'naturally' know how to breastfeed, and having some suport in figuring it out can make a lot of difference.

Note, i also am one of those crazies who took the baby to bed with me, so I could just roll over and nurse without having to get up and go to another room and pick up the baby and lay the baby back down . . you get a lot more sleep with the baby in bed . . .they move out eventually!

But the most imortant things are eating plenty, drinking plenty, resting plenty, and finding a good position and latch for you and your baby. Oh, and I slept on a towel for a long time too!!

You have to do what is best for you AND your baby - both of you. I would suggest trying to breastfeed, and trying to get all the help you can, and then quit if it still doesnt work for you.

And good luck with your pregnancy and your new addition!

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Hi Everyone -

I was hoping some of you can help me. I'm pregnant w/ my second & I am the one with celiac. Luckily my daughter is fine (she's 6). I had no idea that I had celiac when she was born and hated breast feeding - so I pumped it out for 10 weeks then quit.

I really don't want to breast feed with the 2nd but the celiac doctor said it may help prevent the disease and to introduce crumbs at 4 months.

I guess my question is - for those of you with children with celiac. Did you breast feed, bottle feed? Do you think it made a difference?

I obviously want to do whats best for the baby but I can't explain the horror that I went through trying the first time. I really just want to enjoy it this time around.

Any thoughts would be helpful. Thanks!

I developed celiac after I had breastfed both of my children, so I am not sure if I can offer any advice on that matter. However, I had a horrible time breastfeeding my first child because I just couldn't produce enough milk. With my second child breastfeeding was a breeze and I was able to keep at it until he was a year old. It was certainly more challenging with the second child because the first one was running around and wanted my attention when it was feeding time, but it was such a special time and I really liked the closeness of the bond created.

So, I guess my two-cents includes a reminder of how very different each child will be. Good luck and congratulations!

Terri

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The problem is there is you won't know if the baby will tolerate the formula's out there. They are all made from soy, or milk. My son didn't even tolerate the very expensive hypoallergenic kinds because he didn't tolerate dairy or soy in any form. Plus one of the ingredients was corn syrup and he doesn't tolerate corn. So when I did decide to wean him I went to the ND and explained my issues, and she gave me a recipe for a homemade goat formula. He did much better on this.

KNowing what I know now and didn't know then......if it were me I would breastfeed for as long as possible avoiding dairy, corn, soy, and gluten while doing so. And I would not introduce gluten until at least 2 years of age. I might introduce other grains such as rice earlier, but not gluten grains. I would use cloth diapers to avoid the lead and chlorine issue found in disposables.

If you have trouble producing there are herbs you can take to help with that. The name has slipped my mind at the moment! I am sure its on the La Leche League website somewhere :)

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I would give breastfeeding a good try for sure. I breastfed all 3 of mine and each one was different. By my 3rd I thought I was a pro but she was difficult and threw me for a loop. Had she been my first I wouldn't have continued through the tough part and would not have tried again with the other two. She had to be taught how to latch on properly and once she got it things were better. The other thing I wanted to say was if you had a milk supply problem, that would probably be better for you this time because you are probably healthier since being diagnosed.

As far as preventing the food allergies, I would think you would at least give them a better chance, and at least you can say you did everything you could. I read something I think it was in The Hidden Epidemic by Dr Peter Green that said that they did a study that found the rate of celiac disease went up dramaticaly when breastfeeding became less popular. He seems to think there is good evidence it helps to lessen that severity of the disease if not help prevent it.

I think if I were to have another child now that I know about this disease I would not only breastfeed but keep them gluten free (maybe even dairy free or lite) until age 3 because of the possiblity of autism being related to gluten intollerance and most "damage" to autistic kids is seen before that age. Speech is developed, personality is developed, and I would think their tollerance to certain allergins would be stronger as well.

Sorry to have gone on like I did. I don't feel real strong about many things but I do about breastfeeding. I hope if you do give it a shot that it is easier for you this time. Consider a Le Leche League meeting they are great support and I think most hospitals have one they can refer you to.

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Thank you for this - actually dr green is my doctor & I had a long conversation with him about this. He's the one that told me to breast feed and introduce crumbs at 4 months. I ended up reading a long research article that stated there is a small window between 4-6 months where the gut is fully formed and ready to accept new foods - but if you miss the window then you are back where you started....I love Dr. Green. SO I respect his decision about wheat crumbs at 4 months. Its just the breastfeeding that I'm worried about.

I do worry about autism as well & was going to ask him about it as it got closer...

Thank you though - I think I've decided to at least put in the effort & see what happens. I'll contact La Leche when its time for help b/c the hospital I delivered at was top notch except for the breast feeding help. They were aweful....La Leche here I come :)

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