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lpellegr

Let's Experiment

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Argh. Tried again today. Used one tsp. yeast instead of the recipe's 2 1/2 tsps. Stuck the bread in the oven after only about 15 min. resting/rising time, and it hadn't visibly risen at all.

Once again it rose to freakish heights in the oven, splitting every which where and finally collapsing - this time before I even got it out of the oven. (After checking it at 40 minutes, I left it for another 10 to see if it might set up better.)

I do NOT get this at all!

I'm using Lorka's famous Gluten Free Flax Bread recipe, this time w/o the flax, as I was hoping that it was the flax that gave the bread it's funny flavor. Nope; it's the bean flour, which is a pity because I know the bean flour does great things for the texture of the bread.

Not sure what I'll try next...

It rose to freakish heights because you didn't let it raise enough before putting it in the oven. The term oven spring comes to mind! LOL The yeast got warm and GREW rather quickly when you first put it. Next time take the amount of time it is supposed to rise and reduce that by 10 min or so but the dough has to be raised before you put it in the oven or it will poof up too much again.


~Barb

Gluten Free October 18, 2007

YIPPEE for Gluten free

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Argh. Tried again today. Used one tsp. yeast instead of the recipe's 2 1/2 tsps. Stuck the bread in the oven after only about 15 min. resting/rising time, and it hadn't visibly risen at all.

Once again it rose to freakish heights in the oven, splitting every which where and finally collapsing - this time before I even got it out of the oven. (After checking it at 40 minutes, I left it for another 10 to see if it might set up better.)

I do NOT get this at all!

I'm using Lorka's famous Gluten Free Flax Bread recipe, this time w/o the flax, as I was hoping that it was the flax that gave the bread it's funny flavor. Nope; it's the bean flour, which is a pity because I know the bean flour does great things for the texture of the bread.

Not sure what I'll try next...

From what I've read, flax has certain binding properties, so I'd leave that in next time.

As for bean flours tasting icky, I found that this is true for Bob's Red Mill. I believe it is due to the fact that they stone grind the beans. Apparently, the stone grinding method produces too much heat, damaging the oils in the beans. That basically means the flour is rancid right from the start. I purchase bean flours elsewhere and they do not smell bad, nor do they taste bad. In fact they are some of my favorites, now that I avoid Bob's.

Anyway, since gluten-free flours don't stretch like gluten-filled ones, I'm sure the bread cannot be risen as much without pulling apart inside, which would then lead to it falling upon cooling. So I guess the trick here is to become familiar with how much rising a particular recipe can withstand. Keep in mind also that the gas bubbles will expand from the heat of the oven. So I guess the bread needs to maintain enough integrity such that it stays up as the gas bubbles cool down.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Man, I thought making regular bread with all that kneading was an art! It had nothin' on the peculiarities and eccentricities of gluten-free bread. <_<

You are absolutely right!

I make mine in bread machine, but I mix up the water, egg, oil, salt in a large measuring cup. I use boiled water and do not mix the dry with wet ingredients until the "wet" measures about 105 degrees F. I used to go with 99 degrees F but I noticed it made a difference if I make the water warmer. Does anyone else measure the temperature of the liquid?


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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Sure. The menu on the left side of the page has some quickbread recipes. I'd take a look at both the bread section, and the muffin section.

My wife just purchased this book from QVC titled Encyclopedia of Kitchen Secrets by Dr. Myles H. Bader. I have a low tolerance for yeast so a substitute he mentioned in the book caught my eye. I haven't had time to test it out yet but Dr. Bader says you can use 1 teaspoon of baking soda mixed with 1 teaspoon of powdered Vitamin C as a yeast subsitute.


"The decisions we make dictate the life we live. To thine on self be true."

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Okay, so let it rise more so it won't rise so much. :blink: And go with the higher oven temp. And look for another bean flour. Although, I think it was, after all, the flax that the kids didn't like. They like this loaf better, even if it is horribly squashed. I know the flax adds a certain gumminess, but if the kids hate it, I need another solution. Other recipes have gelatin - maybe I'll try that.

I'm still rather paranoid about this. Earlier loaves that I did let rise still collapsed, so it's clearly a matter of finding that ideal level. Or something.

And, yes, I do generally check my liquid temp before I throw it in, and shoot for 100-110. Not too fussy. I do wonder how slowing things down by using cooler liquids might affect things. Worked great for "real" bread, but clearly I can't infer much from the old rules. In any case, I'm not ready to take that step yet.

And I have no idea whether using baking soda and vitamin C would work. I do know that with wheat breads, soda bread was a very different thing from yeast bread. However, since gluten-free bread is already a very different thing, maybe the soda would work. But I'm not ready to go there, yet, either!

Thanks everybody!

Beth

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My wife just purchased this book from QVC titled Encyclopedia of Kitchen Secrets by Dr. Myles H. Bader. I have a low tolerance for yeast so a substitute he mentioned in the book caught my eye. I haven't had time to test it out yet but Dr. Bader says you can use 1 teaspoon of baking soda mixed with 1 teaspoon of powdered Vitamin C as a yeast subsitute.

That's basically what baking powder is, only it uses a different type of acid, usually monocalcium phosphate or equivalent. There may be a possible difference in the duration of the fizz, but I haven't timed it. I did try baking soda and vitamin C, and it does work, but I didn't notice much difference between that and baking powder. I actually ran into this a day or two ago, but the recipe suggested much more baking soda than vitamin C.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Just in case any of you home bakers are thinking of trying this, I'm getting repeatedly good results from using 1t of yeast whenever 1 packet or 2-1/4 t are called for. I let it rise just to the top of the pan, which takes a little longer than if you used more, and it doesn't over rise in the oven. I may even get sandwiches out of today's loaves!


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

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