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pixiegirl

Info On Celiac In Regards To Moods, Brain Fog Etc

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For my daughter's science class they all have to do a big huge project on a genetic disease and of course she choose Celiac. (she has it too).

We have found lots of good info of course but her science teacher told her Celiac doesn't really effect things like mood etc (in a pre meeting the project is just in the early stages), that's its really only a physical disease. Well we all know its not.

However we need this info to come from a reliable source... I've gone to mayo clinic and some other typical medical web sites and they hardly address the non physical symptoms of Celiac. Does anyone know of a good source that talks about the depression, brain fog and other cognitive issues of this disease?

Thanks for any leads you have!!

Susan

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


For my daughter's science class they all have to do a big huge project on a genetic disease and of course she choose Celiac. (she has it too).

We have found lots of good info of course but her science teacher told her Celiac doesn't really effect things like mood etc (in a pre meeting the project is just in the early stages), that's its really only a physical disease. Well we all know its not.

However we need this info to come from a reliable source... I've gone to mayo clinic and some other typical medical web sites and they hardly address the non physical symptoms of Celiac. Does anyone know of a good source that talks about the depression, brain fog and other cognitive issues of this disease?

Thanks for any leads you have!!

Susan

"A good source" besides this forum??? :lol:

Seriously, if there is no "accepted" literature, perhaps your daughter could do enough interviews asking the right questions and write a good enough paper that it could become "accepted" literature.

This web page has a list of other places to look for more information.

http://glutenfreeinsd.com/about_celiac.html


Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.

"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .

"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)

The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

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Br J Gen Pract. 2007 Aug;57(541):636-42.

Erratum in:

Br J Gen Pract. 2007 Sep;57(542):748.

A case-control study of presentations in general practice before diagnosis of coeliac disease.

Cannings-John R, Butler CC, Prout H, Owen D, Williams D, Hood K, Crimmins R, Swift G.

Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Centre for Health Sciences Research, Cardiff University, Cardiff. canningsrl@cardiff.ac.uk

BACKGROUND: Delay in the diagnosis of coeliac disease prolongs morbidity and may increase mortality. Little is known about presentations in general practice that may predict a subsequent diagnosis of coeliac disease. AIM: To examine presentations in general practice during the 5 years prior to diagnosis of coeliac disease. DESIGN OF STUDY: A case-control study with each biopsy-proven coeliac disease case matched by age, sex, and general practice to an average of two controls. SETTING: Thirty-seven general practices in south-east Wales. METHOD: Cases were identified via a secondary care clinic and controls recruited from the general practices of cases. General practice clinical records of both cases and controls were analysed to determine frequency of consultations, presenting symptoms, diagnoses, referrals, and investigations during the 5 years prior to diagnosis. RESULTS: Cases (n = 68) had an increased number of consultations compared with controls (n = 160) during the 5 years prior to diagnosis (mean difference five consultations, P = 0.001). Three clinical features were independently associated with subsequent diagnosis of coeliac disease: depression and/or anxiety (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1 to 5.7, P = 0.031); diarrhoea (OR = 4.5, 95% CI = 2.0 to 10.0, P <0.001); and anaemia (OR = 26.3, 95% CI = 5.7 to 120.6, P <0.001). Both diarrhoea and anaemia remained associated even when data for the year prior to diagnosis was excluded from the analysis. CONCLUSION: GPs should consider testing for coeliac disease when patients present often, especially with diarrhoea and/or who are discovered to be anaemic. Further research is required to clarify the role of depression and/or anxiety in the diagnosis of coeliac disease.

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J Affect Disord. 2007 Apr;99(1-3):117-26. Epub 2006 Oct 6. Links

Coeliac disease and risk of mood disorders--a general population-based cohort study.Ludvigsson JF, Reutfors J, Osby U, Ekbom A, Montgomery SM.

Department of Paediatrics, Orebro University Hospital, Sweden. jonasludvigsson@yahoo.com

BACKGROUND: Earlier research has indicated a positive association between coeliac disease (celiac disease) and some mental disorders. Studies on celiac disease and depression have inconsistent findings and we know of no study of celiac disease and the risk of bipolar disorder (BD). METHODS: We used Cox regression to investigate the risk of subsequent mood disorders (MD); depression and BD in 13,776 individuals with celiac disease and 66,815 age- and sex-matched reference individuals in a general population-based cohort study in Sweden. We also studied the association between prior MD and celiac disease through conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: celiac disease was associated with an increased risk of subsequent depression (Hazard ratio (HR)=1.8; 95% CI=1.6-2.2; p<0.001, based on 181 positive events in individuals with celiac disease and 529 positive events in reference individuals). celiac disease was not associated with subsequent BD (HR=1.1; 95% CI=0.7-1.7; p=0.779, based on 22 and 99 positive events). Individuals with prior depression (OR=2.3; 95% CI=2.0-2.8; p<0.001) or prior BD (OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.2-2.3; p=0.001) were at increased risk of a subsequent diagnosis of celiac disease. LIMITATIONS: Study participants with celiac disease and MD may have more severe disease than the average patient with these disorders since they were identified through a hospital-based register. CONCLUSIONS: celiac disease is positively associated with subsequent depression. The risk increase for celiac disease in individuals with prior depression and BD may be due to screening for celiac disease among those with MD.

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Am J Gastroenterol. 1999 Mar;94(3):839-43.Links

Depression in adult untreated celiac subjects: diagnosis by the pediatrician.Corvaglia L, Catamo R, Pepe G, Lazzari R, Corvaglia E.

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, St. Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy.

Untreated celiac disease can lead to serious behavioral disorders. We describe three adult patients with undiagnosed or untreated celiac disease without particular intestinal signs, causing persistent depressive symptoms in three of the parents of our pediatric patients. In two of the three cases, the pediatrician suspected the diagnosis when taking the family history of the children. In fact, a diagnosis of celiac disease was made during childhood, when they had intestinal symptoms, but the gluten-free diet was spontaneously interrupted during the teenage period because of the disappearance of the typical intestinal signs. In the third case the mother was tested for antiendomysium antibodies (EmA), as she had a diagnosed celiac child. In all three patients, the depressive symptoms improved quickly with a gluten-free diet. In conclusion, celiac disease should be taken into consideration in the presence of behavioral and depressive disorders, particularly if they are not responsive to the usual antidepressive therapy.

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Hepatogastroenterology. 1996 Nov-Dec;43(12):1513-7.Links

Anxiety and depression in adult untreated celiac subjects and in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease: a personality "trait" or a reactive illness?Addolorato G, Stefanini gluten-free, Capristo E, Caputo F, Gasbarrini A, Gasbarrini G.

Institute of Internal Medicine, Universita' Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome.

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Psychiatric illness and psychological behavioral pathologies may be present in celiac disease and in IBD patients. In these subjects anxiety and depression could be a main cause in the reduction of the compliance to the treatment. Aim of our study was to carry out a psychometric evaluation using appropriate means to determine the level of anxiety and depression and to distinguish between "state" and "trait" forms. The correction of such disturbances would improve the quality of life and the patients' compliance to treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen adult celiac patients, 16 subjects affected by IBD and 16 healthy control subjects matched for sex, residence and marital status were studied by psychological assessment. All the subjects were given the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Ipat Depression Scale Questionnaire. RESULTS: State anxiety was present in a higher percentage of celiac subjects and in the patients affected by IBD with respect to the healthy controls. Anxiety as a trait was present in a similar percentage in all the subjects evaluated. Depressive syndrome was present in a percentage of celiac patients statistically superior versus the healthy control group (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Our results shown that anxiety is present as a "reactive" form and personality trait anxiety has no effect in celiac and IBD patients. As regard depression, our data confirm a possible linkage between brain functions and malabsorption.

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Here's an article I came across when doing some research for a family member suffering from depression--

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10086676


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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From the NIH Consensus Statement: http://consensus.nih.gov/2004/2004CeliacDisease118html.htm

"In addition, a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions such as depression, anxiety, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, epilepsy with or without cerebral calcifications, and migraine headaches have been reported in individuals with celiac disease."

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In addition to the articles that were posted suggest to her that she put the words neurological and and celiac in a search engine. Lots will come up.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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