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cdog7

celiac disease Affecting My Career

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Ok, so probably the last place I'd ever want to cause drama or attract negative attention is at work. Unfortunately, because of my illness, I've missed a lot of work and been late much more often this year. The absences were mostly from before I had any idea what might be wrong with me, and really thought I was just getting the flu over and over. Being late is just from dealing with the intense lethargy/fatigue on top of repeated D episodes in the morning.

I'm still trying to get a Dx. This is actually a major reason why, so I can show something 'real' to my boss to explain. I don't think the managers really believe I am that sick

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Once your diagnosed and on the diet it shouldn't be as much of an issue anymore. When I was still working and not yet diagnosed I generally got up 3 hours early because I knew that was how long it would take my system to 'clear out'. Then I would take an Immodium dose and go to work. Not a pleasant way to live but it enabled me to keep my job.

You say you waiting on a diagnosis, have you had tests and are waiting for the results? If you have done all the testing then go ahead and begin the diet. You may know the answer before you go to the return appointment. If you have not had blood and biopsy done, and you want to, do not go gluten free until the tests are done. Even being gluten light can effect them. They have a high rate of false negatives also so after your tests are done try the diet no matter what the results.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Once your diagnosed and on the diet it shouldn't be as much of an issue anymore. When I was still working and not yet diagnosed I generally got up 3 hours early because I knew that was how long it would take my system to 'clear out'. Then I would take an Immodium dose and go to work. Not a pleasant way to live but it enabled me to keep my job.

You say you waiting on a diagnosis, have you had tests and are waiting for the results? If you have done all the testing then go ahead and begin the diet. You may know the answer before you go to the return appointment. If you have not had blood and biopsy done, and you want to, do not go gluten free until the tests are done. Even being gluten light can effect them. They have a high rate of false negatives also so after your tests are done try the diet no matter what the results.

I'm still waiting to actually get the tests! I definitely plan to go gluten-free as soon as I get them. I had the blood test already, but it was supposedly negative. However, I really don't trust the doctor that did it and am not sure that his nurses knew what the heck they were doing (I think he just had them take my blood to shut me up). Bad experience! I'm seeing a new doctor next week, and I'm insisting on a GI referral whether or not I get the blood test redone.

I haven't gone gluten-free yet, though I've been in such bad shape that I've reduced the amount of gluten I'm eating a bit. I felt like I was barely functioning otherwise. But for now I'm trying to eat at least one glutenous meal a day, sometimes two. Last night I had regular mac & cheese, and whoa

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Could you get an enterolab diagnosis and then go gluten-free? I hate for you to be making yourself sick for much longer for the possibility of a positive test when you know it's the gluten. I'm sure this is covered under some disability/medical leave act. You might want to talk to HR or a lawyer about your legal rights. You should not be docked for a medical issue.


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

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I'm still waiting to actually get the tests! I definitely plan to go gluten-free as soon as I get them. I had the blood test already, but it was supposedly negative. However, I really don't trust the doctor that did it and am not sure that his nurses knew what the heck they were doing (I think he just had them take my blood to shut me up). Bad experience! I'm seeing a new doctor next week, and I'm insisting on a GI referral whether or not I get the blood test redone.

I haven't gone gluten-free yet, though I've been in such bad shape that I've reduced the amount of gluten I'm eating a bit. I felt like I was barely functioning otherwise. But for now I'm trying to eat at least one glutenous meal a day, sometimes two. Last night I had regular mac & cheese, and whoa


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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I would say that you don't have to prove anything. Just tell them that you've discovered that you have food allergies that were making you very ill. Now that you realize this you should, with time, return to your normal health. Thank them for their patience in seeing you through this period of illness, and then don't say another word about it.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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Guest digmom1014

I did not have further testing done-I went gluten-free and in about three days I could feel a difference. How about if you took the Entrolab stool sample test (pre-gluten-free) and then went gluten-free over the weekend? By Monday you would feel a great difference. That way you could have your "proof" and also feel better sooner.

I feel for your situation-it's hard not having people believe you.

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don't just talk to them about what you think is wrong, but how you're going to find a solution to no longer have it affect your work. they may kinda care about you, but they really care about the work you need to get done.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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cdog7, you sound like you work in the same kind of place where I used to work! I really felt sorry for those who were sick or who cared for loved ones who were sick - or old.

Even though you may be able to document a valid illness, you have established yourself as "high maintenance" and a bother. You are probably expected to show up dead or alive and not cause problems either way.

I agree with getting the Enterolab tests done and then start the diet ASAP. Take in any documentation you can. Utilize FMLA if at all possible. (That's the Family Medical Leave Act - a misnomer if there ever was one, but that's another rant. It does, however, prevent any disciplinary action from being taken because of your illness.) ;)

I personally find it sad when managers are not able to distinguish the truly ill from the malingerers. I worked for and with such managers and there are no words to express how glad I am to be out of there.

Hope you feel better soon.


Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.

"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .

"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)

The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

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sometimes what goes around comes around ;)

I worked for a hard-boiled place twenty years ago and my co worker was deathly sick with ulcers. She was in training at work - but was out so much she was losing the momentum of the trainnig -- but yet to the doctors was not sick enough for Disability. She was put on "warning" about her attendance and the next thing she new she was fired. The jerk who fired her was a cold-hearted SOB and he was the owner's "puppet." He could have said to the owners (he was personal friends with the owners - that's how he got his job), he could have told them " this lady is really sick" (she was about 48 years old at the time). But instead he recommended firing her. We were a small family owned business office of about 10 people.

Several years later this SOB had a massive heart attack at home (he was still an employee of this company) and his wonderful friends (owners) FIRED HIM! So justice was served in that case.

I followed up with my ex-coworker and found that all those years ago she had H-Pylori uclers which were not under control until years later when medical science discovered that they needed treatment with anti-biotics. The treatment worked and she was doing better.

In her case, I not only fault the employer, but the gastro as well who would not put her on disability as that would have saved her the job and the stress and it was a fact that her health was bad and getting in the way of holding onto a job. Isn't that what disability is for? Doctors act as if Disability doesn't exist.


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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sometimes what goes around comes around ;)

Several years later this SOB had a massive heart attack at home (he was still an employee of this company) and his wonderful friends (owners) FIRED HIM! So justice was served in that case.

That explains why they were friends - birds of a feather. How sad.

I followed up with my ex-coworker and found that all those years ago she had H-Pylori uclers which were not under control until years later when medical science discovered that they needed treatment with anti-biotics. The treatment worked and she was doing better.

In her case, I not only fault the employer, but the gastro as well who would not put her on disability as that would have saved her the job and the stress and it was a fact that her health was bad and getting in the way of holding onto a job. Isn't that what disability is for? Doctors act as if Disability doesn't exist.

Your co-worker was probably better off not working there anyway. It probably did not seem that way at the time, of course! Too bad the doctors forgot that their primary responsibility is the health of the patient.


Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.

"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .

"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)

The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

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She needed the job as her husband left her and she had no income or marketable skills. She had been a housewife for 15 years and this situation made her ulcers come back worse. Unemployment didn't pay enough to purchase health insurance - at least with disability she could have gone on state Medicad until she got some of her health back and could get another job. The unemployment was also very low amount because she didn't work in those 15 years and they based it on a minimum. This woman felt like she had nothing to live for at this point. She was in her mid forties with no income, no money in bank, no skills, no resources and an ex-husband out of work (who used drugs to boot) and two kids (18 and 19 years old) who were as self-centered as the father. To get by, she took in a roommate for about a year.


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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