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Wakeboarder

Sharing Pots & Pans?

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I was just diagnosed with Celiac and I am trying to sort what is ok for me and what is not. I think the word "overwhelming" would be an understatement. I was told by someone that I should not use any pots or pans that have previously held/cooked gluten becuase it can cross-contaminate the gluten-free food that I use. Even if the pots/pans have been thoroughly scrubbed or gone through the dishwasher, they said that the high heat used in cooking can cause minute amounts of gluten in the pan/pot to leech out and contaminate the food. This seems strange to me and so far in my research, albeit very limited, I haven't been able to find out anything about this. Has anyone heard about this before or had any personal experience with it? And if so, does it matter what kind of container you are using: ceramic vs. stainless steel vs. non-stick, etc?

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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Hi, and welcome to these boards. No, you won't have to replace all of your pots. Putting them through the dishwasher is not enough. Glass and stainless steel need to be scrubbed thouroughly, and they should be fine. Any scratched non-stick cookware needs replacing. Anything with tight corners needs replacing, because you aren't able to get in and get all the gluten out.

You absolutely need a new toaster, and a new colander (if yours is out of plastic).


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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If you own a fryer you'll have to get a new one and use it for gluten-free only.

You'll need a new toaster dedicated to gluten-free only or you can use the broiler of your oven if it is free of crumbs.

You can put cast iron in the oven on the self cleaning cycle, scrub it well and re-season it, then dedicate it to gluten-free only.


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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I was just diagnosed with Celiac and I am trying to sort what is ok for me and what is not. I think the word "overwhelming" would be an understatement. I was told by someone that I should not use any pots or pans that have previously held/cooked gluten becuase it can cross-contaminate the gluten-free food that I use. Even if the pots/pans have been thoroughly scrubbed or gone through the dishwasher, they said that the high heat used in cooking can cause minute amounts of gluten in the pan/pot to leech out and contaminate the food. This seems strange to me and so far in my research, albeit very limited, I haven't been able to find out anything about this. Has anyone heard about this before or had any personal experience with it? And if so, does it matter what kind of container you are using: ceramic vs. stainless steel vs. non-stick, etc?

Hi Wakeboarder,

Welcome to the "gluten free gang" so to speak. :)

As Ursa said you might be best to scrub the pots well. If the pans have tight corners, you will need to consider buying new ones.

I personally as yet, do not have my own toaster. I am just at the moment trying to get by with buying the stuff I need. I can't do it all at once. So, for the moment, I am just using the broiler feature on the oven, raising up one rack, and placing a fresh piece of tinfoil down. And using that as my toaster, Yes, you need to watch it more closely that way, flip sides so on. But, at least I know there's no gluten by accident on it.

If you have a dollar store near you. Go and get a bunch of plastic containers for storing all your gluten free foods and label it as "gluten free zone" plus name of food item. I bought about 10 of them in assorted sizes. For storing everything from rice pasta spaghtetti to taco corn chips. You can get a sifter from there, as well as even tin foil baking tins that you could use a couple of times, then toss away. Those types of things might hold you over till you can afford to buy new pots, baking ware, that is used for gluten free cooking.

Mini List for Dollar Store

Spaghetti Storage Container with lid (3) >they hold a lot 12 cups worth of food

Tall Rectangluar Container with lid (3) >for storing cereals, snack foods

Medium sized short rectangluar containers with lids (3) for storing things like cookies; and other goodies

Small sized round containers with lids (4) for storing home made single serving dinners that you freeze (just thaw out night before and put in bowl for reheating. (Not wise these days with all the plastic leaching scares to reheat in plastic.) :)

New colander for draining the rice pasta

New Flour Sifter

Plastic sqeeze bottles for items like mustrad, relish, ketchup, mayonaisse (to prevent cross contamination with gluten sources)

A brand new set of measuring cups and spoons

Wooden Spoons (marked gluten-free (gluten free) with a permanent marker on the handle

Tin Foil pans such as loaf pans and small baking pans (even nicer if they have lids to match) For making things like the bread and casseroles

Then, find a spot in your kitchen, even if its just a couple of shelves in cupboard, that are dedicated to "gluten free" only. I did that in my house. I took over 2 cupboards, one for storing my plastic bins, and cookware in (the bits I bought so far) as well as one dedicated to cupboard type foods. This way when I open that one cupboard, the only thing starring at me. Is gluten free :)

Temptation is the worst enemy (out of sight, out of mind ) :)

In your fridge, use one of the crispier drawers for storing your gluten free cold foods. Things like bread that gluten free, can be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. Otherwise freeze in 2 slices in baggies, that you just bring out as needed.

If you don't have a pair of silcone oven mitts, I'd get a pair of those too. Oven mitts (cloth ones) would be full of crumbs and other sources of gluten. Let's Face it, we don't always wash those every day. The silcone ones can be scrubbed, and put through the dishwasher.

As you say, overwhelming!!!!! and thats an understatement.

Just be glad there's dollar stores to ease up some of the costs :)

hugs


44 yr old mom, SAHM (stay at home; aka a Retro Mama :D , 2 special needs kids dd 15yrs ds 4 yrs

Follows Compassion Rules "Treat others; they way you wish to be treated"

blood test negative: celiac However, doctor felt other factors in blood works warranted trying the gluten-free diet

April 7/08 Doctor confirms gluten intolerance/ remain gluten-free for 2 more months; and repeat tests

Gluten free since March 4/2008 (other than accidently, or unknown gluten used--- its a learning process, Gluten is everywhere!)

"People are like stained-glassed windows. Best viewed in the light!" unknown author

"I am only as strong as the coffee I drink, and the hairspray I use" :)

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