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Redheadmom116

Help! Newly Diagnosed

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I was just diagnosed and I am having a real hard time understanding what I can or can't eat. I sat in the lunchroom with all my co-workers watching them eat doughnuts and cookies and other things like that I had to leave. Just like one of the prior post said- I feel like a freak. I know that eating that stuff will make me miserable but I'm just so frustrated!! :angry: I was referred to a dietician by my doctor but my insurance won't pay for the sessions. I feel so alone- I know that I have this forum and other places on the internet to look for information but it's not like sitting down with someone face to face and having them explain it to you. Sorry to be sounding like such a baby but I kind of feel that way. This is all new.

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Welcome to the board. I think you will find there is a lot of support and info here. Have you checked to see if there is a celiac support group close to you? That may help a bit. It can be hard to get used to the gluten-free life and for many in the beginning there is a bit of withdrawl and in a sense a greiving process that also comes into play. Rarely is it easy but it is so worth it.

One of the easiest ways to be gluten free in the beginning is to go with whole unprocessed foods as much as you can. Fresh meats, chicken, fish, fresh and single ingredient frozen veggies and fruits, plain rice, wild rice, potatoes and fresh herbs are all going to be gluten free. McCormick spices are pretty reliable in the single ingredient form You want to check all your supplements and OTC as well as prescription meds. Your pharmacist should note on your chart that you are celiac and all meds need to be checked. If your pharm seems annoyed by this do find another.

Many find the transition to cooking most of their own food tough at first. We have gotten so used to prepared convience that we forget that it is possible to make food with little effort. Many find a rice cooker and a crockpot to great additions to the kitchen.

Make sure you replace your toaster, cutting boards that have been used for gluten items and if you must have a mixed kitchen make sure you have your own condiments, pnut butter, jelly, mayo butter etc.

Please feel free to ask any question you need to and vent away if needed.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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If the dietician is very familiar with Celiac (our dietician is a Celiac) and you can afford to pay for it, I'd visit the dietician. If they are just going to give you the textbook info, don't bother. But we found our visit to be fantastic!

What I found to be the most helpful in our learning process was to make a list of all the meals/foods I knew how to make and then go through them one by one and see what I could still make with some modification, what I could make just being sure to use gluten free ingredients, and what had to be thrown out altogether. I was surprised that there wasn't anything I had to get rid of! I then used this to help plan meals for the week. I did that for a couple of months. Now it's just our way of life and is much easier.

It really helps to plan out the whole week's menu (at least it did for me). That way you can make your meals work together. For example, a roast and veggies for dinner one day easily becomes stew for the next day's lunch. Pancakes for breakfast make great fixings for PB&J sandwiches (excellent on pancakes!!). Quiche for dinner makes great leftover breakfast or lunch. Making rice as a side dish? Make extra and then use it for friend rice the next day for dinner or make that same night and use for lunches.

If you check out the recipe forum, there is someone who posts weekly menus. This is a great place to get ideas for both old and new Celiacs!

Don't feel like this is a terrible thing you have to live with. It's very doable. I pretty much follow the diet by choice. I know it is no where near the same thing as actually having to follow the diet, but I can tell you that I don't miss things. And on the rare occasions that I eat a gluten version of something that I remembered being really good, I am almost always dissatisfied with it and prefer our gluten free version. And in the cases where I don't prefer the gluten-free version, I can still say that there isn't anything gluten-free that I mind eating! And 100% guaranteed, we eat better tasting food and healthier food than we ever did before!

Welcome!!

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