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Peace41

Chicken And Gluten Intolerance

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I'd be curious to your reasoning as to why the yellow from the corn transfered and was deposited into the skin and fat and feathers, if it were indeed all broken down an eliminated.

I really wish I knew the answer to that question, although I know that a yellow dye is also added because the more of these dyes added, the yellower the egg yolks are. Funky stuff!

I wonder if you looked up beta carotene in humans if it might give some idea how it works? As I remember, a significant amount of beta carotene in our food will actually get our skins to turn an orange hue. I wonder if it has to do with the source for a particular vitamin or mineral, and how completely it's broken down before it is utilized by certain cells?

I have a question if Chickens eat grains, then wouldn't that grain affect eggs and their meat, wouldn't what they

consume go through them? Wouldn't the gluten go through to their eggs and be in their meat?

If an animal is fed genetically modified grains, then that does affect the meat, as some of these genetic modifications exist in some of the basic components our bodies use, and don't break down. That one creeped me out when I was reading about it. Ick. But that's not the gluten molecule itself. Far as I know, it breaks down into component parts to be used by the animal's cells and it's not an issue from that standpoint.

Re: eggs - I have known some exceedingly sensitive celiacs, and a few severe allergy sufferers, who do react to eggs that are fed their sensitive grains, but not eggs that are not fed their sensitive grains. I'm assuming a tiny bit might get into the egg, and I couldn't swear it's not cc, but these folks wash their stuff pretty well. However, for the vast majority of celiacs (or wheat allergic), I don't think this would be an issue.

I'd go with David_in_Seattle on the meat contamination issue - the way they defeather poultry is pretty well set up to slightly contaminated the poultry skin. Again. Ick. But also again, very slight cc, for many poultry.

Apparently Tyson adds antibiotic as well.

I am so glad you mentioned this! I had thought that chickens didn't usually GET antibiotics ever, so I haven't been asking this question anymore when I'm trying to find chicken to eat. But I have nasty allergies to antibiotics and the residue that remains in meat has made me have a reaction before. Thank you!


T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive

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I have always reacted to dairy and just thought that I had a dairy intolerance until I recently decided that maybe it's the grains in dairy that I'm reacting to. I've been eating grass fed dairy without any symptoms. We've been having issues with eggs so I'm on the lookout for some 100% free range eggs to test that theory.

Hey, me too! I am sensitive to very low levels of gluten, however. Good luck with the eggs. I had a source for awhile, they were pasture raised, but when winter came I started reacting to them because they got their wheat containing feed at that point. I found another source, but then started reacting to them too. I looked into it and found that they give them supplements to provide the extra calcium that all that egg laying requires. They had changed their supplement. My daughter thinks we should raise our own egg laying hens, but of course, I'd have to do all the work! This should really be in the super sensitive section. Please don't get mad at me, typical celiacs. This is for super sensitive celiacs only.

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I react to grain fed beef (and we're talking organic antibiotic and hormone free grain fed beef) I do not react to grass fed beef. I have always reacted to dairy and just thought that I had a dairy intolerance until I recently decided that maybe it's the grains in dairy that I'm reacting to. I've been eating grass fed dairy without any symptoms. We've been having issues with eggs so I'm on the lookout for some 100% free range eggs to test that theory. I have also read articles (sorry I don't have any on hand but will certainly post them when I can locate them) talking about how cows are not designed to eat grains, their guts are not able to digest them. This intolerance to grains causes leaky gut in the cow and allows food into the bloodstream that would not normally enter the blood stream. Dairy, if you think about it it totally makes sense. Babies everywhere are reacting to the gluten in a mother's diet, both my girls did. Would it not make perfect sense that we would react to dairy (a cow's breastmilk) in the same way. It would be really nice if there was some research done on all this but the lack of it is not going to stop me from listening to my body. And that's what I would encourage anyone to do, listen to your body.

We have been doing a lot of the same reading. In New Zealand I can eat regular beef, although I am gradually moving to organic as they are starting to feed our cattle and cows grain instead of them being pure free-range. In the U.S. I can eat only organic grass-fed beef. Since I am also a lectin intolerant I am not sure if it is the lectins or the gluten that gets me. I buy only organic free range eggs and chicken - so far have not reacted to dairy, thank goodness, but don't drink cow's milk and I bring my yogurt mixes to U.S. from N.Z. (grass fed to avoid too many lectins).

Hey, me too! I am sensitive to very low levels of gluten, however. Good luck with the eggs. I had a source for awhile, they were pasture raised, but when winter came I started reacting to them because they got their wheat containing feed at that point. I found another source, but then started reacting to them too. I looked into it and found that they give them supplements to provide the extra calcium that all that egg laying requires. They had changed their supplement. My daughter thinks we should raise our own egg laying hens, but of course, I'd have to do all the work! This should really be in the super sensitive section. Please don't get mad at me, typical celiacs. This is for super sensitive celiacs only.

Well, I don't consider myself to be a super sensitive but I have been thinking of raising hens too - my Swiss neighbour does and I often think of raiding her laying boxes :lol:

To the pp about beta carotene, I had often wondered why the organic U.S. egg yolks looked so anemic compared to our deep coloured N.Z. yolks, until I found out that our N.Z. layers are fed beta carotene for this very purpose :unsure:


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

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I don't feed my chickens beta carotene, but their eggs have beautiful dark yolks. It comes from eating greens (both veggie scraps and grass).


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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I don't feed my chickens beta carotene, but their eggs have beautiful dark yolks. It comes from eating greens (both veggie scraps and grass).

Yeah, that's the color ours used to be back in the chick-raising days on the farm. The beta carotene tricks you into thinking they are being fed greens I guess.


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

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Hey, me too! I am sensitive to very low levels of gluten, however. Good luck with the eggs. I had a source for awhile, they were pasture raised, but when winter came I started reacting to them because they got their wheat containing feed at that point. I found another source, but then started reacting to them too. I looked into it and found that they give them supplements to provide the extra calcium that all that egg laying requires. They had changed their supplement. My daughter thinks we should raise our own egg laying hens, but of course, I'd have to do all the work! This should really be in the super sensitive section. Please don't get mad at me, typical celiacs. This is for super sensitive celiacs only.

Thanks :) All the local farms I've contacted so far supplement their pastured hens with grains. One farm I emailed though did say theirs was a non GMO feed that they gave their chickens, so it may be worth trying. I have definitely thought about having our own chickens!


Proud breastfeeding, toddlerwearing, part time cosleeping, stay at home mom. Positive for two copies of DQ8, negative celiac panel after 3 month gluten challenge; biopsy showed gastritis, inflammation in the esophagus, and hiatial hernia but no signs of celiac. Possible DH. Gluten free as of 3/11/2011

ODD 3 1/2, positive for DQ8 and DQ6, negative celiac panel after 3 month gluten challenge. Gluten free as of 3/10/2011

YDD 2, no testing. Positive for DQ8 and DQ6. Possible DH. Gluten free as of 3/10/2011

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