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Gluten Free Grains Tested Postive For Gluten

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Thats a great article. I guess I always thought in the back of my mind this could of course happen, but to read that samples analyzed actually had enough of an amount to make celiacs sick is upsetting. Is this true for rice as well?

thanks for posting

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Thats a great article. I guess I always thought in the back of my mind this could of course happen, but to read that samples analyzed actually had enough of an amount to make celiacs sick is upsetting. Is this true for rice as well?

thanks for posting

this is just depressing. We are fighting something we cannot see and this is frustrating. I feel like I cannot trust anything or anyone but me right now. I miss eating without worrying...

I finally found Bob's Red Mill Gluten free oats. If anyone has any objections or advice on this let me know. I am only gluten free for 1 month and I am getting tired of Rice Chex for b'fast. I can't seem to tolerate anything with corn in it so my cereal choices are limited...

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Thats a great article. I guess I always thought in the back of my mind this could of course happen, but to read that samples analyzed actually had enough of an amount to make celiacs sick is upsetting. Is this true for rice as well?

thanks for posting

Released for publication June 1, 2010

Gluten Contamination of Grains, Seeds, and Flours in the United States: A Pilot Study. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010;110:937-940).

What follows is a summary of study findings.

In the FDA

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Well, on the bright side they only mention one whole grain in that list while all the other's are flours which means it's most likely that the contamination is occurring during the milling process. The whole grain was Millet, so looks like that one's another thing to add to the oat list.

Smith: they found 1 rice flour that had gluten in it but it was at 8.5 ppm which means technically it's gluten-free, they tested an additional rice flour that did not measure any gluten and they tested a number of rice grains that did not measure any gluten.

Quincy: You should just give up on grains for breakfast, heavy fats are much healthier for you to eat in the morning than any grains. Go with bacon and eggs or milk (whole fat) and a veggie or two. This will provide you with a much longer lasting steady stream of energy for the rest of your morning as well as priming your body for proper fat metabolism for the whole day.

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Well, on the bright side they only mention one whole grain in that list while all the other's are flours which means it's most likely that the contamination is occurring during the milling process. The whole grain was Millet, so looks like that one's another thing to add to the oat list.

Smith: they found 1 rice flour that had gluten in it but it was at 8.5 ppm which means technically it's gluten-free, they tested an additional rice flour that did not measure any gluten and they tested a number of rice grains that did not measure any gluten.

Quincy: You should just give up on grains for breakfast, heavy fats are much healthier for you to eat in the morning than any grains. Go with bacon and eggs or milk (whole fat) and a veggie or two. This will provide you with a much longer lasting steady stream of energy for the rest of your morning as well as priming your body for proper fat metabolism for the whole day.

thanks Wheat Chef, not sure what trac to take as my lipid ratio of HDL to LDL is competely inverted for the worse. My ldl is high and my hdl is very low, so not sure about eating high fats. I understand many are grain free completely.

I did a modified atkins diet about 10 years ago (I never ate cheese or bacon/eggs), but lean meats and veggies and oatmeal in the am and completely reversed my cholestrol numbers.

any further thoughts appreciated.

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Quincy-

One of the best ways to raise HDL is through exercise. I agree that a good shot of fat is important for breakfast, but go for avocado, fish, olive oil, or canola oil over animal fats most of the time.

Other possible breakfasts:

-salad (homemade olive oil dressing) with nuts and plenty of fruit OR hardboiled egg and other chopped veg

-beans... however you like them but with olive oil... with fruit or veg and milk

-fish and vegetables

-soup (honestly, I love leftover soup for breakfast. Clam chowder, black bean, lentil, even chicken vegetable would all be good.)

-avocado with tuna and fruit or veg

Ack. I've been eating millet for breakfast and lunch a lot. Guess I should do some research... but I can see how easily it could become contaminated in our silly food system.

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Consumption of cholesterol is not linked to heart disease, neither is animal fat. There were some poorly put together studies a while ago that started that whole scare which were denounced as being misleading by the alternative health movement and it wasn't until this year that mainstream journals finally started admitting studies showing the complete lack of correlation that had been assumed this whole time.

Whatever you do don't eat canola oil on purpose, lard is healthier than that one (but not lard with nitrites or rancid lard).

Saturated fats and heart disease

Red meat and heart disease

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Consumption of cholesterol is not linked to heart disease, neither is animal fat. There were some poorly put together studies a while ago that started that whole scare which were denounced as being misleading by the alternative health movement and it wasn't until this year that mainstream journals finally started admitting studies showing the complete lack of correlation that had been assumed this whole time.

Whatever you do don't eat canola oil on purpose, lard is healthier than that one (but not lard with nitrites or rancid lard).

Saturated fats and heart disease

Red meat and heart disease

thanks for the info. to confirm your point WheatChef, I had a lipid profile done before I knew I had celiacs in February. By the time I had my follow up panel done in late April, my numbers came down off their highs so that total cholesterol was below 200 for the first time I can remember. I was on a basic diet of filet mignon, chicken, eggs, potatoes, and bananas. so go figure that my LDL actually dropped by almost 30 points. I understand that free range meats are the best but am having a hard time finding them other than in the organic stores which cost a fortune.

I am hoping this gets better folks. The frequent trips to the bathroom are getting tiresome... some people complain the opposite. at least most of my trips have normal results with the rest being a bit messed up.

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Well, I guess that was a waste of a graduate degree... The mediterranean diet with lots of produce, mono-unsat fats, and small amounts of animal protein (much like the Okinawa diet) really is one of the best diet profiles in the world. ;-)

Honestly, I cannot endorse eating the vast majority of the animal products grown in the US. I don't recommend them partly because I cannot believe that human health does not depend on the health of the food animals we are consuming. It's not healthy these days, and the wider health and environmental impacts are horrifying.

For anyone not growing their own, or making a high five figure salary, it's not feasible to buy meat for three meals a day that meets the standard you would need for it to have a positive fat profile. Totally grass-fed (not grass-finished or grass-fed with grain-finish), just fine if your body tolerates it well and you eat a variety of cuts. Yes, those organ meats are pretty good for you.

Most of us can only afford it for once a week, at most. So we eat alternatives. Beans have lots of great nutrients, are cheap, easy to cook, and plenty of soluble fiber (like oatmeal).

If your total calories went down during a diet, that will also bring down blood lipids. So, yes, moderation in all. Cut out excess calories and trim down any "tummy fat" and that will help more than any tweaking with nutrient intake.

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Well, I guess that was a waste of a graduate degree... The mediterranean diet with lots of produce, mono-unsat fats, and small amounts of animal protein (much like the Okinawa diet) really is one of the best diet profiles in the world. ;-)

Honestly, I cannot endorse eating the vast majority of the animal products grown in the US. I don't recommend them partly because I cannot believe that human health does not depend on the health of the food animals we are consuming. It's not healthy these days, and the wider health and environmental impacts are horrifying.

For anyone not growing their own, or making a high five figure salary, it's not feasible to buy meat for three meals a day that meets the standard you would need for it to have a positive fat profile. Totally grass-fed (not grass-finished or grass-fed with grain-finish), just fine if your body tolerates it well and you eat a variety of cuts. Yes, those organ meats are pretty good for you.

Most of us can only afford it for once a week, at most. So we eat alternatives. Beans have lots of great nutrients, are cheap, easy to cook, and plenty of soluble fiber (like oatmeal).

If your total calories went down during a diet, that will also bring down blood lipids. So, yes, moderation in all. Cut out excess calories and trim down any "tummy fat" and that will help more than any tweaking with nutrient intake.

yes, thank you. so true. I am going to the library to check out the mediterranean diet book. I have been thinking that for awhile. I think it will be the best for me. If anyone reading has had success on it please chime in.

Thanks!!

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Okinowan's (sp?) eat a lot of pork and use animal fats for cooking. Mediterranean cuisines feature plenty of organ meats with ample amounts of fat and cholesterol. Yes the fat profiles of our grain fed animals are completely off balance but at this point the research points to the ratio being more important than the amounts meaning that if you are consuming the bountiful amounts of omega-6s in cheap meats you can easily offset this with fish oil supplementation (which is awesome).

One fantastic thing about the Cretan diet (where the Mediterranean diet specifically comes from) is the notion of replacing all of your polyunsaturated cooking oils with the monounsaturated cooking oil from olives.

The actual cause for the decrease in heart disease in the Crete/Greece area is most likely closely related to the relaxed work environment of those two regions, a relationship that has been found across almost all countries.

Crud... another thread hijacked.

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Thats a great article. I guess I always thought in the back of my mind this could of course happen, but to read that samples analyzed actually had enough of an amount to make celiacs sick is upsetting. Is this true for rice as well?

thanks for posting

After I saw the abstract of this article the other day, I decided my grains needed a little more research. I emailed Lundburg farms, and they test their products for gluten contamination (I don't know if they test their plain rice, though...) They did say they don't have much control over what happens before it gets to their factory, but are very strict within their factory. Probably one of the safer companies, though. Bob's Red Mill also tests for presence of gluten.

That being said, the companies that are aware and do test are the ones that will get my money, even though they're generally a bit more expensive.

I wish the article gave specifics - company names and products!

I hope the FDA is carefully considering their new rules. ...."Millet: a naturally gluten free food ...but not really if you're sensitive. Or if you're not sensitive and we weren't very careful. Whatever. Here's a coin to flip"

<_<

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Okinowan's (sp?) eat a lot of pork and use animal fats for cooking. Mediterranean cuisines feature plenty of organ meats with ample amounts of fat and cholesterol. Yes the fat profiles of our grain fed animals are completely off balance but at this point the research points to the ratio being more important than the amounts meaning that if you are consuming the bountiful amounts of omega-6s in cheap meats you can easily offset this with fish oil supplementation (which is awesome).

One fantastic thing about the Cretan diet (where the Mediterranean diet specifically comes from) is the notion of replacing all of your polyunsaturated cooking oils with the monounsaturated cooking oil from olives.

The actual cause for the decrease in heart disease in the Crete/Greece area is most likely closely related to the relaxed work environment of those two regions, a relationship that has been found across almost all countries.

Crud... another thread hijacked.

have you tried the coconut oil, cold pressed etc. not sure if the medium chain stuff is good. i have tried it recently and it made me sick, but then everything other than H20 or purple carrot juice makes me ill. soy milk yuk, coconut milk, yuk.

i am going to try bobs red mill gluten free oats and see the result. cautious though as contaminated oats and high grain cereals got me here in the first place...

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I absolutely love all coconut products. Coconut kefir is my go to drink when I want a delicious libation.

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