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naturegirl

Which Foods Ok For My Pre Elimination Diet Cleanse

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Hello all.

I have been gluten free for almost a year and dairy free for around 8 months... and although some things are better, I am still having many issues. I went to a recommended holistic doctor who suggested that I do an elimination diet, starting with 2 weeks of no carbohydrates or sugars whatsoever and then slowly reintroducing foods (1 every 3 days, in pure form, 2x/day, and keeping food diary).

I decided that I would like to start out with a REALLY 'no risk' list of foods (maybe this list just 2 weeks, or until symptoms subside). So I have been looking at various posts on here and tried to compile a list of foods that will work. I am also 'semi-vegetarian' in the sense that I only eat fish and sea-food - as I have been this way since about age 5, the dr didn't recommend introducing meat now, as apparently it will take some time for my body to produce the enzymes again.

I am going to try to buy a new pan (that has no possible gluten contamination - as I had not done that yet), new board and wooden utensils, and only use glass-ware (for transporting). I am wondering if I should start off cooking everything and maybe taking plenty of food around with me in a little cooler (in my car)!!! I am very worried about getting hungry as I need to eat regularly and get low blood sugar. Does anyone have a sense of whether it is easier on the digestive system to cook all veggies? There are hardly any 'snacky' things in my list, so I think that it is going to be tough. I am aiming to go all organic (although it is probably going to break the bank!!!).

I am mostly looking for anything in my current list that you think I should NOT eat for any reason for the first 2 weeks, when I am trying to be super safe and get my digestive inflammation settled and my immune system healthier (so anything 'inflammatory', difficult to digest, a common allergen, bad for candida...). THANK YOU VERY MUCH!

Here is my list:

MAIN VEGETABLES:

Alfalfa sprouts

Asparagus

Artichokes

Avocados

Endives

Beets

Carrots

Celery

Cucumber

Garlic

Green beans

Lettuce

Squash

Zucchini

OTHER VEGETABLES (harder to digest?, higher salicylates?):

(Bok choy)

(Broccoli)

(Brussels sprouts)

(Cabbage)

(Cauliflower)

(Celeriac)

(Chard)

(Collard greens)

(Kale)

(Spinach)

SPICES/CONDIMENTS:

Ginger

Parsley

Cilantro

Watercress

Celtic sea salt

PROTEIN:

Wild fresh/frozen fish (salmon, orange roughy, halibut, trout)

Sardines and Mackerel in olive oil or fish oil

Wild seafood (crab, lobster, clams, scallops)

OILS:

Olive oil

Safflower oil

Sunflower oil

Flaxseed oil

DRINKS:

Mountain water (from our local well)

Spring water (when in town)

Mint or ginger tea

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Hello all.

I have been gluten free for almost a year and dairy free for around 8 months... and although some things are better, I am still having many issues. I went to a recommended holistic doctor who suggested that I do an elimination diet, starting with 2 weeks of no carbohydrates or sugars whatsoever and then slowly reintroducing foods (1 every 3 days, in pure form, 2x/day, and keeping food diary).

I decided that I would like to start out with a REALLY 'no risk' list of foods (maybe this list just 2 weeks, or until symptoms subside). So I have been looking at various posts on here and tried to compile a list of foods that will work. I am also 'semi-vegetarian' in the sense that I only eat fish and sea-food - as I have been this way since about age 5, the dr didn't recommend introducing meat now, as apparently it will take some time for my body to produce the enzymes again.

I am going to try to buy a new pan (that has no possible gluten contamination - as I had not done that yet), new board and wooden utensils, and only use glass-ware (for transporting). I am wondering if I should start off cooking everything and maybe taking plenty of food around with me in a little cooler (in my car)!!! I am very worried about getting hungry as I need to eat regularly and get low blood sugar. Does anyone have a sense of whether it is easier on the digestive system to cook all veggies? There are hardly any 'snacky' things in my list, so I think that it is going to be tough. I am aiming to go all organic (although it is probably going to break the bank!!!).

I am mostly looking for anything in my current list that you think I should NOT eat for any reason for the first 2 weeks, when I am trying to be super safe and get my digestive inflammation settled and my immune system healthier (so anything 'inflammatory', difficult to digest, a common allergen, bad for candida...). THANK YOU VERY MUCH!

Here is my list:

MAIN VEGETABLES:

Alfalfa sprouts

Asparagus

Artichokes

Avocados

Endives

Beets

Carrots

Celery

Cucumber

Garlic

Green beans

Lettuce

Squash

Zucchini

OTHER VEGETABLES (harder to digest?, higher salicylates?):

(Bok choy)

(Broccoli)

(Brussels sprouts)

(Cabbage)

(Cauliflower)

(Celeriac)

(Chard)

(Collard greens)

(Kale)

(Spinach)

SPICES/CONDIMENTS:

Ginger

Parsley

Cilantro

Watercress

Celtic sea salt

PROTEIN:

Wild fresh/frozen fish (salmon, orange roughy, halibut, trout)

Sardines and Mackerel in olive oil or fish oil

Wild seafood (crab, lobster, clams, scallops)

OILS:

Olive oil

Safflower oil

Sunflower oil

Flaxseed oil

DRINKS:

Mountain water (from our local well)

Spring water (when in town)

Mint or ginger tea

The list looks pretty good. Everyone is different in what they tolerate; the things from your main list that I have had to eliminate are beets and beans.

Can you snack on almonds? If so they would be an emergency tide-me-over when you needed something pronto.

Of course, all the cruciferous vegetables are harder to digest; chard would perhaps be the easiest on the gut. Spinach has casein, I recently read on here, hard to believe and you should research yourself because I have not verified it. You could probably include coconut oil and grapeseed oil as your good guys; I would prefer both of those over sunflower and safflower.

No expert nutritionist here, just what works for me. Good luck with tracking down your culprits. It took me 2-1/2 years (and I keep finding them) - just recently ditched quinoa, but I should have known because it is high in lectins, which are a no-no for me.

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I'd leave the cruciferous veggies off the first two weeks. Some people find them hard to digest. The other thing I'd think about is avocado. People can be allergic to it.

Seafood is a big question mark to me. Fish and shellfish are VERY common allergens and I'm surprised your doctor is supporting an elimination diet that contains either. If I had to pick one as less troublesome, I'd go with finned fish and avoid the molluscs and shellfish.

The usual recommendation for elimination diets is lamb but I can understand not shocking your body. I wonder if you might be able to eat chicken or turkey breast instad of the fish, as it's fairly easy to digest and less commonly an allergen.

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The list looks pretty good. Everyone is different in what they tolerate; the things from your main list that I have had to eliminate are beets and beans.

Can you snack on almonds? If so they would be an emergency tide-me-over when you needed something pronto.

Of course, all the cruciferous vegetables are harder to digest; chard would perhaps be the easiest on the gut. Spinach has casein, I recently read on here, hard to believe and you should research yourself because I have not verified it. You could probably include coconut oil and grapeseed oil as your good guys; I would prefer both of those over sunflower and safflower.

No expert nutritionist here, just what works for me. Good luck with tracking down your culprits. It took me 2-1/2 years (and I keep finding them) - just recently ditched quinoa, but I should have known because it is high in lectins, which are a no-no for me.

Hi, I am presently doing a three week program which includes an elimination also.....looks pretty good, you might want to check out Dr. Alexandro Junger's cleanprogram.com. First you eliminate all dairy, beef, grapefruits/oranges and foods that cause inflamation or mucus in the body and foods that can cause most allergies..and of course anything with gluten/wheat etc...and NO sugar, however you can use agave nectar which is also low glycemic...there are great recipes on his site,shakes soup; you only eat one big meal a day preferrably at lunchtime.......but once you are on it for a day or so, you really are NOT hungry...so check it out!!! Annette

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I would definitely not introduce meat after not eating it for a long period immediately before an elimination diet. Even turkey or chicken. But, yes, be sure that fish is not a problem... maybe rotate it out for a couple of weeks after introducing your first alternate protein (eggs or lentils, maybe?). And maybe skip shellfish altogether.

Meat introductions can make you pretty uncomfortable and give you serious diarrhea, which defeats the point of the diet...

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I'd leave out the celery and carrots, cause they don't do me well. And celery is a major allergen in some countries.

For any canned fish check for soy, even if it says on the front label packed in olive oil etc..

Food Allergies: What You Need to Know

The eight foods identified by the law are:

1. Milk

2. Eggs

3. Fish (e.g., bass, flounder, cod)

4. Crustacean shellfish (e.g. crab, lobster, shrimp)

5. Tree nuts (e.g., almonds, walnuts, pecans)

6. Peanuts

7. Wheat

8. Soybeans

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Thanks to all of you for your advice.

It is the end of day four of this 'cleanse diet' of just organic veggies, olive oil and fish.

I feel somewhat better but also had a 'reaction' which involved a small white bump on my tongue (which I have seen others here describe as a reaction to gluten), feeling ok yesterday evening but waking this morning feeling very nauseous, no appetite, weak, pain in my stomach, bloated, swollen glands, sore throat... maybe glutened. I also had on the first day(sorry a bit gross!) a small amount of blood and mucus in my stools - but I have the impression that this is from previous inflammation rather than something in the diet (as I have had this before).

So far I have eaten salmon, cod, & halibut (all wild, no additives/color...) as far as protein. I cooked all the fish either in glassware (just bought - gluten-free), new cast iron pan, or aluminium foil. They all 'felt' OK but I am getting a bit sick of fish and it's only day 4!

As far as veggies, I have had carrots (baked, steamed or raw, a LOT - bit bored of them!), celery (baked, steamed & raw), fennel, zuchhini (baked & steamed), avocados (maybe I should cut these out but they feel ok), asparagus (baked), cucumber, spinach (fried in olive oil), cilantro, parsley, watercress.

I felt as though the spinach made my mouth 'hurt' slightly as I was eating it (at same time as cod). So I haven't eaten this since. Not sure if it would do anything else but since what you said, Mushroom, about the casein, I might just avoid it until my system is more calmed down.

As far as drinks, I have managed to only drink unfluoridited/unchlorinated 'mountain water' (from the tap at my house in the mtns) and mineral water. Ginger tea mostly (from cutting up fresh ginger) and vegetable 'broth' from steaming veggies. However, I did 'stray' and have a little loose leaf plain mate and two types of rooibos: honeybush (seemed ok) and lemon chiffon - which is when I got the tongue sore and the night before the reaction. I am suspicious that the tea may have gluten (barley?). The other possibility is that it is a reaction from kissing my boyfriend when he had had gluten (which I've seen other posts about).

Mushroom: Thanks for the tip about beets and beans. I have avoided them for now. I am trying to avoid nuts at first - as I have had question marks about them in the past. But I think that I will introduce them as soon as it feels like I am 'settled'.

Skylark and sb2178: Thanks for pointing that out about seafood. I'm avoiding it for now. I'm hoping to reintroduce eggs soon, as I would like to know whether fish might be a problem. I don't want to start eating chicken or turkey if I can help it - it's been so long, I don't like the smell or anything anymore!

Thanks again!

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I'd leave out the celery and carrots, cause they don't do me well. And celery is a major allergen in some countries.

For any canned fish check for soy, even if it says on the front label packed in olive oil etc..

Food Allergies: What You Need to Know

The eight foods identified by the law are:

1. Milk

2. Eggs

3. Fish (e.g., bass, flounder, cod)

4. Crustacean shellfish (e.g. crab, lobster, shrimp)

5. Tree nuts (e.g., almonds, walnuts, pecans)

6. Peanuts

7. Wheat

8. Soybeans

Thanks for that. If you don't mind me asking, what do carrots and celery do to you? I feel as though they are OK for me but who knows!?! It just sometimes feels as though there isn't much left to eat!

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Thanks for that. If you don't mind me asking, what do carrots and celery do to you? I feel as though they are OK for me but who knows!?! It just sometimes feels as though there isn't much left to eat!

They cause pain in my gut, which I don't need. All the usual, gas and bloating etc. They seem to cause irritation. I haven't tried them in a long time. Turnips bother me too. And nightshades, tomatoes, potatoes, peppers. They may not bother you at all though. We each have to determine our own bodies reactions. An elimination diet is a good way to go. It sounds like you still have something bothering you in your diet now. You may need to eliminate some of the items in your cleanse diet.

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If you have that much inflammation, you may want to stick to cooked vegetables. Not boiled to death, but cooking at least starts the process of breaking down all those delicious compounds and makes it a little easier on your body.

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