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Marc49

Another Bread Question

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I know this has been asked hundreds of times, but I am new to this, and obviously have different opinions than most of the other threads I have gone through.

I have tried every brand of bread I can find,.......I think it ALL stinks!!!

Products that I have used and consider ok are Udi's bagels, and Kinnikinnick English muffins. While those two products do not taste 'authentic' to me, they at least are edible and I can make a breakfast sandwich with either one as well.

On to purely bread.

Is there a product out there that tastes anything like regular bread?

Is there any that you do not have to toast, nuke, steam, etc. to be able to eat?

My other question is why are the slices sized like I would expect to be seen in a ladies tea-room for finger sandwiches?

I am a male,......this stuff stinks pure and simple! B)

All of it I have purchased has been dumped in the woods by my home for the animals to eat.

Is it possible to make bread yourself at home that tastes real,......or at least better than this garbage I have tried to date, and can you make a normal sized slice with it?

I am trying to inject a bit of humor, but what I have said is really how I feel. Most of the other products I have used are just fine, and I will adapt, but I have to believe there is a way around this lousy bread.

To clarify I guess I should say I have not eaten 'white' bread for years. My favorite was always rye, along with whole wheat, and some pumpernickel from time to time. I also liked Italian/French/Cuban breads from time to time in the white category but those were 'thin' deli loaves,......you folks know what I mean.

I am asking for the plain and simple truth here. While I never ate a large amount of bread, is there a way to replicate what I used to eat to any degree of authenticity, or am I simply fooling myself with the idea?

Eating rolled meat and cheese for lunch is getting old quick.

BTW,.......don't mention brown rice wraps for sandwiches. I make burritos a lot and I have already tried a number of options. They taste like a thin piece of leather to me even after being steamed. For my Mexican type dishes I have simply accepted hard corn taco/tortilla shells.

Do I sound like I am enjoying this? :rolleyes:

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Well, sorry to say that unless you make your own, the slices of the gluten free breads like Udi's etc. are small. I have no idea why. As far as a bread that tastes like reg. bread and it the same texture etc., I don't think that there is any.

I think the key to this is to think outside the box and have something other than sandwiches.

Personally, other than the Bisquick and Betty Crocker products, I think all of the gluten free baked goods tastes like crap.

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Q. why are the slices sized like I would expect to be seen in a ladies tea-room for finger sandwiches?

A. They are for ornamental purposes.

Q. Is it possible to make bread yourself at home that tastes real,......or at least better than this garbage I have tried to date, and can you make a normal sized slice with it?

A. Tastes real, yes. Tastes better, yes. Normal sized.... meh. Get used to eating two sandwiches. Many of the gluten free flours need to bake at different temperatures (lower) for longer periods of time than wheat flour, but then the center does not get done. Ever. Many people will just put the stuff in a smaller 8" x 4" pan and get it over with rather than trying to get a normal sized loaf to finish. Of course, if you successfully do make a hearty gluten free loaf of whole grains, you may find the thing is dense enough that two of the smaller slices is enough.

ALWAYS test your loaf by first tapping it on top, to see if it springs back, then sticking a clean table knife in it, and the knife should come out clean, not sticky. Then it's done. Otherwise, bake it longer. You may have to tip it out of the pan and finish baking it laid across the top of it, to get the crust to firm up. This is going to save you beaucoup bucks $ in gluten free flours.

Q. Favorite was always rye bread....

A. I like rye bread, too. I have been experimenting with flavors in a smaller version, pancake sized. By adding molasses, fresh grated orange or mandarin peel, cocoa powder, cumin, sweet spices such as cinnamon or cloves, anise, caraway seeds, and using flours like buckwheat (toasted kasha, then ground at home) in the mixture, I'm getting closer. See this thread for the pancake/flatbread recipe

I'm pretty sure a bread loaf made with some of this as the base, would work. This is a base recipe with potato/buckwheat which can be converted to a quick bread leavened with baking soda and vinegar, if desired, and flavored a bit to taste more like rye or pumpernickle http://www.grainfreeliving.com/breads/66-bread

There is also Lorka's bread, which can have different types of flours substituted in:

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Well, sorry to say that unless you make your own, the slices of the gluten free breads like Udi's etc. are small. I have no idea why. As far as a bread that tastes like reg. bread and it the same texture etc., I don't think that there is any.

I think the key to this is to think outside the box and have something other than sandwiches.

Personally, other than the Bisquick and Betty Crocker products, I think all of the gluten free baked goods tastes like crap.

Well I tried the gluten-free Bisquick for some biscuits. Thought they might be ok at first but when I ate one I thought I was going to choke from it sucking the moisture out of my throat.

They went to the animals as well.

Bread products seem to be the killer for us.

Most of the other stuff I have used for years is already gluten-free and I was glad to find that out.

I guess I will simply have to adjust to carrying around a dish of meat and veggies that have to be heated somehow for lunch. Not easy for me as I am always moving around.

Oh well,......it is what it is.

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Unfortunately trying to make gluten-free bread taste like "regular bread" is like trying to make apple juice with oranges. It ain't gonna happen.

As you stated adapt and move on. The gluten-free world has progressed in the last few years so keep an eye on what's out there. You never know when the mad scientist will spin gold from the straw.

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"Bisquick" is not gluten free baking. It's just rice flour and sugar in a box, with some recipes on the side.

It violates the gluten free "Rule of Three" - a baked good should contain at least 3 gluten free ingredients to have a prayer of tasting halfway decent.

Try Bette Hagman's Yogurt Quick Bread recipe variations, for example. There is both egg, yogurt, and bean flour for protein. Adding some almond or quinoa for a heartier mixture would make it more wheat like. A lot of people use flax.

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"Bisquick" is not gluten free baking. It's just rice flour and sugar in a box, with some recipes on the side.

It violates the gluten free "Rule of Three" - a baked good should contain at least 3 gluten free ingredients to have a prayer of tasting halfway decent.

Try Bette Hagman's Yogurt Quick Bread recipe variations, for example. There is both egg, yogurt, and bean flour for protein. Adding some almond or quinoa for a heartier mixture would make it more wheat like. A lot of people use flax.

Thanks for all of your info,......I will try it as soon as I get a chance.

I can't seem to figure out how some companies can make some great baked goods, but none IMHO seem to be able to do the bread thingy.

I am not much of a sweet eater, but I bought a package of Pamela's Products CC cookies last week.

To me they tasted every bit as good as any I have ever had.

Have patience with me, I am a newbie to this! ;)

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There are some products that I think are not exactly like wheat, but I would eat them if they weren't gluten-free and I could have anything I wanted. The frozen buckwheat waffles by Nature's Path, I think, are wonderful. There are others if you want the list.

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A regular sized loaf of gluten free bread would cost $25!

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A regular sized loaf of bluten free bread would cost $25!

Isn't that the truth! :lol::lol::lol:

Udi's does it for me in a desperate pinch but I have to be pretty desperate to eat bought bread products. I've been experimenting with my own and whilst it does not taste like the real thing by any stretch, it is loads better than bought. I teach gluten-free cooking/baking classes; if you are interested I could post a few recipes for you that seem to be almost ok! I experiment with about 15 kinds of flours as they all have different purposes and character. ;)

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I guess I'm a terrible person to give advice because I make gluten free Bisquick biscuits and like them and I like Udi's bread but what I did was to just not eat bread. For months. I tried one brand when I first went gluten-free, hated it and just gave up for awhile. By the time I tried Udi's my memories of what bread was supposed to taste like were faded so my expectations were lower. Now I love it! :)

Also I never liked baking wheat bread which only used one flour so I'm certainly not motivated to mix three or more. So knowing it's already made for me makes the taste a lot more acceptable.

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For bread, I was making Pamela's bread in a bread machine (which I thought was pretty okay, but nobody else really ate it unless they were gluten-free too). Then for Christmas I got the book Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day. There's only one chapter on gluten-free bread, but it's pretty amazing. You make dough when you have the time (I find it takes 30-40 minutes for me, with a kitchenaid mixer). It makes enough for 4 loaves of bread (I have been making the "crusty boule" recipe), and keeps in the fridge for up to a week. You can also make pizza with it (you just take a chunk of the dough out and roll it out). They also have a "Not-Quite-Rye" or something to that effect (can't remember the exact name off the top of my head) that you might like. You could check if they have it at the grocery store, but beware if it might have flour from all the whole-grain (gluten-heavy) recipes in the rest of the book!

The slices aren't huge (it's a boule) but they are hearty, and this is the first bread I've found where people who are not gluten-free enjoy it too!!

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Hey Love2Travel-

I for one would love to try your recipes.

I have hesitated for 6 months now in even trying to make bread.

I don't want to do all the trial and error I have been reading about.

It is daunting. :huh:

So post away! Or send me a PM! or start your own recipe section! :D

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Isn't that the truth! :lol::lol::lol:

Udi's does it for me in a desperate pinch but I have to be pretty desperate to eat bought bread products. I've been experimenting with my own and whilst it does not taste like the real thing by any stretch, it is loads better than bought. I teach gluten-free cooking/baking classes; if you are interested I could post a few recipes for you that seem to be almost ok! I experiment with about 15 kinds of flours as they all have different purposes and character. ;)

Yes, please :)

Also, any non-yeast bread recipes with amaranth flour? I love the taste of it.

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Hey Love2Travel-

I for one would love to try your recipes.

I have hesitated for 6 months now in even trying to make bread.

I don't want to do all the trial and error I have been reading about.

It is daunting. :huh:

So post away! Or send me a PM! or start your own recipe section! :D

It IS daunting, no doubt about it! :huh: BUT once you learn more about what flour does this and what flour does that it really helps. I try to keep up on the latest trends in food/cooking and like to always try new things. The first couple of loaves I made were, well, yucky. Dense, doughy and more like banana bread than yeast bread. But I'm learning more by trial and error (like you mentioned!!).

I've always made my own bread so that is a reason I am so determined to make a good loaf. Another reason is that I love food science. Yet another, of course, is that I want something that tastes good and sort of like I'm cheating (a little sneaky).

So, I will compile my best recipes and start posting away. It would be so gratifying to be able to help people, too, to learn that gluten-free baking can be pretty good. I've been pretty impressed with some cakes lately (and believe me, I am as analytical as they come - I rate my food on a scale out of 10 for example). I'm weird, I know! :lol:

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Yes, please :)

Also, any non-yeast bread recipes with amaranth flour? I love the taste of it.

Sure - I love amaranth! My new favourite is millet. I also like ivory teff.

BTW, I see you are an herb gardener. Me, too! Maybe we'll have to start a thread on that. I garden in Zone 1 so am pretty limited but it is amazing what DOES grow here if you are determined.

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Then for Christmas I got the book Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day. There's only one chapter on gluten-free bread, but it's pretty amazing. You make dough when you have the time (I find it takes 30-40 minutes for me, with a kitchenaid mixer). It makes enough for 4 loaves of bread (I have been making the "crusty boule" recipe), and keeps in the fridge for up to a week. You can also make pizza with it (you just take a chunk of the dough out and roll it out). They also have a "Not-Quite-Rye" or something to that effect (can't remember the exact name off the top of my head) that you might like. You could check if they have it at the grocery store, but beware if it might have flour from all the whole-grain (gluten-heavy) recipes in the rest of the book!

That sounds really, really good! I just googled it and wonder if this is the recipe for the crusty boule?

http://www.artisanbr...ive.com/?p=1396

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So, I will compile my best recipes and start posting away. It would be so gratifying to be able to help people, too, to learn that gluten-free baking can be pretty good.

As you can tell, some of us are kinda desperate! :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Sure - I love amaranth! My new favourite is millet. I also like ivory teff.

BTW, I see you are an herb gardener. Me, too! Maybe we'll have to start a thread on that. I garden in Zone 1 so am pretty limited but it is amazing what DOES grow here if you are determined.

Wonderful! I'm in zone 5. You probably have more perenials than I do. The most amazing pasta sauce is made with Greek oregano and thyme from right in my backyard! Do you harvest yours and freeze? I do. I'm all out of Greek oregano because of giving it away for gifts, but have a little thyme left. What are some of your favorites?

How is ivory teff different from just teff? I have some pretty tasteless teff flour in the fridge right now, lol. It was pretty good in Irish Soda Bread at Christmas, though. Maybe the raisins helped.

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As you can tell, some of us are kinda desperate! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Sylvia, I am officially making it a mission to help get people excited about making gluten-free bread and other yummy things if that is not too intrusive or presumptuous. I am making bagels this weekend. My next gluten-free cooking class includes 1 yeast bread, pastry dough and chocolate chip cookies so I am developing recipes for those. I also want to make great pizza crust and delicious fresh pasta. I can't let me pasta maker sit there not doing anything! :P

Last week I made orange cupcakes with orange buttercream swirled on top. They looked real and tasted real. They got very dry the next day, though, but the first day was good!

And I want the bread to be bigger than the tiny 1"x1" breads we resort to buying. :lol:

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Wonderful! I'm in zone 5. You probably have more perenials than I do. The most amazing pasta sauce is made with Greek oregano and thyme from right in my backyard! Do you harvest yours and freeze? I do. I'm all out of Greek oregano because of giving it away for gifts, but have a little thyme left. What are some of your favorites?

How is ivory teff different from just teff? I have some pretty tasteless teff flour in the fridge right now, lol. It was pretty good in Irish Soda Bread at Christmas, though. Maybe the raisins helped.

Oh, I love making tomato sauce! It's so gratifying to grow something and then cook with it. And eating it of course! :P

I grow mint, Greek oregano, chives, garlic chives, lemon balm, lemon verbena, thyme, lemon thyme, lavender, rosemary, sage, Italian parsley, cilantro, Thai basil, Genovese basil, chervil. My favourite things to make are lots of preserves (i.e. basil jelly, nectarine, bacon and caramelized jam with thyme), lemongrass syrup infused with rosemary, rosemary lemonade, several pestos, chutneys, salsas, lemon verbena panna cotta, granitas/sorbets/semi-freddos, shortbread with lavender, seasoning salt blends such as orange rosemary salt, seasoning blends and rubs, bouquet garnis. Love to use fresh herbs and whole spices in marinades, brines and so on. I also dry a few herbs but use most fresh. Oh, and mint sauce for lamb is a must! And flavoured vinegars such as apple mint, oils and compound butters (such as roasted garlic and lemon with chive).

When roasting chicken, duck, goose, etc. I love to slip herbs under the skin and put lemon halves in the cavity along with lots of herbs, onion, garlic, etc. Then I put halved lemons cut-side down in the roasting pan so it caramelizes and then squeeze that juice on top of the chicken when serving. Yum!! I'm starving... :P

I love to roast veg with fresh herbs and whole garlic cloves, too. Then I love to play with whole exotic spices (I have 80+ at last count) and roast and grind them myself. OK, hijacking thread. Sorry.

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Oh, I love making tomato sauce! It's so gratifying to grow something and then cook with it. And eating it of course! :P

I grow mint, Greek oregano, chives, garlic chives, lemon balm, lemon verbena, thyme, lemon thyme, lavender, rosemary, sage, Italian parsley, cilantro, Thai basil, Genovese basil, chervil. My favourite things to make are lots of preserves (i.e. basil jelly, nectarine, bacon and caramelized jam with thyme), lemongrass syrup infused with rosemary, rosemary lemonade, several pestos, chutneys, salsas, lemon verbena panna cotta, granitas/sorbets/semi-freddos, shortbread with lavender, seasoning salt blends such as orange rosemary salt, seasoning blends and rubs, bouquet garnis. Love to use fresh herbs and whole spices in marinades, brines and so on. I also dry a few herbs but use most fresh. Oh, and mint sauce for lamb is a must! And flavoured vinegars such as apple mint, oils and compound butters (such as roasted garlic and lemon with chive).

When roasting chicken, duck, goose, etc. I love to slip herbs under the skin and put lemon halves in the cavity along with lots of herbs, onion, garlic, etc. Then I put halved lemons cut-side down in the roasting pan so it caramelizes and then squeeze that juice on top of the chicken when serving. Yum!! I'm starving... :P

I love to roast veg with fresh herbs and whole garlic cloves, too. Then I love to play with whole exotic spices (I have 80+ at last count) and roast and grind them myself. OK, hijacking thread. Sorry.

Lavender shortbread! That sounds delicious. I have lavender. Hope to see the recipe for that. Also, chives. Dried some in the oven in the fall and cut in small pieces. Have used all winter on potatoes and various things. Very good.

So you grow your own garlic and onions? Hadn't thought about that. Had about 25 bell peppers last season though. Also, peppermint. Not sure what to do with mint. I made peppermint tea a few times.

Hum. Lavender shortbread. Cant wait for the recipe. Printed out your last post. Thanks for the great ideas!!!

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Sylvia, I am officially making it a mission to help get people excited about making gluten-free bread and other yummy things if that is not too intrusive or presumptuous. I am making bagels this weekend. My next gluten-free cooking class includes 1 yeast bread, pastry dough and chocolate chip cookies so I am developing recipes for those. I also want to make great pizza crust and delicious fresh pasta. I can't let me pasta maker sit there not doing anything! :P

Last week I made orange cupcakes with orange buttercream swirled on top. They looked real and tasted real. They got very dry the next day, though, but the first day was good!

And I want the bread to be bigger than the tiny 1"x1" breads we resort to buying. :lol:

I'm glad you're on this mission! And no, you're not being intrusive or presumptuous! I've tried several recipes for gluten-free breads, some good, some dreadful, mostly (but not always) edible. So I'm anxious to see what recipes you come up with. My greatest challenge is yeast breads. Surprisingly I didn't eat that much bread before going gluten-free, but now I like to experiment with it. I have to be careful though as I have regained some weight but don't want to gain more. Such a dilemma!

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I'm glad you're on this mission! And no, you're not being intrusive or presumptuous! I've tried several recipes for gluten-free breads, some good, some dreadful, mostly (but not always) edible. So I'm anxious to see what recipes you come up with. My greatest challenge is yeast breads. Surprisingly I didn't eat that much bread before going gluten-free, but now I like to experiment with it. I have to be careful though as I have regained some weight but don't want to gain more. Such a dilemma!

I've always loved bread but not as much as when I was on my gluten challenge and ate a lot of lovely, fabulous heavily-glutened bread. I, too, have unfortunately gained weight. You look nice and slim in your picture! Me? Not so much... :( I love to eat too much but mostly savoury stuff that is naturally gluten-free.

I'm with you on the gluten-free yeast breads. Some are so so, some downright nasty (as in making one cry) and the odd recipe is pretty good.

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Lavender shortbread! That sounds delicious. I have lavender. Hope to see the recipe for that. Also, chives. Dried some in the oven in the fall and cut in small pieces. Have used all winter on potatoes and various things. Very good.

So you grow your own garlic and onions? Hadn't thought about that. Had about 25 bell peppers last season though. Also, peppermint. Not sure what to do with mint. I made peppermint tea a few times.

Hum. Lavender shortbread. Cant wait for the recipe. Printed out your last post. Thanks for the great ideas!!!

I love lavender, too, in moderation. I make my own herbes de provence blend with lavender. In France many do not use lavender in the blend but I like it!! :D It has an affinity for pork and duck so sometimes I make a rub for those.

I use mint a lot in fresh salads with feta. Are you able to eat cheese? Grilled haloumi on the BBQ sprinkled with fresh mint and drizzled with olive oil is lovely. As I mentioned above I make mint sauce for lamb. I also make apple mint jelly. Torn fresh mint is wonderful on kebabs wrapped in lettuce leaves. It is also great in tziziki sauce. Great on grilled butternut squash rounds and zucchini. Have you tried Jamie Oliver's Japanese Cucumber recipe? It uses fresh cukes, other stuff and fresh mint. Mmmm...good if you are able to tolerate rice vinegar.

One of my favourite vinaigrettes also contains fresh mint - it's a sort of Greek inspired one with feta, fresh mint, fresh thyme, fresh basil, a bit of Dijon, grilled red onion, red wine vinegar, olive oil, S and P, garlic. If you're interested I'll post it.

What did you do with your peppers? Only two of mine got large enough to call bell peppers - it froze early.

Lavender Shortbread

*This is the real, thick shortbread you put in a round pan as opposed to cookies. Delicious.*

1 c cold unsalted butter, diced, plus 1 tsp softened butter

1/2 c superfine sugar (if you don't have it, just grind up some granulated sugar in a food processor or spice grinder)

1 1/2 cups AP gluten-free blend

1/2 cup rice flour (if not in your favourite blend; if so, use 2 cups AP flour)

1/2-3/4 tsp lavender

pinch fine sea salt

1/8 tsp fleur de sel or sel de gris, or even granulated sugar

lemon zest, optional (lovely, too)

Using the 1 tsp softened butter, lightly butter sides and bottom of an 8" or 9" round tin.

Combine cold butter and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer. Using the paddle attachment, mix on low speed 15 seconds. Add flour and a pinch of salt and and mix again until dough begins to come together, 3-5 minutes. (It may still look sort of powdery but once you knead it, it comes together.) Form into a ball and roll into circle. Place dought in tin, flattening to fill. Using a fork, prick dough all over, right through to the tin.

Refrigerate 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 300.

Sprinkle top with salt or sugar and place on a baking sheet. Bake until shortbread is just firm in the centre, about an hour.

Using a sharp knife, score into wedges. Let cool. When cold, remove and cut into wedges.

*Do you have a favourite AP gluten-free blend? If not let me know.*

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