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gluten free overseas

Gluten Free Pizza Tonight!

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Three times a charm! I finally made a good pizza crust... yeah!! And it's pretty darn good. My son ate a lot of it!

Here's the recipe in case anyone out there doesn't want to use a mix--it's really not hard to do it from scratch.

Dissolve a teaspoon sugar in 1 cup lukewarm water and a Tablespoon yeast

While the yeast is activating, butter (with a good bit of butter) two circle pans or one (small--European sized) sheet rectangle.

Preheat oven to 200 C/400 F

Whisk 1 1/2 C rice flour, 2/3 C potato flour, 1/2 polenta (I'm sure tapioca flour would sub if you can't eat corn), 1/4 C. corn starch, 1 1/2 teaspoon gluten free baking powder, 1 teaspoon xanthum gum, 1/2 teaspoon salt

Mix 1 Tablespoon olive oil, 1 egg, and yeast w/water together, add the flour mixture and mix.

Dust your hands with rice flour and pat it into a ball. Put it in the pan and (with dusted hands) pat into the pan. Let rise in the pan for 15 min.

Bake for about 8-10 minutes until just starting to brown. Then put your toppings on and bake for another 5 minutes or so until toppings are bubbly and golden.

Tell you what... that was sooooo good after eating some pretty bad gluten free pizza crusts.

Now... anyone have a good buckwheat pancake recipe to make from scratch?

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I don't remember where I got this recipe, but I really like it. I feel when making pancakes buttermilk is a must.

Buttermilk Buckwheat Pancakes

1 cup buckwheat flour

2 tbsp brown sugar

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp salt

1/8 tsp cinnamon

1/8 tsp nutmeg

1/8 tsp ground cloves

1 egg

1 cup buttermilk

1 tbsp butter

-Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl.

-Whisk remaining ingredients together.

-Stir into dry mixture until just moistened.

-Pour batter by 1/4 cupfuls onto heated nonstick skillet.

-Turn when bubbles form on top of pancake.

-Cook until second side is golden brown.

I have a question regarding the pizza crust. It looks like a wonderful recipe and i cannot wait to try it! When you say to use polenta, do you mean cornmeal?

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Yes, polenta is another word for fine cornmeal. I think tapioca flour would sub for the polenta if you didn't want to use corn. I like that little bit of cornmeal in the dough because the texture it gives reminds me of what a wheat pizza tastes like when you dust your pizza pan with cornmeal--that's what it reminds me of.

Yes, my pizza was like a thinner crust, but it wasn't crunchy--it was soft. I just made it stretch because I wanted to feed my whole family with one recipe. I'm sure if you made the pizza a little smaller, the crust would be thicker.

I have a question now about the buckwheat pancakes (and thanks for the recipe! Can't wait to try it!). I can't get buttermilk in Malaysia (where I live), but I can get Greek yogurt and sour cream. Could either of those substitute?

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Yes, polenta is another word for fine cornmeal. I think tapioca flour would sub for the polenta if you didn't want to use corn. I like that little bit of cornmeal in the dough because the texture it gives reminds me of what a wheat pizza tastes like when you dust your pizza pan with cornmeal--that's what it reminds me of.

Yes, my pizza was like a thinner crust, but it wasn't crunchy--it was soft. I just made it stretch because I wanted to feed my whole family with one recipe. I'm sure if you made the pizza a little smaller, the crust would be thicker.

I have a question now about the buckwheat pancakes (and thanks for the recipe! Can't wait to try it!). I can't get buttermilk in Malaysia (where I live), but I can get Greek yogurt and sour cream. Could either of those substitute?

Yes, you can use Greek yogurt or sour cream. Just dilute it with milk so it is a similar consistency to buttermilk. It is usually about a 75/25 or 50/50 ratio depending on how thick the yogurt or sour cream is. I hope you enjoy! I am looking forward to trying the pizza crust recipe. I am curious to see the difference in texture using the cornmeal.

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Buckwheat Pancakes or Flatbread - and bonus, requires no egg, dairy, nor gum !

dry:

1 heaping tablespoon of buckwheat flour (I grind roasted kasha buckwheat in a hand mortar, tastes even better)

1 heaping tablespoon of potato starch

1 heaping tablespoon of garbanzo bean (chickpea) flour

pinch of cream of tartar

big pinch, about a 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

big pinch of salt, about a 1//4 teaspoon

optional:

spices, such as a pinch of sweet spice or cumin, or anise or caraway seed

wet:

in a bowl, put a little puddle of each, olive oil, vinegar, honey or agave syrup or molasses, about a half teaspoon to a teaspoon of each

add some water, maybe 2 tablespoons

put the buckwheat in the vinegar water first, to soak, while you measure out the other ingredients. Add to the buckwheat vinegar water, with enough additional water to make a thick batter- stir well, and immediately pour into a hot skillet with oil in it (olive oil in cast iron is good)

cook until bottom is browned, bubbles are cooking through, and edges start to dry up, then flip and finish cooking

makes one big pancake or flatbread. :)

can add a little more of other gluten free flours such as teff, amaranth, almond or other nut meal such as coconut, just add more water/soda/vinegar

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I purchased the hand mortar at a kitchen store. :) A lot of people will use them to grind their own spice mixes up. You should be able to find one because this was imported from Asia. Try googling kitchen supply store hand mortar and you could probably mail order it.

A magic bullet should work. I bought a little electric grinder for coffee/spices but never bothered to unpack it yet because I was surprised at how easy it was to do a small amount of seeds in the mortar. I tried an electric coffee grinder years ago, but must have gotten the one brand that is useless for almost anything, other than roasted coffee, I ended up giving it away.

I use a blender to grind almonds.

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have you tried Kinnikinnick Foods personal size pizza crusts? Gluten-free, wheat-free, dairy-free, soy-free and trans fat free. delicious! i have not enjoyed pizza in over a year, and the Kinnikinnik Foods pizza crusts has brought back my joy in eating a pizza!

and I have to say Thank God for Buckwheat!! I have an old family recipe using buckwheat and it is one of the dishes I have loved my entire life and I am very happy that buckwheat is not wheat and is easily obtained gluten-free!

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Whisk 1 1/2 C rice flour, 2/3 C potato flour, 1/2 polenta (I'm sure tapioca flour would sub if you can't eat corn), 1/4 C. corn starch, 1 1/2 teaspoon gluten free baking powder, 1 teaspoon xanthum gum, 1/2 teaspoon salt

Thanks for sharing this. I've decided to start baking, despite my reservations about accumulating flours in a NYC-sized kitchen. I guess it was inevitable, because of course I like to eat too much to resist making my own when store bought is off limits. I've noticed that I just need a few standard flours for most recipes - including yours. I already have rice flour, polenta, corn starch, etc. so I just need to purchase potato flour. I think I might plan for a gluten free pizza this weekend!

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i love making pizza, but I buy the mix (namaste). It is gluten free and dairy free and super easy to make, just add water and oil ( I use evoo). I like to put on sauce, mozzarella, and fresh basil. My wife who has no food allergies says its better then any pizza she ever had.

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i love making pizza, but I buy the mix (namaste). It is gluten free and dairy free and super easy to make, just add water and oil ( I use evoo). I like to put on sauce, mozzarella, and fresh basil. My wife who has no food allergies says its better then any pizza she ever had.

Awesome! To say that it is the best pizza your wife has had is the best compliment you can get. I just love it when people taste gluten-free baking or whatever and say they cannot tell it is gluten free. That is precisely the goal!!

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Is it because Super Bowl is coming? I too finally made a good pizza skin!

3 parts brown rice flour (I like Bob's)

3 parts starch (I used corn)

2 parts soy, sorghum or garfava

1 part masa harina (this is what they make tortillas out of, I used blue organic, FUN!)

this is Mary Frances's blend from gluten-free Cooking School

To make the skin:

1 tablespoon yeast (fresh and NOT for bread machines, makes all the difference)

1 1/3 cup milk or some kind of liquid

scant teaspoon sugar

2 cups above mix

1/2 cup of some other grain, amaranth, millet, quinoa OR 1/4 & 1/4 if you want to mix it

2 teaspoons xan gum (gar didn't work for me!)

1 teaspoon salt ( I cut it to 1/2 and it wasn't as good)

2 tablespoons EVOO

1 tablespoon cider vinegar

Heat the milk, 110, add sugar and yeast and one tablespoon mix, it will rise better if it has a LOT to eat! Mix your dry in another big bowl, make a "well" and add oil and cider vinegar to the yeast and then dump it in the well, mix and fold out onto a well oiled piece of parchement paper. I always use parchement paper. Now, if you are a bread baker and feel the need to knead do so now with EVOO all over your hands and paper. You can slather your rolling pin with oil and roll out the skin, you can push it down and around, this is enough to make two med pizzas or one huge, square. You get to call it. You can make several small skins. Cover with plastic and let rise in a warm oven, 170, for at least 30 minutes. Add herbs if you want a more flavorfull skin. Um....you won't be needing more oil! I cooked these 5-7 minutes in a 400 oven. Finally I got it and it's too easy! You can always add flax or chia and you can also dust the bottom of the skin with cornmeal to give it a "crust" like wheat. I sure wish I could share this with you guys, it's taken me 2 years to reach this point but I am there.

This is a "take-off" on Mary Frances's pizza skin, at gluten-free Cooking School site. She really kneads her pizza, made mine tough. I did not knead mine much at all.

You can use this for breadsticks, hamburger buns, hot dog buns, flatbread too!

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Is it because Super Bowl is coming? I too finally made a good pizza skin!

3 parts brown rice flour (I like Bob's)

3 parts starch (I used corn)

2 parts soy, sorghum or garfava

1 part masa harina (this is what they make tortillas out of, I used blue organic, FUN!)

this is Mary Frances's blend from gluten-free Cooking School

To make the skin:

1 tablespoon yeast (fresh and NOT for bread machines, makes all the difference)

1 1/3 cup milk or some kind of liquid

scant teaspoon sugar

2 cups above mix

1/2 cup of some other grain, amaranth, millet, quinoa OR 1/4 & 1/4 if you want to mix it

2 teaspoons xan gum (gar didn't work for me!)

1 teaspoon salt ( I cut it to 1/2 and it wasn't as good)

2 tablespoons EVOO

1 tablespoon cider vinegar

Heat the milk, 110, add sugar and yeast and one tablespoon mix, it will rise better if it has a LOT to eat! Mix your dry in another big bowl, make a "well" and add oil and cider vinegar to the yeast and then dump it in the well, mix and fold out onto a well oiled piece of parchement paper. I always use parchement paper. Now, if you are a bread baker and feel the need to knead do so now with EVOO all over your hands and paper. You can slather your rolling pin with oil and roll out the skin, you can push it down and around, this is enough to make two med pizzas or one huge, square. You get to call it. You can make several small skins. Cover with plastic and let rise in a warm oven, 170, for at least 30 minutes. Add herbs if you want a more flavorfull skin. Um....you won't be needing more oil! I cooked these 5-7 minutes in a 400 oven. Finally I got it and it's too easy! You can always add flax or chia and you can also dust the bottom of the skin with cornmeal to give it a "crust" like wheat. I sure wish I could share this with you guys, it's taken me 2 years to reach this point but I am there.

This is a "take-off" on Mary Frances's pizza skin, at gluten-free Cooking School site. She really kneads her pizza, made mine tough. I did not knead mine much at all.

You can use this for breadsticks, hamburger buns, hot dog buns, flatbread too!

Any idea what I could use to replace the soy, sorghum and garfava? I haven't been able to find those around here yet.

Thanks

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Any idea what I could use to replace the soy, sorghum and garfava? I haven't been able to find those around here yet.

Thanks

Millet, quinoa, groats? gluten-free oats might be nice, I need to try that myself.

You might have to grind your own! No health food store? I buy the seeds at the health food store and grind my own. If you toast them 1st (275, 10-15 min) they will be a finer grind.

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Millet, quinoa, groats? gluten-free oats might be nice, I need to try that myself.

You might have to grind your own! No health food store? I buy the seeds at the health food store and grind my own. If you toast them 1st (275, 10-15 min) they will be a finer grind.

Thank you, I have millet and quinoa. I will look for groats too, I am missing hot breakfast cereal too.

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