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Earlier this year I was tested for Celiac Disease at Mayo Clinic. I will list below the items that seem to important from the lab report. I would appreciate any and all comments from folks that can help in interpreting what these things mean.

I am a 64 year old male and throughout my life I have been troubled with digestive problems. The most serious symptom that I have experienced is pain in the lower right quadrant of my chest. I first experienced this when I was 18 years of age. When I was about 45 I was diagnosed with gerd and have taken prilosec and more recently ranididine since that time. It recently got so serious that I sought help at Mayo Clinic. Since going gluten free I have not had any episodes of the pain, but still have times when I am sick to my stomach and dizzy. I have stopped the acid blockers since they also found no evidence of acid reflux at mayo.

I have a child that was diagnosed with ulcerative colitus about a year ago and am wondering if these things could be related.

Gluten Sensitivity AG.

celiac disease interpeta @a1

IgG, Gliadin(Deamidated) A U 3.0 @a2

IgA, Gliadin (Deamidated) A U 5.5 @a2

IgA, Tissue Transglutanina<4.0 U/mL <1.2

IgG, Tissue Transglutanina<6.0 U/mL <1.2

comments

a1=Permissive genes present, although serology is negative.

Celiac disease is possible. Consider gluten challenge,

a2=<20.0 (negative)

20.0-30.0 (weak Positive)

>30.0 (positive)

Disease Based results ag reference range

disease based results

celiac gene pairs present yes @a1

DQ alpha 1................................ 03:01,05

DQ beta 1................................. @a2

comments

a1=method: low to medium or high resolution molecular testing

a2= 03:01, 03:02

this is an excerpt of the letter I received after the testing.

mr. -------------initiated a gluten-free diet approximately two months ago and has not had chest pain since that time. The tTgIgA and IgG gliadin antbodies were normal. He tested positive for the celiac gene pairs. Since he is on a gluten free diet, it is unclear if the tTg was normal because he does not have celiac sprue or because he is avoiding gluten; therefore, we do not feel compelled to explore this further.

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Earlier this year I was tested for Celiac Disease at Mayo Clinic. I will list below the items that seem to important from the lab report. I would appreciate any and all comments from folks that can help in interpreting what these things mean.

I am a 64 year old male and throughout my life I have been troubled with digestive problems. The most serious symptom that I have experienced is pain in the lower right quadrant of my chest. I first experienced this when I was 18 years of age. When I was about 45 I was diagnosed with gerd and have taken prilosec and more recently ranididine since that time. It recently got so serious that I sought help at Mayo Clinic. Since going gluten free I have not had any episodes of the pain, but still have times when I am sick to my stomach and dizzy. I have stopped the acid blockers since they also found no evidence of acid reflux at mayo.

I have a child that was diagnosed with ulcerative colitus about a year ago and am wondering if these things could be related.

Gluten Sensitivity AG.

celiac disease interpeta @a1

IgG, Gliadin(Deamidated) A U 3.0 @a2

IgA, Gliadin (Deamidated) A U 5.5 @a2

IgA, Tissue Transglutanina<4.0 U/mL <1.2

IgG, Tissue Transglutanina<6.0 U/mL <1.2

comments

a1=Permissive genes present, although serology is negative.

Celiac disease is possible. Consider gluten challenge,

a2=<20.0 (negative)

20.0-30.0 (weak Positive)

>30.0 (positive)

Disease Based results ag reference range

disease based results

celiac gene pairs present yes @a1

DQ alpha 1................................ 03:01,05

DQ beta 1................................. @a2

comments

a1=method: low to medium or high resolution molecular testing

a2= 03:01, 03:02

this is an excerpt of the letter I received after the testing.

mr. -------------initiated a gluten-free diet approximately two months ago and has not had chest pain since that time. The tTgIgA and IgG gliadin antbodies were normal. He tested positive for the celiac gene pairs. Since he is on a gluten free diet, it is unclear if the tTg was normal because he does not have celiac sprue or because he is avoiding gluten; therefore, we do not feel compelled to explore this further.

were you gluten free at the time of testing? If so the testing is invalid. good luck

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were you gluten free at the time of testing? If so the testing is invalid. good luck

Yes I had been on a gluten free diet for about 2 months. I guess the the question that I have is if I have the gene pair does that mean that both of my parents also were genetically predisposed and what implications does this have for my children?

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Yes I had been on a gluten free diet for about 2 months. I guess the the question that I have is if I have the gene pair does that mean that both of my parents also were genetically predisposed and what implications does this have for my children?

One of your parents was predisposed with the DQ7.5 they passed on to you. There is no way to know which parent, or whether your other parent had a celiac gene pair that you did not inherit.

As far as your kids, they have a 50% chance of getting DQ7.5, but so-called celiac genes are quite common and not sufficient for developing celiac. We also find gluten intolerance runs in families so if you have a problem with gluten, your kids may. You won't know anything about celiac vs. gluten intolerance unless you gluten challenge for valid tests.

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One of your parents was predisposed with the DQ7.5 they passed on to you. There is no way to know which parent, or whether your other parent had a celiac gene pair that you did not inherit.

As far as your kids, they have a 50% chance of getting DQ7.5, but so-called celiac genes are quite common and not sufficient for developing celiac. We also find gluten intolerance runs in families so if you have a problem with gluten, your kids may. You won't know anything about celiac vs. gluten intolerance unless you gluten challenge for valid tests.

http://www.celiac.com/

I'm confused. You seem to be saying that celiac and gluten intolerance are two different things. The link above refers to them as being one and the same.

Also I have read a few posts that use the acronym DH. What does DH refer to?

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http://www.celiac.com/

I'm confused. You seem to be saying that celiac and gluten intolerance are two different things. The link above refers to them as being one and the same.

Also I have read a few posts that use the acronym DH. What does DH refer to?

DH = dermatitis herpetiformis. It is the celiac rash.

As far as gluten intolerance, I'm not sure what you read but it is NOT the same as celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease triggered by gluten. Gluten intolerance may have similar symptoms, but it lacks the autoimmunity, and there are probably multiple ways people are reacting to wheat. Sometimes but not always gluten intolerance precedes celiac disease.

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