Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

GFathlete

My Celiac Results...help!

Recommended Posts

I just got my tests back and was wondering how I figure out the reference ranges? Are they different in each lab?

I got my numbers and the very last column says E.U and underneath is .01-20.00. Is this the range that was used?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Hmmm....what kind of celiac panel did they run. For instance...here are my results.

If you see...I am negative. The 8 is my result for gliadin IgA, IgG 14...and anything under 20 is negative. All lab reports are different though and my sister's report looked quite a bit different. They should give you some "guidelines" in the report I would think though.

Deamidated Gliadin IgA 8 <20 Units

Deamidated Gliadin IgG 14 <20 Units

Interpretation Guidelines for Gliadin IgA/IgG

Negative <20 Units

Weak Positive 20-30 Units

Strong Positive >30 Units

Semi-quantitative results were obtained with INOVA Quanta Lite Deamidated

Gliadin Peptide IgA/IgG. The magnitude of the values cannot be correlated to

an

endpoint titer.

Note: Reference Range Updated

TRANSGLUTAMINASE IGA 1 <4 U/mL

Tissue Transglutaminase Interpretation:

Negative <4 U/mL

Weak Positive 4-10 U/mL

Positive >10 U/mL

IgA 392 70 - 400 mg/dL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IgA - 16.4

IgG - 17.29

Anti-transglutiminase Iga - 8.49

Immunoglobulin IgA 121

I wasn't sure how accurate this was since I was on a gluten-free diet beforehand. also have low ferritin levels which have not improved at all despite heavy supplementation.

I do not have insurance and cannot afford a biopsy. However all of my GI symptoms (emergency bathroom trips, depression) have all improved immensely on the diet. The only thing I am waiting on is for my body to start absorbing again.

My plan of attack is to stick with the gluten free diet, and monitor my iron levels every few months to ensure that I am starting to absorb it.

I can't stand the thought of seeing another doctor who is going to tell me something completely different from the last one!

Is this the smart and economical way to approach this?

Hmmm....what kind of celiac panel did they run. For instance...here are my results.

If you see...I am negative. The 8 is my result for gliadin IgA, IgG 14...and anything under 20 is negative. All lab reports are different though and my sister's report looked quite a bit different. They should give you some "guidelines" in the report I would think though.

Deamidated Gliadin IgA 8 <20 Units

Deamidated Gliadin IgG 14 <20 Units

Interpretation Guidelines for Gliadin IgA/IgG

Negative <20 Units

Weak Positive 20-30 Units

Strong Positive >30 Units

Semi-quantitative results were obtained with INOVA Quanta Lite Deamidated

Gliadin Peptide IgA/IgG. The magnitude of the values cannot be correlated to

an

endpoint titer.

Note: Reference Range Updated

TRANSGLUTAMINASE IGA 1 <4 U/mL

Tissue Transglutaminase Interpretation:

Negative <4 U/mL

Weak Positive 4-10 U/mL

Positive >10 U/mL

IgA 392 70 - 400 mg/dL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My test results are as follows (and true to doctor fashion, no one mentioned the need to be on a gluten-free diet prior to the test)

IgA- 16.54

IgG- 17.29

AntitransglutiminaseIgA - 8.49

Immunoglobulin IgA - 121

Gliadin IgA - 12.0

Secretory IgA - 11.36

I do not have insurance and cannot afford a biopsy or more testing. When I am on a gluten-free diet my GI symptoms are pretty much gone. My main concern is my iron level since I am still having some problems with fatique.

My plan of attack is to stick with the Gluten Free diet,and avoid dairy for the time being. I am going to monitor my iron every few months and if it starts absorbing (fingers crossed) than I will have solved the problem and I don't need to go to yet another doctor!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You did not mention in your results the ranges the lab uses for positives and negatives. The raw scores in and of themselves do not mean anything without the lab ranges. :)


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, I guess this goes back to my original question. How would I find the ranges used?

Here is what the numbers look like:

IgA - sensitivity 16.4 E.U .01 - 20.00

Then it goes on for each of the antibodies in this manner....is the range .01-20?

I appreciate the help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IgA - 16.4

IgG - 17.29

Anti-transglutiminase Iga - 8.49

Immunoglobulin IgA 121

I wasn't sure how accurate this was since I was on a gluten-free diet beforehand. also have low ferritin levels which have not improved at all despite heavy supplementation.

The object of the diet is to get the antibodies down. We can not be tested while we are gluten free as that will insure a false negative.

You can stick with the diet if it is helping but if you need to have a doctor derived diagnosis you need to go back on gluten for at least 3 months and then retest. However if your responding well to the diet you may find that 3 month challenge for testing makes you very ill.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sorry :( We pop in, read two or three posts, pick up on something and give an unhelpful response :( As Ravenwood said, the ranges make no difference when your original post says that you were not eating gluten at the time of the testing, and that no one else thought it important that you were. That is so pathetic for medical professionals. :unsure:

Yes, the .01 - 20 is the range for a negative in this instance. But as it turns out it is irrelevant to your situation. I don't know how long you were off gluten, but if it were more than 7-10 days your results are invalid.


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites