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Looking For Rice Bread Recipe

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Hey. I'm looking for a recipe for rice bread using brown rice flour and yeast.

I'm allergig to gluten and I'm intolerant to nightshade and corn.

So the recipe have to be without xanthan gum.

I don't know if I'm intolerent to guar gum, but I think so.

I'm probably also intolerant to legumes suchs as Black/white/brown beans and lentrils

I also got some rice protein powder I'd like use for increasing protein amount in the bread.

Egg and milk is not a problem. But I can't find any butter without corn in it.

I also got a milk product called Ymer.

It got 6.1g protein, 3.6g fat and 4.0g carbohydras per 100 gram.

It got a high amount of Lactic acid bacteria if that helps with raising the bread?

I wouldn't mind some sunflower seeds and/or sesame seeds in the bread

Mayby I can find some sunflower or sesame flour, but I don't remember seeing any.

I'm also interested in Amaranth and Quinoa bread recipes.

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I'm curious why your butter has corn in it. Generally butter (real butter, not margarine) is made with cream, and that's it.

Most recipes using rice flour add other things to improve the texture. In addition to brown rice you could use white rice and sweet rice flour, tapioca, and potato starch flour (I can't remember if you can tolerate nightshades) - add maybe 1/4 cup of those per cup of rice flour. Things like quinoa and millet also help, but only 1/4 c or so per recipe. Yeast will make it rise, but the lactobacillus will not and will be killed during baking and will not add any further benefit. You will need some way to make it all stick together - search this site or the web for replacements for xanthan and guar gums. Some swear by chia seed or flax seed (ground and soaked in water to make a gummy stickiness). Eggs will help if you can tolerate them, and some gelatin.

Get a book like The Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread by Bette Hagman or some of the other gluten-free bread cookbooks out there and you will probably find lots of recipes and ways to adapt them to your specific needs. Libraries often carry these if you don't want to spend the money.

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I'm curious why your butter has corn in it. Generally butter (real butter, not margarine) is made with cream, and that's it.

Most recipes using rice flour add other things to improve the texture. In addition to brown rice you could use white rice and sweet rice flour, tapioca, and potato starch flour (I can't remember if you can tolerate nightshades) - add maybe 1/4 cup of those per cup of rice flour. Things like quinoa and millet also help, but only 1/4 c or so per recipe. Yeast will make it rise, but the lactobacillus will not and will be killed during baking and will not add any further benefit. You will need some way to make it all stick together - search this site or the web for replacements for xanthan and guar gums. Some swear by chia seed or flax seed (ground and soaked in water to make a gummy stickiness). Eggs will help if you can tolerate them, and some gelatin.

Get a book like The Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread by Bette Hagman or some of the other gluten-free bread cookbooks out there and you will probably find lots of recipes and ways to adapt them to your specific needs. Libraries often carry these if you don't want to spend the money.

Corn makes me constipated and the real butter I eat made me constipated. So I assumed it had corn in it.

I've been thinking lately that the constipation is becourse my digestion is messed up do to malnourishment which might explain why the butter made me constipated.

I'll go order those books that you recommended.

Thank you.

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Would you do okay with buckwheat, which is a seed ?

If you could skip the yeast, and do a cider vinegar and baking soda rise, maybe with some yogurt in the bread, you could do microwave breads that don't need any gums or yeast. Try a bun-in-a-cup recipe with half rice flour and half amaranth (good choice for gumless breads and adds proteins) or 1/3 each rice, buckwheat, and amaranth. Pre soaking your grains in the liquid helps make them work better, too. You can use chia seed soaked in cool water to make a "chia gel" that subs for the gums, also. Once you get the bun cup microwave version to your liking, you can then expand it and bake it in a regular oven. Smaller bread pans work to get the best results.

bun in a cup, microwaved,

if a larger cereal bowl is used with more flours and liquids, the result can be sliced to make several slices of "bread"

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Would you do okay with buckwheat, which is a seed ?

If you could skip the yeast, and do a cider vinegar and baking soda rise, maybe with some yogurt in the bread, you could do microwave breads that don't need any gums or yeast. Try a bun-in-a-cup recipe with half rice flour and half amaranth (good choice for gumless breads and adds proteins) or 1/3 each rice, buckwheat, and amaranth. Pre soaking your grains in the liquid helps make them work better, too. You can use chia seed soaked in cool water to make a "chia gel" that subs for the gums, also. Once you get the bun cup microwave version to your liking, you can then expand it and bake it in a regular oven. Smaller bread pans work to get the best results.

bun in a cup, microwaved,

if a larger cereal bowl is used with more flours and liquids, the result can be sliced to make several slices of "bread"

I'm able to eat buckwheat.

I don't know if I can eat baking soda though. It's likely to contain corn. I woth a try though.

I'll try to make some when I get my hands on some baking soda.

Thank you.

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No, baking SODA, aka sodium bicarbonate, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_bicarbonate does not contain corn, <ahttp://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/uploads/emoticons/default_smile.png' alt=':)'> you are confusing it with baking POWDER, a mixture of baking soda, an "acid salt," and a starch, which might contain corn, or potato starch. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baking_powder

Baking soda is used with an acid you add to a recipe, typically pure apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, or yogurt, to make it fizz. The only time I've had a baking soda reaction was when I used a brand packaged by a facility that also processed oats. I switched to the cheaper, regular Arm&Hammer type and was fine.

You can make your own "baking powder" by adding a pinch of cream of tartar (potassium bitartrate http://cookingwiki.org/wiki/Cream_of_Tartar ) to your recipe along with the baking soda, but most of the time, cider vinegar and baking soda works just fine.

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No, baking SODA, aka sodium bicarbonate, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_bicarbonate does not contain corn, <ahttp://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/uploads/emoticons/default_smile.png' alt=':)'> you are confusing it with baking POWDER, a mixture of baking soda, an "acid salt," and a starch, which might contain corn, or potato starch. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baking_powder

Baking soda is used with an acid you add to a recipe, typically pure apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, or yogurt, to make it fizz. The only time I've had a baking soda reaction was when I used a brand packaged by a facility that also processed oats. I switched to the cheaper, regular Arm&Hammer type and was fine.

You can make your own "baking powder" by adding a pinch of cream of tartar (potassium bitartrate http://cookingwiki.org/wiki/Cream_of_Tartar ) to your recipe along with the baking soda, but most of the time, cider vinegar and baking soda works just fine.

...So it shows I'm useless in a kitchen still =D

Oh, well. I'm learning.

Baking soda is called Natron in Danish.

I tried making a wonder-bun and it went fairly well.

I was nice and mushy but it needed more sugar and chocolate though.

Some banana would make it better I reckon.

I used rice flour and buckwheat flour.

I honestly thought it would turn out like concrete...

I'll tried and make some rice bread using yest next probably.

This is going much better than I expeted.

Thank you all.

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