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mzmoe

Son's Test Results?

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Hi there!

My 12 y.o. son has had stomach pains & bowel issues off-and-on for several years. In the last year, he also starting getting skin-colored, itchy bumps on both his elbows from time to time.

Took him to different derms who diagnosed the bumps as psoriasis and then eczema. Wasn't comfortable with those finding so pushed his primary dr. to order celiac panel...

Got the results this week:

TTG-A was 24 (said anything on or above 4 was abnormal)

EMA was positive

Immoglobulin A was 200.

My online research indicates that first two are of concern, the last was within normal range.

Am I interpreting this correctly? With these results, should I be contacting GI doc to move forward with figuring out what's going on with him?

Thanks for any & all input!!!

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Welcome!

The first two tests are celiac antibody tests.

The last test is done to be sure there is enough IgA in the body to assure the antibody tests are accurate.

The next step is to make an appt with GI - the celiac center is preferable.

Do not remove gluten from his diet until he has seen Gastro....and do mention his positive antibody tests to the scheduler to help expedite the appt.

Good luck to you :)

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Welcome!

The first two tests are celiac antibody tests.

The last test is done to be sure there is enough IgA in the body to assure the antibody tests are accurate.

The next step is to make an appt with GI - the celiac center is preferable.

Do not remove gluten from his diet until he has seen Gastro....and do mention his positive antibody tests to the scheduled to help expedite the appt.

Good luck to you :)

Lisa thanks for explaining! Much appreciated :-)

Ironically enough, what was sort of a fluke request (because of the skin bumps) may wind up explaining alot... he was diagnosed AD/HD at a young age and, while I agree with the diagnosis, it wouldn't surprise me if gluten may be exaggerating the symptoms & behaviors.

We'll stick with his current diet until we find out more, but hopefully we can get an appointment soon.

Thanks again!

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Lisa thanks for explaining! Much appreciated :-)

Ironically enough, what was sort of a fluke request (because of the skin bumps) may wind up explaining alot... he was diagnosed AD/HD at a young age and, while I agree with the diagnosis, it wouldn't surprise me if gluten may be exaggerating the symptoms & behaviors.

We'll stick with his current diet until we find out more, but hopefully we can get an appointment soon.

Thanks again!

Good plan. Celiac affects many systems of the body...you will likely be pleasantly surprised with improvements once you are able to eliminate gluten.

Let us know if you have more questions.

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The EMA test is rarely positive until there is fairly advanced intestinal damage - it becomes positive when your body trues to wipe out the top of the intestines while trying to stop whatever has caused previous damage (usually tTG IgA). I would bet a lot of money that the GI will confirm a diagnosis of celiac disease. :(

 

My cousin's son was diagnosed a celiac because his ADHD and cognitive issues led that direction. I hope your son has improvement in many areas of his health.

 

Good luck with getting into the GI in a timely manner.  :)

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The EMA test is rarely positive until there is fairly advanced intestinal damage - it becomes positive when your body trues to wipe out the top of the intestines while trying to stop whatever has caused previous damage (usually tTG IgA). I would bet a lot of money that the GI will confirm a diagnosis of celiac disease. :(

 

My cousin's son was diagnosed a celiac because his ADHD and cognitive issues led that direction. I hope your son has improvement in many areas of his health.

 

Good luck with getting into the GI in a timely manner.  :)

AND

Thanks Nicole!

I've heard once the GI dr. sees results like his, they push to get patient in sooner rather than later- its what the scheduler says anyway...

A friend of mine told me that i should erase gluten from his diet ASAP, but my son's primary doc (& the GI appointment scheduler) said don't change his diet until the GI sees him. I'm guessing we should be following Dr's orders for now?

Again, thanks for the advice!!!

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A friend of mine told me that i should erase gluten from his diet ASAP, but my son's primary doc (& the GI appointment scheduler) said don't change his diet until the GI sees him. I'm guessing we should be following Dr's orders for now?

 

 

I think that depends on when you can get in to see the GI. If it is going to be many months, then he might want to go off gluten for a time but if it is this fall, I think I'd stay the course. You can start lightening up his gluten load though. A gluten challenge (prior to blood testing) just requires about 2 slices of bread per day (for about 2 months) and a gluten challenge for a biopsy is the same amount but for 2-4 weeks typically. If you have a normal 12 year old,I'm guessing that he eats MUCH more than that with cereals, pasta, crackers, pizza, tacos, burritos, toast, waffles, muffins and such. Use this time to start switching over to gluten-free foods and finding some recipes and brands that he enjoys so the switch to 100% gluten-free isn't too difficult.

 

I forgot to ask, has the rest of the family been tested? Siblings and parents?  If anyone else has symptoms, you should consider having them go gluten-free even if they test negative. All of my three boys tested negative (I'm a celiac) but two of them had symptoms; I made our house gluten-free and they are doing better.

 

Best wishes!

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I think that depends on when you can get in to see the GI. If it is going to be many months, then he might want to go off gluten for a time but if it is this fall, I think I'd stay the course. You can start lightening up his gluten load though. A gluten challenge (prior to blood testing) just requires about 2 slices of bread per day (for about 2 months) and a gluten challenge for a biopsy is the same amount but for 2-4 weeks typically. If you have a normal 12 year old,I'm guessing that he eats MUCH more than that with cereals, pasta, crackers, pizza, tacos, burritos, toast, waffles, muffins and such. Use this time to start switching over to gluten-free foods and finding some recipes and brands that he enjoys so the switch to 100% gluten-free isn't too difficult.

 

I forgot to ask, has the rest of the family been tested? Siblings and parents?  If anyone else has symptoms, you should consider having them go gluten-free even if they test negative. All of my three boys tested negative (I'm a celiac) but two of them had symptoms; I made our house gluten-free and they are doing better.

 

Best wishes!

 

 

 

 

We got lucky!  We have an appt. with our local Children's Hospital's Celiac Center THIS Friday afternoon! 
Started looking at gluten-free products at our local food store...Wow, they are alot pricier than foods with gluten in them.  :(  Guess I better start stocking up now....  My son has def. enjoyed a varied gluten-laden diet in the past, I appreciate the suggestions of all the stuff I should wean him onto so that it doesn't feel as burdensome as going cold-turkey w/ the gluten quitting :)   I am going to go gluten-free as well.  I feel it's only fair so that I don't tempt him to stray.  Healthier too, I'm guessing :)
It's just my son and I.  I have had "tummy issues" for years (off and on) but since they weren't life-altering, I just sort of dealt with them.  Due to my son's most-likely impending diagnosis, I will probably be asking my primary to be tested as well.  I have tested positive for something auto-immune related (ANA titers, etc.) but since I didn't show specific symptoms, couldn't figure out what they might indicate so dr. said that might be my norm...?
 
Thanks!!!

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I'm glad you are getting tested too - my stomach issues weren't life altering either, just persistent and annoying. LOL

 

Don't mistake going gluten-free as a healthier way of eating. Gluten-free substitutes (bread, baked goods, noodles) are usually LESS healthy because more sugar is added to make up for the different texture, and the flours have not been fortified like regular wheat flour - that's easy enough to remedy with a multivitamin though.

 

When he see's the GI, you might want to request nutrient testing. Many celiacs are low in B12, D, iron, ferritin, A, potassium, magnesium, zinc, copper and.... i think I'm forgetting something.  Good luck!

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