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Allergic To Gluten And Common Gluten Free Ingredients

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I am feeling bit overwhelmed with my 4 year old daughters allergy test results.  We just found out that she is allergic to wheat, oat, rice, coconut, potato, milk, egg, cheese, tomato, and many other less significant foods. 

I have several questions...

 

1) When baking and cooking what is a good substitute for coconut oil?

 

2) What is a good substitute for coconut flour?

 

3) Does anyone have an all purpose flour I can use/make with the above restricions?

 

4) Does anyone have any pasta suggestions for me with the above limitations?  Is corn pasta my only choice?

 

5) Does anyone have any meal ideas for me given the above limitations?  Her current favorites are pizza and pasta type dishes-pretty sure I am out of luck with those right?

 

I am so appreciative to any help as this is all so very new to me!

 

 

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You are probably going to find yourself making your own flour mixes. The first things that pop in my head that I don't see listed that are staples in my pantry are sorghum, tapioca and quinoa. Bean flours don't appeal to a lot of people, but don't turn everyone off. Buckwheat is also a great option, especially for pancakes. It's very pricey, but there are buckwheat noodles that I've seen in the health food stores with the Asian foods. I've almost bought them a few times but can't justify them for me, I'd be loathe to buy them for a preschool aged child when there are other options. I think Ancient Harvest is quinoa/corn pasta? Not sure what other ingredients it may have.

 

As for meal ideas, now is the time to get her used to standard meat, vegetable, fruit fare. She may not like it at first, but she'll have to learn to like it if she's going to eat.

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You are probably going to find yourself making your own flour mixes. The first things that pop in my head that I don't see listed that are staples in my pantry are sorghum, tapioca and quinoa. Bean flours don't appeal to a lot of people, but don't turn everyone off. Buckwheat is also a great option, especially for pancakes. It's very pricey, but there are buckwheat noodles that I've seen in the health food stores with the Asian foods. I've almost bought them a few times but can't justify them for me, I'd be loathe to buy them for a preschool aged child when there are other options. I think Ancient Harvest is quinoa/corn pasta? Not sure what other ingredients it may have.

 

As for meal ideas, now is the time to get her used to standard meat, vegetable, fruit fare. She may not like it at first, but she'll have to learn to like it if she's going to eat.

F

Forgot about bean flours. They make good pizza crusts because the sauce covers the beany taste

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You are probably going to find yourself making your own flour mixes. The first things that pop in my head that I don't see listed that are staples in my pantry are sorghum, tapioca and quinoa. Bean flours don't appeal to a lot of people, but don't turn everyone off. Buckwheat is also a great option, especially for pancakes. It's very pricey, but there are buckwheat noodles that I've seen in the health food stores with the Asian foods. I've almost bought them a few times but can't justify them for me, I'd be loathe to buy them for a preschool aged child when there are other options. I think Ancient Harvest is quinoa/corn pasta? Not sure what other ingredients it may have.

 

As for meal ideas, now is the time to get her used to standard meat, vegetable, fruit fare. She may not like it at first, but she'll have to learn to like it if she's going to eat.

Ancient harvest only has corn and quinoa flours in it.

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Were you seeing reactions to all those foods?  That is a long and highly unusual list. It isn't recommended to test for things you have not seen an actual reaction to because of the very high rates of false positives in allergy testing.  Were these tests conducted by a board certified allergist? Do you have Epi pens and an emergency action plan?

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Thank you for the replies.  Stephanie, we do not have an epi-pen as she does not go into anaphalactic shock.  Symptoms are blood in stool and possible partial seizures (we are still looking into that) as well as atypical behaviors, similar to what a child with autism may present.  She does not have autism though.  I am an ECSE teacher so I do have experience in regards to child development, but the medical information is something I am conitnue to learn more about.  Her intestines are very inflammed and we are waiting on results of more tests to determine the extent of the damage.  Testing was done by a very reputable clinic/dr. and blood draw was sent to a lab.  I am curious though, how would one determine false negatives?  She is also allergic to citrus fruits, carrots, lettuce, and several other foods.

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Were you seeing reactions to all those foods?  That is a long and highly unusual list. It isn't recommended to test for things you have not seen an actual reaction to because of the very high rates of false positives in allergy testing.  Were these tests conducted by a board certified allergist? Do you have Epi pens and an emergency action plan?

 

I had wondered myself if the tests were done with any sort of medical necessity with that many positives. Also, with that many, it made me wonder if they did one of those types of tests where they test for a reaction when you hold a glass jar with the "essence" of something in a glass jar, or some crap like that. If it was that, you need to get your daughter to an actual medical professional before unnecessarily restricting her diet. I'm not saying she couldn't possibly have all these allergies, God knows I've got some fun allergies that even nurses have scoffed at (and been appropriate set back on their heels), but I hope that an appropriate medical doctor has seen to this and not a loon. I simply went with the assumption that a parent on top of their preschoolers health care was seeing the appropriate people, but sometimes the most well meaning among us can be led astray by those we are supposed to be able to trust.

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I had wondered myself if the tests were done with any sort of medical necessity with that many positives. Also, with that many, it made me wonder if they did one of those types of tests where they test for a reaction when you hold a glass jar with the "essence" of something in a glass jar, or some crap like that. If it was that, you need to get your daughter to an actual medical professional before unnecessarily restricting her diet. I'm not saying she couldn't possibly have all these allergies, God knows I've got some fun allergies that even nurses have scoffed at (and been appropriate set back on their heels), but I hope that an appropriate medical doctor has seen to this and not a loon. I simply went with the assumption that a parent on top of their preschoolers health care was seeing the appropriate people, but sometimes the most well meaning among us can be led astray by those we are supposed to be able to trust.

We had the blood draw done through our Chiropractor who is an MD and has a licensed RN on staff.  I've never heard of a glass jar "essence" test.  Does anyone know if there are a lot of false negatives with a blood draw?  I hadn't really second guessed the validity until now.

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A positive blood test is about 50/50 on being an actual allergy.  If you don't have Epi pens, it isn't an allergy.  Perhaps an intolerance but there is NO reliable testing for those but food logs and trials.  The ONLY 100% accurate test for food allergies is to eat the food to see if there is a reaction (under a Dr's care in a controlled setting). 

 

Honestly it sounds like you need a GI Dr. not a Chiro who "has experience".  Has she been tested for Celiac disease?  If not, I would really be hesitant to take gluten out till that is answered if it isn't an actual allergy (IgE which are the ones that cause anaphylactic reactions).

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A positive blood test is about 50/50 on being an actual allergy.  If you don't have Epi pens, it isn't an allergy.  Perhaps an intolerance but there is NO reliable testing for those but food logs and trials.  The ONLY 100% accurate test for food allergies is to eat the food to see if there is a reaction (under a Dr's care in a controlled setting). 

 

Honestly it sounds like you need a GI Dr. not a Chiro who "has experience".  Has she been tested for Celiac disease?  If not, I would really be hesitant to take gluten out till that is answered if it isn't an actual allergy (IgE which are the ones that cause anaphylactic reactions).

Thank you for the information!  I will talk this over with my husband and look into a GI doctor.

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Orgran brand's buckwheat sprial noodles are the only gluten free pasta I can stomach. (Hee hee.) They're 100% buckwheat and I have found them to be very gentle on my system. Gluten free pasta made with corn or other grains just tear my stomach up. 

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Hi,

I have some experience eliminating all top 8 allergens and peas.  Since rice is on your list ~ flour blends are going to be more your own design. tapioca -thick and wet very dense, chesnut -I don't have a lot of experience with, almond flour-denser flour, corn starch can be used in a flour mix, millet - my gut didn't do great with that, still thinking what to add to excellent suggestions you already got...

 

Egg free substitutes.  The list is long  Ener~G , gelatin, flax or chia mixed with water, baby food puree,  banana or mashed fruit that gives a bit sticky slimey texture,  vinegar and baking powder....  Look for vegan recipes they are already dairy and egg free (2 of the hardest things to switch out in baking/cooking. IMO)  If I have to replace 2 eggs, I try and use 2 different egg swap outs.  I don't bother with recipes that have 5 eggs in it though.

 

In all honesty looking for some ingredients to use, I went back old fashioned and used LARD.  Ate a bread that had bamboo fiber in it.  You are going to have to be open minded about some ingredients, that you would not have considered before.

 

A restricted diet is tough at first, but it can be done.  I think the allergy network has a list of common NON-reactive foods list.  If it seems overwhelming you start with what you can have.  i.e. avocados ~ considered to be well tolerated.  What are you going to do with avocados in your diet?  Vegan recipes can take avocados to "chocolate mousse" not just eaten raw and green.

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There is spaghetti squash for a pasta alternative.  I would spring it on her for a while though, she might have to really miss pasta to be enthused.

 

Try hummus for a creamy "cheesey" alternative.  Romaine lettuce leaves as "sandwich" wraps.

 

I do suggest you keep plenty of "safe" foods on hand, even if it is junk food.  Children are bombarded with "treats" all day as rewards for good behavior.  The point is your child behaved well too, and deserves that treat as much as the rest of the class.  Food allergies should not be punishment and you have to be prepared to battle that backwards message that could play out.  The child should also be empowered when making a CHOICE about which safe food they are choosing.  So the emergency safe food bag must have an assortment.

 

All this part said and done..  There are just going to be times when No No food item is put on display in front of your child.  It really is a bummer that little Suzy had dozens of cupcakes decorated to look like a million butterflies as part of one huge butterfly arrangement at school today.  ( oh. what fun! should we try and decorate your cupcakes a little more special than just frosted?  Maybe. 

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