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whitefairy30

Transglutaminase Value

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Hi.

Do you have a high value of anti transglutaminase tTG iga and igg ?

I read that tTG are formed in The tissue when there are damaged.... In celiacs but also in crohn's and ulcerative colitis.

The celiacs (villi atrophy) it's the last stages of gut damages not the first, so maybe in first stages of inflammation there aren't tTG productions but the damage begin.

I'm curious about your tTG value when you are diagnosed with celiacs (with real damage of gut).


Whitefairy - diagnosed with Dq2 celiac gene (DBQ1*0201.), suffering with IBS and SIBO. 

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Hi.

Do you have a high value of anti transglutaminase tTG iga and igg ?

I read that tTG are formed in The tissue when there are damaged.... In celiacs but also in crohn's and ulcerative colitis.

The celiacs (villi atrophy) it's the last stages of gut damages not the first, so maybe in first stages of inflammation there aren't tTG productions but the damage begin.

I'm curious about your tTG value when you are diagnosed with celiacs (with real damage of gut).

Hi Whitefairy,

I can't be of much help because I'm still trying to figure out why I only show positive for the tTG IgG and negative for everything else. My understanding (with lots of help from the wonderful people on this forum) is that the tTG,IGG is 95 % accurate in the the sensitivity category.  The lab that did my blood work was Quest Diagnostics and they only showed a range of <6 low and >6 or 7 high.  Mine showed up at 10 high, but I haven't been able to find the maximum in their range for tTG so I still can't compare my readings to others who have different labs and different numbers. I haven't had the biopsy done because I can't stand the thought of going back to eating gluten, which is necessary for that test.  Good luck in your search for an answer. I'll be following to see if you get it figured out.

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You had a positive on a Chron's test. Is your doctor followining through? Also, I think you need a complete celiac blood panel to rule out celiac disease. Having the genes for celiac disease (about 30% of the population has it, but only a tiny amount of people go on to develop celiac disease), just means you have the potential.

My TTG tests were NOT positive, yet I had a Marsh Stage IIIB biopsy which is moderate to severe damge. Only one DPG was positve on the panel for me. Here are the standard tests (no stool):

-tTG IgA and tTG IgG

-DGP IgA and DGP IgG

-EMA IgA

-total serum IgA and IgG (control test)

-AGA IGA and AGA IgG - older and less reliable tests largely replace by the DGP tests

-endoscopic biopsy - make sure at least 6 samples are taken

(Source: NVSMOM -- )


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I have a light positive on asca igg but negative iga.

Doc said asca measured gut permeability. I don't have any colonscopy yet.

Asca are found in crohn s, diabetes, other autoimmune issue ( ulcerative colitis, autoimmune liver and pancreas), and celiacs.

So today asca cannot be used only as crohn s marker.

I have a tTG test in 2013 done was negative, then an dgp iga and igg last month and was negative.

In stool The older iga gliadin test was positive, but I know there aren't recognize from normal doctor.


Whitefairy - diagnosed with Dq2 celiac gene (DBQ1*0201.), suffering with IBS and SIBO. 

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That is correct! I am thankful that my GI doctor ordered the complete celiac panel. When only one of the DGP tests was positive, he ordered the endoscopy to confirm my diagnosis. I had a colonoscopy too since that was the reason I went to the GI doctor (cancer screening because I hit 50 years old). Anemia was really my only symptom, so I was shocked.

Celiac disease testing is not concrete.

So, perhaps, if you feel confident that celiac disease is not an issue (at least not yet or maybe never), you should find out what autoimmune disorder you do have. I would imagine that an endoscopy and a colonoscopy would be the next step.

Do not settle for an IBS diagnosis, until everything has been ruled out. Remember, you can go gluten free or journal your food intake to determine all possible intolerances once you have finished celiac testing. It costs nothing and you might get relief.


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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The tTG IgA is specific to celiac disease 95% of the time.  5% of the positive results are false positives, and they are (usually) weak positives caused by crohn's, colitis, diabetes, thyroiditis, liver disease, or a serious infection.

 

It is confusing because the severity of the disease is NOT reflected in the serologic values like it is in other autoimmune diseases.  Some people have perfect blood tests but their endoscopy shows horrific damage.  Others may have a perfect biopsy but sky high blood test results.

 

In celiac testing,  the tests work about 80% of the time.

 

I had high tTG IgA and EMA IgA.  No other blood tests were available to me.  I declined to have the endoscopic biopsy done because I was positive of my results.


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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For those who don't mind getting even more confused, you might check this site:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2666354/

 

This study was mainly looking at comparing two methods of serum testing for Celiac, but along the way he makes some interesting statements regarding the value of the TTG, IGG results.

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For those who don't mind getting even more confused, you might check this site:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2666354/

 

This study was mainly looking at comparing two methods of serum testing for Celiac, but along the way he makes some interesting statements regarding the value of the TTG, IGG results.

As far as I understand that article, the MIA version of the tTG IgG is less sensitive than the usual ELISA version of the tTG IgG, and a positive tTG IGG in the MIA tests means you have celiac disease with 100% certainty.


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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I found this about tTG, in celiac (celiac disease) and IBD.
 
"SUMMARY
Recent studies identified tissue transglutaminase (tTG) as the antigen eliciting antiendomysial antibodies (EMA) in
celiac disease (celiac disease). Anti-tTG antibodies have therefore been proposed as a serological test for celiac disease. Nevertheless, IgA
anti-tTG but not EMA have also been found in inflammatory bowel disease patients, suggesting that these antibodies
are linked to a tissue lesion rather than to an auto-immune component of celiac disease. To confirm this hypothesis, we evaluated
the presence of IgA anti-tTG in patients with inflammatory and degenerative diseases, in whom tissue lesions presented
far away from the intestinal mucosa.
The study was carried out on the serum and synovial fluid (SF) of 68 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA=33), psoriatic
arthritis (PsA=26) and osteoarthritis (OA=9).
In RA, PsA and OA sera, IgA anti-tTG were positive in 33%, 42% and 11% of patients, respectively.
Serum anti-tTG levels were significantly higher in RA (p<0.0001), PsA (p<0.0001) and OA (p<0.02) with respect to
healthy controls. SF anti-tTG levels were significantly higher in PsA (p<0.018) than in OA.
A good correlation between serum and synovial fluid anti-tTG levels was found in all arthropathies
This study suggests that tTG is not the only antigen of EMA and, furthermore , that IgA anti-tTG antibodies represent
a general lesion-associated event. Moreover, the significant correlation between serum and synovial fluid anti-tTG
levels allow us to hypothesise that these antibodies could be synthesized in the site of arthritic lesions."

Whitefairy - diagnosed with Dq2 celiac gene (DBQ1*0201.), suffering with IBS and SIBO. 

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