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Newly Diagnosed Celiac -- Grains? Or No?

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I am a newly diagnosed celiac, as in two weeks. I know what gluten is and where it hides. However I am so confused when it comes to whether eating other grains is okay? (Such as the rice flour substitutes for flour ie. Udi's) I have read so much conflicting information. Some believe you should stay away from all grains altogether for 3-6 months, and some don't see it as a problem. I find it really hard to eliminate ALL grains, so I tend to go back and forth. But I do want to heal and do it right, so I am looking for others opinions and insights.

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The Celiac experts do not say you must eliminate all grains. For example:

"A gluten-free diet means avoiding all foods that contain wheat (including spelt, triticale, and kamut), rye, and barley, and their derivatives. Despite these restrictions, you can still eat a well-balanced diet with a variety of foods, including gluten-free bread and pasta. For example, instead of wheat flour, use potato, rice, soy, corn, or bean flour. Fresh meat, fish, rice, fruits, and vegetables do not contain gluten, so you can eat as much of these foods as you want."

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/living-with-celiac/guide/treatment

Good food list here::

http://www.csaceliacs.org/grains_and_flours_glossary.jsp


 

 

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Karen is right, but I would be cautious in introducing grains or additives that you have not eaten before. For example, I found that Xanthan Gum that is found in many gluten-free breads and flour blends (it is a binder) bothered me. Not my husband who has been gluten-free for 14 years, but me, when I was first diagnosed. I switched to guar gum and did well. I also found that I could not tolerate oats or quinoa. No gluten issues it was just hard to digest for me. Now, I can eat those things without issue, but I am two years into my gluten-free diet. So, keep a journal.

Finally, eating whole foods is best. Switching to gluten-free cookies and cakes is not good for healing. Save those treats for special occasions!


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Although some grains (rice, quinoa etc) are allowed on the celiac diet I, personally, would avoid them and all processed foods, as much as possible, for a few months.  Load up on good cooked veggies, meats (baked chicken, fish....) and fruits.  Even skip the nuts.  Newly diagnosed, your gut is still raw and needs time to heal.  Grains can be hard to digest and can slow down the healing process.  Processed foods (and gluten free breads etc are no exception) are loaded with ingredients that, while safe for celiacs, are not good for us.   Skip corn when you can as it can be really hard to digest.  A handful of popcorn sent me into glutened like symptoms for a week.  Very hard to digest.  Dairy products can cause gluten-type symptons as a lot of celiacs are also lactose intolerant, which in time may pass.   I know it seems over the top but it will help you heal faster.  Then, slowly, slowly reintroduce other foods if you want.   

Also.... not all gluten free processed foods are ok for your particular self. They might be fine for someone else, but not you.  Case in point.....  We have a piece of Udi's g.f. bread now and then with no gut issues.  We found a new brand in the store and tried it.  omg!  We were both in tummy pain.  I reread the ingredients and this certain brand had bamboo fiber in it.  I checked it out and although bamboo fiber is certainly gluten free it is processed and used as a thickener, not something that digests.  The goats ate that loaf of bread! 

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Thank you. I started out not eating any grains, but I just became so bored and ran out of things to eat. I really hate eating the same thing everyday, and have a hard time getting full off it for some reason (prolly cause I'm addicted to bread). I do want to heal. I just need to find a way to dedicate myself to it. And I just bought a loaf of gluten-free bread :/

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Just freeze it! It will last for many months.


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I make my own gluten-free bread and it doesn't seem to bother me at all. I think the most important thing is to STAY gluten-free. If that means you need to eat a bit of gluten-free bread here and there, I think that is far better than falling off the wagon so to speak. Maybe just keep the harsher things to a minimum and see how they effect you. That is just my,  also new, humble opinion.

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Do you have a sweet tooth at all?  If so try this yummy chocolate treat:

 

1 ripe avocado

1/4 cup of cocoa powder

1/4 cup (organic) maple syrup

1/4 cup almond milk (I use coconut milk)

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

 

put it all in a blender and puree till smooth.  pour into small bowl, chill and eat.  Sooooo good!

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