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Hi guys, just been diagnosed with coeliacs disease. I have no symptoms, was discovered in a blood test for something unrelated and confirmed in a biopsy.

I don't know how seriously I should take this? Obviously I've cut out gluten but I don't know how thorough about it I should be. EG. Buttering toast: I have gluten-free bread, partner doesn't, can we use the same butter that both knives have been dipped in? Do you eat things that 'May Contain Gluten' rather than def have it as an ingredient? What about things that are gluten free that are cooked in the same fryer/griddle etc as gluten containing items? I was in a cafe earlier where they had a couple of gluten-free cake options, clearly labelled amongst the others, but it was self service and the same couple of pairs of tongs were being used for everything - is this ok? If I make my partner a 'normal' sandwich and then mine do I need to wash my hands etc - cross contamination?

I don't want to be unnecessarily melodramatic and a general pain in the butt about it, but at the same time I don't want to be doing internal damage because I've not been thorough enough about managing it. Where do you draw the line? If I kiss my partner in a bar and he's drinking beer am I getting gluten?! lol

I've bought gluten-free bread, cereal and pasta and ruled out anything with gluten on the ingredients. Help!

 

 

 

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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Hi,

Since you know now that you have celiac disease, you need to be 100% gluten free even though you say you do not have any symptoms. I realized later that some symptoms that I experienced were actually from celiac disease and I did not even know that was causing them.

Your questions and answers:

can we use the same butter that both knives have been dipped in? No, it will be cross-contaminated and thus, not good for you. Also, do not use same sponge for washing dishes. I even bought new pots I use only for my meals since the kitchen is not completely gluten free.

Do you eat things that 'May Contain Gluten' rather than def have it as an ingredient?  The reason why it is possible to contain gluten is because it is getting produced at the factory and/or using same assembly lines where they also produce products contain gluten, so stay away from these products as well.

What about things that are gluten free that are cooked in the same fryer/griddle etc as gluten containing items? Not safe unless washed extremely well but I would be still worried. You will have to have your own toaster.

I was in a cafe earlier where they had a couple of gluten-free cake options, clearly labelled amongst the others, but it was self service and the same couple of pairs of tongs were being used for everything - is this ok? No, it can get your gluten free cake contaminated.

If I make my partner a 'normal' sandwich and then mine do I need to wash my hands etc - cross contamination? Yes, always wash your hands before touching any of your food and/or eating.

If I kiss my partner in a bar and he's drinking beer am I getting gluten?! Yes. It is recommended that the partner brushes his teeth. Also, have your own toothpaste.

I know that this may sound extreme but you need to be careful about cross-contamination. Good luck. You will figure it out.

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If you are just starting out, it can seem overwhelming. Let me help a bit:

Bad news: You have an incurable disease.

Good news: Your disease requires no surgery or meds. All you have to do is be very careful with your food.    You are starting off at a wonderful time. Because of all the fad dieters who have gone gluten free, there is a wealth of prepared food available and competition among producers to make it better and better is keen. More food service workers know what gluten is and how to avoid it. Many of the very best (and best for you) foods are naturally gluten free. Shop the perimeter of the grocery store. Fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy products and meat are all gluten free.

Now look how much longer the good news is than the bad. And there is lots more good news. Read these forums to learn new recipes, safe prepared foods and a wealth of other useful information. Don't let the exaggerators scare you. Be sure the information you rely on is up-to-date. Times have changed, generally for the better. if you have questions, this is a good place to get reliable information. Good luck and good health to you.

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I agree with the comments made above. You need to take coeliac disease seriously and cut out all wheat and gluten, as well as avoiding all cross contamination of gluten etc too.  The way you'd phrased the questions, I get the feeling that you had already given these issues serious thought and that you just wanted someone to confirm what you'd been thinking.  It can seem a little daunting when you are first diagnosed; I think you just need a little time to get your head round it.


Under active thyroid; diabetic; hiatus hernia; acid reflux; dairy intolerant; arthritis; sciatica due to spine degeneration; diagnosed with coeliac disease November 2011; fibromyalgia; allergic to Thyme & MSG and alcohol. Allergic to TCP antiseptic, and plasters. Taking medication for severe muscle spasms in upper back.

Despite all, remaining positive!

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Thanks guys, you're right, lot to take in!

Separate pans etc seems a bit much?  I'd formerly been happy that I'd washed them enough to use the for raw chicken then cooked etc - seems a bit melodramatic?

I know I have to take it seriously but where do you draw the line? My house is never going to be a sterile lab environment, I still want to go out and I want to be able to kiss my kids and partner without ordering them to brush their teeth first!

 

 

 

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Let me expand on what has been said about cooking pans so you won't think you have to have separate everything....because you do not!  Stainless steel or aluminum pans or other metals which are not porous can be shared, as long as you give them a good wash.  Teflon which has been scratched up needs to be replaced and cast iron should be dedicated to gluten-free only.  One is porous and the other, Teflon, is OK as long as it is not all scratched and old. Gluten can become lodged in the scratches, over time, and then you end up getting sick or becoming slowly symptomatic.  I know you said you are not symptomatic but as time goes on and you heal, you might find down the road you start to suffer symptoms if you take a hit.

Utensils like wooden spoons or plastic ones should be replaced.  It is a good excuse to buy new stuff for yourself!  I usually never buy plastics and use metal utensils that can be easily washed but wooden spoons have to be dedicated to gluten-free use only.  I also only use glass bowls and containers for food storage at home because they keep food fresher longer than plastics do and I don't have to worry about anything.  You have to be careful and learn how cc works and not be paranoid.

As for shared facilities, that is a lot different than shared lines. I am an extremely sensitive, diagnosed Celiac and will eat things from shared facilities but not from shared lines. Calling manufacturers to find out their processes for keeping food separate can be very helpful in making a decision on what to do.  Make sure to buy any books on the subject from good medical sources and not from celebrities....they tend to be the fad dieters who really don't have Celiac. You do have to take this very seriously for good health down the road.  But it can be done and gets easier with each passing year. I have been doing this for over 10 years and it's second nature to me now.  I rarely take a hit, at this point.

Good luck!

 

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And if you go to the coping section here, pinned to the top is a thread called "Newbie 101". Read that and you'll get more great info.


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

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