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Aspirant

What tests for Non Celiac gluten Intolerance?

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Hello,

I need  list of tests to be done by any doctor to Identifying Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance. Are there any tests which doctor can do.?

Any suggestions regarding these are always welcome.

Thanks,

Aspirant. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Aspirant said:

Hello,

I need  list of tests to be done by any doctor to Identifying Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance. Are there any tests which doctor can do.?

Any suggestions regarding these are always welcome.

Thanks,

Aspirant. 

 

 

There aren't any that are accepted by the medical community

 

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/can-the-elisa-igg-food-panel-detect-gluten-sensitivity/

 

Edited by kareng

 

 

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The only test I know is a self-administered elimination diet.  Cut out all gluten for 3 to 6 months and then re-introduce it.  Record your symptoms as you go.  If they change you may have your answer.  Some times NCGS is actually FODMAP intolerance per current thinking.  That's another route to explore.


Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."

Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.

Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, eggplant, celery, strawberries, pistachios, and hard work. Have a good day! 🙂 Paul

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I am wondering why you're asking specifically about NCGI. Have you been tested for celiac disease?


Gluten free Dec. 2011
Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Reynaud's October 2018

Rheumatoid Arthritis October 2018

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There isn't really a formal diagnosis, because there's not yet a test for it, although that may soon change, there's some promising work ongoing on detecting new markers. It's yet to reach the mainstream medical community however. Of course that won't stop people taking your money off you.

Your test at present would be to go through celiac testing process. If that's negative but you react to the gluten free diet then you could be diagnosed as ncgs by exclusion. At that point you may want to try the fodmaps diet as the Monash university study suggested that many who reported a reaction to gluten were actually reacting to fodmaps. 

However the ultimate arbiter of your health is you. If you come out of the other side of the diagnostic process without a firm diagnosis you need to decide for yourself on the evidence you have available what you're going to do. For me it was lifetime exclusion of gluten from my diet and with it the resolution or drastic improvement of a series of symptoms from GI to neurological.

Best of luck :)

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Aspirant said:

The reason I am asking is for myself and my Son. who is 10 years old. He is showing the symptoms. 

There aren't any.  You can get him tested for Celiac disease, which is a good idea to do before you make him gluten free.


 

 

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Having negative basic testing... my diagnosis was going gluten-free and finding I felt better 3.5 yrs ago.  No looking back.  We have fine tuned even more now with no dairy, no soy, no chocolate, no coffee, no artificial sweeteners, limited eggs and peppers, no white potatoes, no rancid vegetable oils, very low carb and high fat.  Life is good again!  Those food pyramids by the government are just plain wrong!  The human body does NOT require any carbs for health.  Triggering an insulin response repeatedly leads to insulin resistance, obesity, cancer and a whole host of other diseases!  I was shocked when I found all this out.  How I wish I'd known this when my children were growing up.  We didn't learn any of this in nursing school!

Debbie

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